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Trial record 88 of 89 for:    DESVENLAFAXINE

Effects of Treatment on Decision-making in Major Depression

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01916824
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 6, 2013
Results First Posted : October 20, 2017
Last Update Posted : November 21, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Boadie W. Dunlop, Emory University

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE August 3, 2013
First Posted Date  ICMJE August 6, 2013
Results First Submitted Date  ICMJE September 20, 2017
Results First Posted Date  ICMJE October 20, 2017
Last Update Posted Date November 21, 2017
Study Start Date  ICMJE August 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date December 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: September 20, 2017)
Money Earned [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 6 ]
Change in amount of money earned between baseline and after 6 weeks of antidepressant treatment is determined through a summary score from a variety of decision-making tasks. Participants received between $5 and $40 per visit, depending on the outcomes of the decisions made on the computerized tasks. Variable payment ensured that the decision-making tasks were approached realistically, as opposed to using hypothetical "points" that do not have meaning in the real world. Greater earnings indicate better financial decision-making. The specific tasks were:
  1. risk task
  2. balloon analogue risk task
  3. temporal discounting task
  4. ultimatum game
  5. continuous performance task
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: August 3, 2013)
Money Earned [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
Change in amount of money earned between baseline and after 6 weeks of antidepressant treatment
Change History Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01916824 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Effects of Treatment on Decision-making in Major Depression
Official Title  ICMJE Effects of Treatment on Decision-making in Major Depression
Brief Summary In this trial, fifty participants with current major depressive disorder who are not receiving an antidepressant medication and fifty healthy controls will complete questionnaires and computerized tasks to assess their decision-making styles. There will be three visits for depressed patients and two for healthy controls (the first and third visits). The first visit will involve interviews and questionnaires to assess the participant's level of depression, medical history and quality of life. Participants will then complete the decision-making tasks, and will earn between $5-40 based on their choices, in order to make the decisions on the computer tasks financially meaningful. At the completion of this visit, depressed patients will be prescribed an FDA-approved antidepressant, chosen in consultation with the treating psychiatrist. Patients will be responsible for paying for the prescription themselves. After two weeks on the medication, the patient will be seen for a follow-up visit to ensure tolerability of the medicine. After six weeks on the medicine, patients and healthy controls will return to repeat the questionnaires and the computer based decision-making tasks, and will again earn between $5-40 based on their performance.
Detailed Description

During episodes of depression patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may make sub-optimal decisions based on exaggerated negative beliefs about themselves, the future, or the world around them. These disruptions in decision-making contribute adversely to quality of life, in both work and personal realms. Although effective treatments for depression are available, very little work has explored the effects of treatment on how people make decisions. The specific aspects of decision-making that differ between depressed and health control individuals are unknown, and whether any changes in these decision-making features occur as a result of improvement from depression, or whether medication treatment itself can lead to changes in decision-making, even in the absence of clinical improvement.

In this trial, fifty participants with current major depressive disorder who are not receiving an antidepressant medication and fifty healthy controls will complete questionnaires and computerized tasks to assess their decision-making styles. There will be three visits for depressed patients and two for healthy controls (the first and third visits). The first visit will involve interviews and questionnaires to assess the participant's level of depression, medical history and quality of life. Participants will then complete the decision-making tasks, and will earn between $5-40 based on their choices, in order to make the decisions on the computer tasks financially meaningful. At the completion of this visit, depressed patients will be prescribed an FDA-approved antidepressant, chosen in consultation with the treating psychiatrist. Patients will be responsible for paying for the prescription themselves. After two weeks on the medication, the patient will be seen for a follow-up visit to ensure tolerability of the medicine. After six weeks on the medicine, patients and healthy controls will return to repeat the questionnaires and the computer based decision-making tasks, and will again earn between $5-40 based on their performance.

The overall goal of this study will be to identify whether decision-making characteristics in people with major depression is affected by treatment, and whether depressed patients make decisions differently from healthy controls. A total of 4 decision-making tasks and one control task will be administered via computer to eligible subjects. The specific tasks are:

