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Improving Oral Health With Serious Games (AOTSM)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02027597
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 6, 2014
Last Update Posted : January 6, 2014
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jacqueline E. Pickrell, University of Washington

January 2, 2014
January 6, 2014
January 6, 2014
October 2008
December 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Self-Efficacy [ Time Frame: 8 months post treatment ]
Follow-up surveys were conducted at 3 points after the intervention for all groups. The survey included questions about the children's attitudes (self-efficacy) toward oral health and taking care of their teeth. Surveys were paper-pencil self-reports from both parents and children. Items were drawn from Morowatisharifabad and Shirazi, (2007) and adapted for ease of understanding for English speaking children.
Same as current
No Changes Posted
Self-care behavior [ Time Frame: 8 months post treatment ]
Separate surveys of children and their parents were conducted at 3 points after the intervention all groups. The survey included questions about how often and how well the children took care of their teeth.
Same as current
Oral health literacy [ Time Frame: 8 months post treatment ]
we assessed children's oral health knowledge in two ways. First, children reported their overall oral health knowledge using three-point rating scales (=not really to 3=mostly) to respond to six items, including, "By brushing and flossing my teeth, I am less susceptible to tooth decay." Negatively worded items were reverse-coded, and the estimated internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the pre-game survey was.49. Second, children indicated their brushing knowledge using five-point rating scales (1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree) to respond to four items, including "Tooth brushing gets rid of bad breath."
Same as current
 
Improving Oral Health With Serious Games
Improving Oral Health With Serious Games

This study investigated if computer games can be effective at changing the way children take care of their teeth. We a museum exhibit with 3D virtual reality games called "Attack of the S. Mutans!" Our hypothesis was that children who played the games and visited the exhibit would show improved attitudes about oral health, which would translate into improved brushing and self-care habits.

In this randomized controlled study with school children aged 8-12, we compared the outcomes for three groups: Group 1) Visited Attack of the S. Mutans!; Group 2) Experienced a hands-on classroom presentation about virtual reality being used for healthcare; Group 3) Received no-treatment.

Not Provided
Interventional
Not Applicable
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Caries
  • Tooth Decay
  • Cavities
  • Gingivitis
  • Other: Attack of the S. Mutans
    A research assistant led groups of students through the Attack of the S. Mutans exhibit. All participants played all the games and viewed all the graphical content of the exhibit.
    Other Name: AOTSM
  • Other: Follow-up
    This group experienced the Attack of the S. Mutans! exhibit and 3 doses of follow-up booster content at a web site.
  • Other: SnowWorld
    SnowWorld is a 3D first-person-shooter game developed by Firsthand Technology. In SnowWorld, the player shoots snowballs at penguins, polar bears, and other features of a frozen landscape. The game is designed to help burn victims cope with pain, and has no oral health messages.
  • Experimental: Video Game Treatment
    This group received the AOTSM game experience followed by additional oral health information. They did not receive any follow-up treatment after the exhibit.
    Intervention: Other: Attack of the S. Mutans
  • Active Comparator: Control
    Instead of playing Attack of the S. Mutans!, children in the control group attended a 90 minute classroom session about virtual reality applications for relieving pain and for therapy. This content was unrelated to oral health.
    Intervention: Other: SnowWorld
  • Experimental: Video Game Treatment Plus Follow-Up
    Children assigned to the Treatment-Plus conditions not only had the Attack of the S. Mutans video game experience, but also gained access to an educational website that reinforced the exhibit's teachings two months later. These students received a special login and password in the mail and were instructed to visit the site before completing their next questionnaire.
    Interventions:
    • Other: Attack of the S. Mutans
    • Other: Follow-up
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
161
Same as current
August 2011
December 2010   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

For participation in the study, enrollment criteria are as follows: 1) a dentist's diagnosis of tooth decay, or restorative dental work in the previous year; and 2) Parents or guardians provide usable baseline data, including contact information for follow-up questionnaires.

Exclusion Criteria:

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
8 Years to 12 Years   (Child)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT02027597
35095-EB
5R44DE019043-02 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Jacqueline E. Pickrell, University of Washington
University of Washington
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
  • National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Principal Investigator: Howard A Rose, M.Ed. Firsthand Technology
Principal Investigator: Ari J Hollander, MSE Firsthand Technology
University of Washington
January 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP