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Building Adaptive Coping and Knowledge to Improve Daily Life (Back2Life)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04602728
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : October 26, 2020
Last Update Posted : November 9, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Soumitri Sil, Emory University

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to find out how teenagers with chronic pain and sickle cell disease respond to a new training program called Back2Life and get their feedback about how to modify the program to best fit their needs. The Back2Life training program focuses on teaching pain coping skills (also known as cognitive-behavioral therapy). The program teaches skills and strategies that may help teens improve chronic pain management and get back into their everyday activities.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Sickle Cell Disease Behavioral: Back2Life Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder of the hemoglobin in which the course of acute pain from vaso-occlusion and its sequelae vary widely across genotypes and individual patients. SCD pain often begins during childhood and can progress to chronic pain for approximately 23% of children and adolescents. Youth with chronic SCD pain, that is pain that is present on most days per month and persists for at least 6 months, report high levels of functional disability, elevated depressive and anxiety symptoms, and reduced quality of life relative to youth with SCD without chronic pain. The complex, multifactorial nature of chronic SCD pain can also contribute to increased healthcare utilization for pain. The most effective management and treatment of chronic SCD pain likely requires individualized, multimodal, multidisciplinary treatments that go beyond pharmacological management alone. A range of evidence-based non-pharmacological treatments, such as behavioral health, complementary, and integrative health approaches, are recommended for chronic pain management and are gaining greater awareness and integration into comprehensive chronic pain care.

Behavioral health treatment, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain, focuses on improved daily functioning and coping through several core treatment components such as psychoeducation about how the body processes pain, relaxation skills training, and cognitive strategies. Youth with chronic SCD pain need an evidence-based, culturally informed, adaptive treatment. Behavioral treatments that are tailored to patient and family needs are beneficial when patients may require different levels of care. Adaptive designs are more effective in improving health outcomes, satisfaction with treatment, and reducing healthcare use than standard protocols where patients receive a fixed "one size fits all" treatment that is not personalized to their needs; adaptive designs are also recommended for tailoring evidence-based interventions with culturally diverse populations. Adaptive treatments can integrate evidence-based strategies to address common co-morbid problems associated with chronic pain, such as elevated anxiety or depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance. Teaching parents problem-solving skills can reduce caregiver stress among families managing chronic pain and illness.

This study will utilize an adaptive behavioral treatment to target psychosocial risk factors for youth with chronic SCD pain as a first step towards developing a stepped care model for SCD pain.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Intervention Model Description: 25 youth and parent/caregiver dyads will participate in the same intervention.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Building Adaptive Coping and Knowledge to Improve Daily Life (Back2Life): A Pilot Feasibility Clinical Trial for Youth With Chronic Sickle Cell Pain
Estimated Study Start Date : December 2020
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 2022

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Back2Life Program
Youth with chronic SCD pain and their parents or caregivers receiving an adaptive cognitive behavioral treatment program for pain coping skills.
Behavioral: Back2Life
The Back2Life intervention uses an adaptive treatment approach with module-based treatment sessions selected on the basis of baseline assessment (rather than a fixed treatment approach) to allow flexibility in tailoring treatment components to meet individual family needs. All youth participants will receive the standard 6-session pain coping skills training program, consisting of learning ways to cope with and manage chronic sickle cell pain. The standard program includes topics that were identified by young people with chronic sickle cell pain and their parents as important skills for all youth with chronic pain and sickle cell disease. In addition to the standard 6-session program, youth participants may receive an additional 1 to 4 sessions that may help with specific problems and/or co-morbidities related to pain. At least one parent or guardian is required to attend the sessions with their child.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric Short Form Pain Interference Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The PROMIS Pediatric Short Form for Pain Interference, Self- and Parent-Proxy Report, is an 8-item self-report measure assessing functional interference due to pain in the past 7 days. Total scores are standardized to a T-score with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10, where higher scores indicate increased hindrance of life activities due to pain.

  2. Change in Sickle Cell Disease Pain Burden Interview-Youth (SCPBI-Y) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The Sickle Cell Pain Burden Interview for Youth, Self- and Caregiver-Proxy Report is a 7-item, validated measure of pain burden in 7-21 year olds. Responses are given on a 5-point Likert scale where 0 = none and 4 = every. Both the patient self-report and parent-proxy ask respondents to report the amount of days in the past month where pain occurred or pain impacted daily life. Total scores range from 0 to 28 and higher scores indicate a greater pain burden.

  3. Change in PROMIS Pediatric Short Form Pain Behaviors Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The PROMIS Pediatric Short Form Pain Behaviors, Parent-Proxy Report is an 8-item measure completed by parents that assesses pain behaviors displayed by their child in the past 7 days. Total scores are standardized to a T-score with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10, where higher scores indicate increased behaviors due to pain.

  4. Change in Child Self-Efficacy Scale Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    Child Self-Efficacy Scale, Self- and Parent-Proxy Report is a well-established, 7-item measure of self-efficacy for functioning despite pain for 8-19 year olds. Respondents report how sure about their (or their child's) ability to perform certain daily tasks when they have pain, on a scale from 1 to 5 where 1 = very sure and 5 = very unsure. Total scores range from 7 to 35 and lower scores indicate greater self-efficacy.