  1. Risk Task - This task assesses tolerance of risk by having participants decide whether they wish to accept a specific dollar payout, or to play a lottery with an uncertain payout.
  2. Balloon Analogue Risk Task - The participant is presented with a balloon and offered the chance to earn money by pumping the balloon up by clicking a button. Each click causes the balloon to incrementally inflate and money to be added to a counter up until some threshold, at which point the balloon is over inflated and explodes. Thus, each pump confers greater risk but also greater potential reward. If the participant chooses to cash-out prior to the balloon exploding then they collect the money earned for that trial, but if balloon explodes earnings for that trial are lost. Participants are not informed about the balloons breakpoints; the absence of this information allows for testing both participants' initial responses to the task and changes in responding as they gain experience with the task contingencies.
  3. Temporal Discounting Task - Participants are initially asked to choose between taking an immediate reward now or a larger reward at some time in the future. Decisions for seven time points over a 10-year time frame are proposed. The task is then repeated using choices between immediate and delayed losses, based on the same seven time points. This task assesses the manner in which subjects value immediate outcomes compared to long-term consequences.
  4. Ultimatum Game - The ultimatum game (UG) is a well-established game-theoretical paradigm commonly employed in behavioral economics to measure emotional reactions to unfair offers. In the UG, two subjects sequentially exchange real monetary amounts. Specifically, a proposer is provided with a sum of money by the experimenter ($10), and asked to share this amount of money with another player, the responder. The responder then decides whether to accept or reject the offer made by the proposer. If the responder accepts the offer, both players receive the respective amounts from the proposer's offer. If she rejects the offer made by the proposer, both players receive nothing ($0). This is best illustrated via the following two potential scenarios: 1. the proposer offers a fair split of $5 for himself and $5 for the responder. This is an offer that is typically accepted by a great majority of responders. 2. The proposer offers a split of $9 for himself and $1 for the responder. Such offers are commonly rejected by the majority of responders, despite incurring a financial loss of $1.
  5. Continuous Performance Task - This task involves identifying patterns of numbers briefly displayed on a computer screen. This task will serve as a control variable for attention in analyzing the results of the decision-making tasks.
Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Phase 4
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Condition  ICMJE
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Healthy Controls
Intervention  ICMJE Drug: Any FDA Approved Antidepressant
Any FDA-approved antidepressant prescribed within standard dose range to treat Major Depressive Disorder will be taken for 6 weeks. Psychiatric follow-up will be performed during the study participation. At the end of the study, these participants will receive assistance in transitioning their care to another provider, depending on their individual circumstances.
Other Names:
  • Sertraline, Zoloft
  • Citalopram, Celexa
  • Escitalopram, Lexapro
  • Paroxetine, Paxil
  • Fluoxetine, Prozac
  • Vilazodone, Viibryd
  • Venlafaxine XR, Effexor XR
  • Desvenlafaxine, Pristiq
  • Duloxetine, Cymbalta
  • Bupropion, Wellbutrin
  • Mirtazapine, Remeron
Study Arms  ICMJE
  • Experimental: Participants with Major Depressive Disorder
    Persons with a primary diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder who start taking any FDA-approved antidepressant prescribed within standard dose range for 6 weeks
    Intervention: Drug: Any FDA Approved Antidepressant
  • No Intervention: Healthy Controls
    Persons without a history of Major Depressive Disorder and without a current diagnosis of any mental illness
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Actual Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: September 20, 2017)
53
Original Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: August 3, 2013)
100
Actual Study Completion Date  ICMJE December 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date December 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria for MDD Subjects:

  1. Male or female, age 18-65
  2. Primary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV TR) Diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder.
  3. Has a 17-item Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) score >=16.
  4. Ability to visually read and understand English language
  5. Not currently taking an antidepressant.
  6. Women of reproductive potential must be willing to take a medically approved form of birth control throughout the duration of the study.

Inclusion Criteria for Healthy Control Subjects:

  1. Male or female, age 18-65
  2. No current DSM-IV TR diagnosis of a mental illness.
  3. No lifetime history of Major Depressive Disorder or Dysthymia.
  4. Has a 17-item Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) score ≤7.
  5. Ability to visually read and understand English language
  6. Not currently taking any psychoactive medication

Exclusion Criteria for all subjects:

  1. Has met criteria at any time during their life for bipolar disorder, a primary psychotic disorder (e.g. schizophrenia), or dementia.
  2. Meet criteria for substance abuse or dependence within three months of the screening visit.
  3. Presents with a clinically significant suicide risk, as assessed by a study physician.
  4. Presence of any unstable or central nervous system-related medical illness that would interfere with cognition or participation.
  5. Women who are currently pregnant or lactating, or plan to become pregnant during the study.
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE Yes
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT01916824
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE IRB00066705
Has Data Monitoring Committee No
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party Boadie W. Dunlop, Emory University
Study Sponsor  ICMJE Emory University
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: Boadie W Dunlop, MD Emory University
PRS Account Emory University
Verification Date October 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP