Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Practice-based Intervention for Vietnamese and Korean Patients

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03064724
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 27, 2017
Last Update Posted : February 27, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of California, San Francisco
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Thu Quach, Asian Health Services

Brief Summary:
This pilot project examined the feasibility of an multilingual interactive video education intervention "an interactive Mobile Doctor intervention (iMD)" to promote patient-provider discussion on tobacco use for Korean- and Vietnamese-speaking male patients at primary care settings.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Smoking Cessation Tobacco Use Behavioral: Interactive Mobile Doctor ("iMD") Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
While California has made significant strides in tobacco control and is leading the nation in reducing smoking use, the decline is not observed in all groups. Select groups still have much higher smoking rates and thus bear an unequal burden of tobacco-related illnesses and deaths. Of important note, Asian American men as a combined group have a higher smoking rate than non-Hispanic Whites (22% vs. 18%, respectively); in particular, the highest smoking prevalence has been observed in Vietnamese (31%) and Korean (30%) men among major Asian subgroups. Research also shows that smoking rates are higher for Asian American men with low acculturation (e.g., immigrant status, low English proficiency) than for those who are more acculturated; yet the reverse trend is observed in Asian American women. These findings underscore the need for more targeted tobacco control efforts. The scientific literature suggests that provider advice to quit smoking can influence a smoker's decision to quit. However, research has shown that Asian Americans are less likely to receive such provider advice. Providers often have very limited face-time with patients during the short clinic visit, which presents a challenge as to whether they can incorporate smoking cessation messages during the visit. Overall, little research has focused on smoking cessation in the clinic setting, particularly research that focuses on Asian Americans. The purpose of the pilot study was to develop a more streamlined smoking cessation intervention that can be integrated into the clinic visit, especially to maximize the time when patients are waiting to see their providers. The research question was whether providing culturally appropriate video education that includes provider advice and was tailored to a patient's readiness for quitting smoking will increase whether a patient receives smoking cessation education according to the recommended Clinical Practice Guideline and whether this results in a decrease in tobacco use in low-income Vietnamese and Korean patients. Using a community-based participatory research approach, the investigators created the iMD that delivers tailored in-language video messages via a mobile tablet to Korean and Vietnamese male smokers right before their clinic visit with a provider. iMD delivers the "5 A's" and generates a bilingual tailored printout. Participants were Korean- and Vietnamese-speaking patients who self-identify as daily smokers and receive primary care at a federally-qualified health center. This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of iMD from the patients' perspectives. This study examined patient-provider discussion on tobacco use from patients' self-report and electronic health record (EHR), and self-reported quit attempts and smoking abstinence at 3 months post iMD visit.

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 47 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Practice-based Intervention for Vietnamese and Korean Patients
Study Start Date : August 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : July 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Quitting Smoking

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Smoking Cessation Group
Patients received the interactive mobile doctor (iMD) intervention.
Behavioral: Interactive Mobile Doctor ("iMD")
iMD delivers tailored interactive video education via a mobile tablet to smoking patients right before their clinic visit with a provider. iMD delivers the "5 A's" (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) and generates a bilingual tailored printout, which aims to increase patient-provider discussion on tobacco use and to promote smoking cessation. This version of iMD delivers the intervention in Korean or Vietnamese languages as preferred by the patient.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Participation Rate [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    proportion of eligible participants consent to participate

  2. Acceptability [ Time Frame: through study completion, an average of 1 year ]
    proportion of participants who rated the intervention as moderately to extremely satisfied


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Patient-provider discussion [ Time Frame: "through study completion, an average of 1 year ]
    self-reported by patient whether discussion on tobacco use took place at the indexed clinical encounter

  2. Physician delivery of 5As [ Time Frame: "through study completion, an average of 1 year ]
    EHR-documented physician's delivery of assess, advice, assist, or arrange at the indexed clinical encounter

  3. Quit attempt [ Time Frame: 3-month ]
    self-reported at least one or more 24 hour quit attempts

  4. Abstinence [ Time Frame: 3-month ]
    self-reported 7-day point prevalent smoking abstinence



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • current smokers identified on electronic health records (EHR)
  • have a scheduled primary care visit during the recruitment period

Exclusion Criteria:

  • already quit smoking or not smoking daily in the past 7 days
  • had already quit smoking or not smoking daily in the past 7 days
  • had canceled or rescheduled their primary care visit outside of the study period

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03064724


Sponsors and Collaborators
Asian Health Services
University of California, San Francisco
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Thu Quach, PhD, MPH Asian Health Services
Principal Investigator: Janice Tsoh University of California, San Francisco
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Thu Quach, Director of Community Health and Research, Asian Health Services
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03064724    
Other Study ID Numbers: 21BT-0056
First Posted: February 27, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 27, 2017
Last Verified: February 2017
Keywords provided by Thu Quach, Asian Health Services:
smoking
tobacco use
Asian
patients
provider advice
digital health intervention