  5. Number of Dyads Completing the Study [ Time Frame: Month 6 ]
    Treatment feasibility will be assessed by the number of participant dyads who complete the study.

  6. Percent of Study Assignments Completed [ Time Frame: Month 6 ]
    Treatment feasibility will be assessed by completion of study assignments.

  7. Participant Evaluation of the Intervention [ Time Frame: Immediately Post-Treatment ]
    Treatment feasibility will be assessed via a qualitative interview where participants are asked open ended questions. Participants will be asked if they thought the Back2Life program is a reasonable approach for chronic pain management, if the program was helpful, and if it could be integrated into their lifestyle. Participants will also be asked to describe barriers in implementing the program.

  8. Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form (TEI-SF) Score [ Time Frame: Immediately Post-Treatment ]
    The Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form will be completed at the end of treatment. It includes 9 items adapted to be specific to pediatric pain. Items are rated on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 to 5. Total scores range from 9 to 45. Higher scores indicate increased acceptability with the study treatment.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of Emergency Department Visits [ Time Frame: 12 months prior to Baseline to 12 months post-treatment ]
    Healthcare utilization will be extracted from the medical record to document the total number of emergency department (ED) visits for pain for 6-months and 12-months pre- and post-treatment.

  2. Number of Hospital Admissions [ Time Frame: 12 months prior to Baseline to 12 months post-treatment ]
    Healthcare utilization will be extracted from the medical record to document the total number of hospital admissions for pain for 6-months and 12-months pre- and post-treatment.

  3. Change in Daily Opioid Use [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    Daily use of opioid pain medication will be determined based on participant completion of daily diaries for 1-week at each assessment visit. Participants will record opioid use daily (presence/absence).

  4. Change in Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The Pediatric Inventory for Parents is a 42-item parent-reported measure of caregiver stress related to child chronic illness. Responses are given on a 5-point Likert scale where 1 = not at all and 5 = extremely. Total scores range from 42 to 210 and higher scores indicate greater caregiver stress.

  5. Change in Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS) is a 28-item patient-reported describing the occurrence and frequency of various behavioral sleep characteristics over the past month. Responses are given on a 6-point Likert scale where 1 = always and 6 = never. Total scores range from 28 to 168 and higher scores indicate better sleep quality.

  6. Change in PROMIS Pediatric Short Form Depressive Symptoms Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The PROMIS Pediatric Short Form Depressive Symptoms questionnaire, Self- and Parent-Proxy Report is an 8-item measure designed for youth to assess self-reported symptoms of depression. Total scores are standardized to a T-score with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10, where higher scores indicate increased depression.

  7. Change in Pain Catastrophizing Scale Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Child and Parent Report, is a 13-item well-validated self-report and parent-report measure of worried thoughts about pain. Items are answered on a 5-point scale where 0 = not true at all and 4 = very true. Total scores range from 0 to 52 and higher scores indicate increased catastrophic thinking.

  8. Change in Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Immediately Post-Treatment, Month 3, Month 6 ]
    The Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire, Adolescent and Parent Report is a 30-item measure designed to evaluate parent and adolescent perceptions of readiness to adopt a self-management approach to pain. Responses to items are given on a 5-point scale where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Average scores are obtained for categories of precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance and the category with the highest score indicates where the youth participant is in terms of stages of change related to pain management.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   10 Years to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for Youth:

  • diagnosed with SCD (any genotype)
  • report chronic pain
  • speak and read English
  • have not initiated new disease modifying-treatments (e.g, hydroxyurea, Endari, voxeletor, crizanlizumab, chronic transfusions) or significantly increased dosages of any disease-modifying treatments in the past 3 months

Inclusion Criteria for Parents or Caregivers:

  • speak and read English

Exclusion Criteria for Youth:

  • have comorbid medical conditions typically associated with pain but unrelated to SCD (e.g., rheumatologic disorders or inflammatory bowel disease)
  • are receiving chronic transfusion indicated for central nervous system risks and/or complications, previous overt strokes, or significant cognitive or developmental limitations, as per their healthcare provider or parent, that would impair completion of self-report measures or engagement in treatment sessions
  • received ≥ 3 sessions of outpatient psychological therapy for pain management in the 6 months prior to screening

Exclusion Criteria for Parents or Caregivers:

  • have significant cognitive limitations or severe psychiatric conditions, as per the child's healthcare team or history, that would impair completion of self-report measures or engagement in treatment sessions

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04602728


Contacts
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Contact: Soumitri Sil, PhD 404-727-2712 soumitri.sil@emory.edu

Locations
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United States, Georgia
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Hugh Spalding Recruiting
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30303
Chilldren's Healthcare of Atlanta Recruiting
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Emory Children's Center Recruiting
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Sponsors and Collaborators
Emory University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Soumitri Sil, PhD Emory University
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Responsible Party: Soumitri Sil, Associate Professor, Emory University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04602728    
Other Study ID Numbers: STUDY00000573
1K23HL133457 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: October 26, 2020    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 9, 2020
Last Verified: November 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Soumitri Sil, Emory University:
Pediatrics
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Behavioral intervention
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Anemia, Sickle Cell
Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital
Anemia, Hemolytic
Anemia
Hematologic Diseases
Hemoglobinopathies
Genetic Diseases, Inborn