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The Role of Personal Identity in Psychotic Symptoms: a Study With the Repertory Grid Technique

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03820362
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 29, 2019
Last Update Posted : January 29, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu
Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca, Catalunya, Spain
Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional, Spain
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Helena García Mieres, University of Barcelona

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date January 22, 2019
First Posted Date January 29, 2019
Last Update Posted Date January 29, 2019
Actual Study Start Date February 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date November 2018   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures
 (submitted: January 25, 2019)
  • Self-ideal discrepancy, RGT [ Time Frame: 2 hours ]
    Self-esteem. Possible range: 0-0,60. Higher values represent a worse outcome
  • Self-others discrepancy, RGT [ Time Frame: 2 hours ]
    Perceived social isolation. Possible range: 0-0,60. Higher values represent a worse outcome
  • Interpersonal construct differentiation, RGT [ Time Frame: 2 hours ]
    Percentage of Variance Accounted for the First Factor. Possible range: 0-100. Higher values represent a worse outcome
  • Polarization, RGT [ Time Frame: 2 hours ]
    Dichotomous thinking style in the interpersonal context. Possible range: 0-100. Higher values represent a worse outcome
  • Number of elicited constructs, RGT [ Time Frame: 2 hours ]
    Quantity of constructs that the person is able to express to describe self and others. Possible range: 10-50. Higher values represent a better outcome
  • Psychotic symptoms (PANSS, Kay et al. 1987; Peralta & Cuesta, 1994). [ Time Frame: 40 minutes ]
    Positive and negative symptoms of psychosis. Range: 7-112. Higher values represent a worse outcome.
  • Metacognition: BCIS (Beck et al. 2004; Gutiérrez-Zotes et al. 2012); Garety et al, 1991; Dudley et al, 1997) [ Time Frame: 15 minutes ]
    Cognitive insight. Range: 0-45. Higher values represent a better outcome
  • Theory of mind: the Hinting Task (Corcoran et al., 1995; Gil-Sanz et al., 2012) [ Time Frame: 5 minutes ]
    Possible range: 0-12. Higher values represent a better outcome
  • General intellectual functioning (WAIS) [ Time Frame: 20 minutes ]
    vocabulary subscale. Range: 70-140. Higher values represent a better outcome
  • Executive functioning: WSCT (Bergs et al., 1948) [ Time Frame: 15 minutes ]
    Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Categories completed and perseverative errors. Higher values represent a better outcome
Original Primary Outcome Measures Same as current
Change History No Changes Posted
Current Secondary Outcome Measures
 (submitted: January 25, 2019)
  • Sociodemographical data [ Time Frame: 10 minutes ]
    Gender, chronicity, antipsychotic dosage, diagnosis, age, marital status, education level, employment situation
  • Depressive symptoms [ Time Frame: 10 minutes ]
    Beck Depression Inventory (Beck et al. 1996; Sanz, Perdigón & Vázquez, 2003). Range_ 0-63. High values represent a worse outcome.
  • General functioning [ Time Frame: 5 minutes ]
    Global Assessment of Functioning (Endicot et al., 1976). Range: 0-100. Higher values represent a better outcome.
  • Self-esteem [ Time Frame: 5 minutes ]
    Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Martín Albó et al., 2007). Range: 0-40. Higher values represent a better outcome
  • Social functioning [ Time Frame: 20 minutes ]
    Social Functioning Scale (Birchwood et al., 1990; Torres & Olivares, 2000). Range: Range: 45-195
  • Psychological distress [ Time Frame: 10 minutes ]
    CORE-OM (Evans et al., 2002; Trujillo et al., 2016). Range: 0-4. Higher values represent a worse outcome
  • Jumping to Conclusions [ Time Frame: 15 minutes ]
    The beads task (Garety et al., 1991; Dudley et al, 1997). Dichotomous: yes/no. A "yes" represents a worse outcome
Original Secondary Outcome Measures Same as current
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title The Role of Personal Identity in Psychotic Symptoms: a Study With the Repertory Grid Technique
Official Title Personal Identity, Cognitive Factors and Psychotic Symptoms in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders: A Cross-sectional Study With the Repertory Grid Technique
Brief Summary Personal identity is being recently recognized as a core element for mental health disorders, with relevant clinical implications. However, scarcity of data exists on its role in schizophrenia and related disorders. The repertory grid (RGT), a technique derived from personal construct theory, has been used in different clinical and non-clinical contexts for the study of the construction perception of self and others, to appreciate aspects of interpersonal construing such as polarization and differentiation (unidimensional thinking) or self-construction.and Our study aims to explore the potential influence of the structure of personal identity and of other relevant cognitive factors (social cognition, metacognition, neurocognition) in positive and negative symptoms in people suffering schizophrenia and related disorders.
Detailed Description

Over recent years, the importance of the sense of self and personal identity in psychopathology and its treatment has been highlighted. Several studies inspired in the Personal Construct Psychology framework have found a variety of identity characteristics in clinical conditions such as depression or eating disorders, but the evidence in schizophrenia and other psychotic related disorders is scarce.

In addition, current psychological models of positive and negative symptoms highlight the influence of neurocognition, social cognition and self-concepts in the development and maintenance of psychotic experiences. Despite the recognized need of person-centered approaches to understand psychopathology processes in psychosis, psychological models for explaining psychotic symptoms have not explored sufficiently the role of this kind of person-centered measures.

Aim

1. To examine the influence of the structure of personal identity and other relevant cognitive factors in positive and negative symptoms

Hypotheses

  1. Positive symptoms will be influenced by dichotomous thinking style and construction of self as measured with the RGT.
  2. Negative symptoms will be affected by the richness of the construct system as measured with the RGT.
Study Type Observational
Study Design Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Target Follow-Up Duration Not Provided
Biospecimen Not Provided
Sampling Method Non-Probability Sample
Study Population Patients recruited from the community, suffering schizophrenia and related disorder
Condition
  • Schizophrenia
  • Psychotic Disorders
  • Self
Intervention Not Provided
Study Groups/Cohorts Not Provided
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status Completed
Actual Enrollment
 (submitted: January 25, 2019)
85
Original Actual Enrollment Same as current
Actual Study Completion Date November 2018
Actual Primary Completion Date November 2018   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • diagnosis of schizophrenia, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified, delusional disorder, schizoaffective disorder, brief psychotic disorder, or schizophreniform disorder
  • age between 18 and 60 years.
  • patients from outpatient mental health units

Exclusion Criteria:

  • traumatic brain injury, dementia, or intellectual disability (pre-morbid IQ <70)
  • current substance dependence
Sex/Gender
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages 18 Years to 60 Years   (Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers No
Contacts Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries Spain
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number NCT03820362
Other Study ID Numbers FPU15/01721
Has Data Monitoring Committee Yes
U.S. FDA-regulated Product
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
IPD Sharing Statement
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Responsible Party Helena García Mieres, University of Barcelona
Study Sponsor University of Barcelona
Collaborators
  • Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu
  • Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca, Catalunya, Spain
  • Ministerio de Educación y Formación Profesional, Spain
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Helena García-Mieres, MsC Universitat de Barcelona & Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu
Study Director: Susana Ochoa, PhD Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu
Study Director: Guillem Feixas, PhD University of Barcelona
PRS Account University of Barcelona
Verification Date January 2019