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Social Media and COVID-19

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04367363
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 29, 2020
Last Update Posted : December 29, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jean Liu, Yale-NUS College

Brief Summary:
In this protocol, we seek to examine the role of popular messaging platform WhatsApp in information spread during a crisis. As there have been few global crises in the last decade (coinciding with the rise of social media), the role of private messaging platforms such as WhatsApp during crisis contexts remains understudied. During the current COVID-19 global health crisis, we undertook this study to: (1) characterize the nature of WhatsApp use during crises, (2) characterize the profiles of WhatsApp users (3) understand how WhatsApp usage links to well-being (fear and thoughts about COVID-19).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Coronavirus Depression Anxiety Stress Behavioral: Social media & news consumption

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 151 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Tracking WhatsApp Behaviors During a Crisis: A Longitudinal Observation of Messaging Activities During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Actual Study Start Date : March 17, 2020
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 7, 2020
Actual Study Completion Date : May 31, 2020

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Community sample
We plan to recruit a representative sample of the Singapore population.
Behavioral: Social media & news consumption
Daily reports of social media use and consumption, including reports on receiving and disseminating news articles related to the COVID-19 situation (e.g., how many messaging groups shared news on the outbreak, how many items related to the outbreak they forwarded to others, etc).




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. WhatsApp usage [ Time Frame: 1 week, starting from date after baseline survey completion ]
    Participants were asked a series of questions daily related to their WhatsApp usage behaviors - in particular, their message-forwarding, personal chat and group chat behaviors.

  2. Changes in fear with regards the COVID-19 situation across 1 week [ Time Frame: 1 week, starting from date after baseline survey completion ]
    1 item each day on fear specifically of the COVID-19 situation (measured on a 4 point scale: min = 1, max = 4; higher scores indicating greater fear about the outbreak).

  3. Changes in amount of thinking about the COVID-19 situation across 1 week [ Time Frame: 1 week, starting from date after initial survey completion ]
    1 item each day on how much they thought about the outbreak that day (measured on a 5 point scale: min = 1, max = 5; higher scores indicating more thinking about the outbreak).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Representative sample of the Singapore population
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • At least 21 years
  • Has stayed in Singapore for at least 2 years
  • Has a WhatsApp account that can be used for the research study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Below 21 years
  • Has stayed in Singapore for less than 2 years
  • Does not have a WhatsApp account that can be used for the research study

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04367363


Locations
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Singapore
Yale-NUS College
Singapore, Singapore, 138527
Sponsors and Collaborators
Jean Liu
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jean Liu, PhD Yale-NUS College
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Responsible Party: Jean Liu, Assistant Professor, Yale-NUS College
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04367363    
Other Study ID Numbers: 2020-CERC-001B
First Posted: April 29, 2020    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 29, 2020
Last Verified: December 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: Due to stipulations by the Institutional Review Board, data cannot be shared.

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Jean Liu, Yale-NUS College:
Social Media
Misinformation
COVID-19
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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COVID-19
Respiratory Tract Infections
Infections
Pneumonia, Viral
Pneumonia
Virus Diseases
Coronavirus Infections
Coronaviridae Infections
Nidovirales Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases