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Efficacy of Antituberculous Therapy in Management of Sarcoidosis

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01245036
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 22, 2010
Last Update Posted : May 15, 2013
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ritesh Agarwal, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE November 15, 2010
First Posted Date  ICMJE November 22, 2010
Last Update Posted Date May 15, 2013
Study Start Date  ICMJE January 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date December 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: November 19, 2010)
Remission rates [ Time Frame: Three months ]
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Same as current
Change History
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: November 19, 2010)
  • Relapse rates in the two groups [ Time Frame: six and 12 months after completion of treatment ]
  • Treatment related adverse effects in the two groups. [ Time Frame: Through out ]
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Same as current
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Efficacy of Antituberculous Therapy in Management of Sarcoidosis
Official Title  ICMJE Rifampicin and Isoniazid Along With Prednisolone Compared to Prednisolone Alone in Treatment of Sarcoidosis: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Brief Summary From the time sarcoidosis has been described, there has always been a belief that the disease is in some way related to tuberculosis. If indeed tuberculosis is a causal factor in sarcoidosis, then the hypothesis can be further reinforced, if anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) is useful in treatment of sarcoidosis. Very few trials have been conducted in the past but the results of these trials have been discouraging. These trials were generally small studies and limited by time bias and used older regimens based on isoniazid, amino-salicylic acid and streptomycin. In our experience nearly one third of patients who are finally diagnosed to have sarcoidosis, have received ATT for variable length of time, but its impact of final outcome of sarcoidosis has not been studied. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Rifampicin and Isoniazid along with prednisolone compared to prednisolone alone in treatment of Sarcoidosis.
Detailed Description

Sarcoidosis has evolved from the position of a disease of relative obscurity in the tropics, towards an increasing recognition and reporting from India and around. From the time sarcoidosis has been described, there has always been a belief that the disease is in some way related to tuberculosis. However, the inability to identify mycobacteria by histologic staining or culture from pathologic tissues continues to be one of the strongest arguments against a potential role for mycobacteria. Of late, molecular analysis (such as polymerase chain reaction [PCR] techniques) for nucleic acids of the putative agents serves as an alternative method for isolating fastidious organisms. A recent meta-analysis suggested a 30% prevalence rate of mycobacterial DNA in sarcoid samples but the individual studies reported detection rates from 0-50%. Moreover, most of these studies were published from countries with low prevalence for tuberculosis. If indeed mycobacteria are etiologically linked to sarcoidosis then the detection rates for mycobacterial DNA in sarcoid samples would be higher in countries with high prevalence of TB. In a recent prospective case-control study aimed at detection of mycobacterial DNA in patients with sarcoidosis from India, reinforced the hypothesis by showing mycobacterial DNA with PCR for 65 kDa protein gene in 48% of samples (BAL or biopsy) from freshly diagnosed patients of sarcoidosis.

There are numerous factors that favor mycobacteria being a trigger for sarcoidosis. These include histopathological appearances of the granulomas 15, reports of mycobacterial disease either existing coincidentally, succeeding or antedating sarcoidosis and the finding of mycobacteria in occasional granulomas of sarcoidosis.Passage experiments have also suggested that mycobacteria with characteristics of M. tuberculosis may be the incriminating agent.Recent studies on humoral immunity to mycobacterial antigens from sarcoidosis patients have renewed interest in a potential of mycobacteria in sarcoidosis. It has been shown that mycobacterial ESAT-6 and katG are recognized by sarcoidosis CD4+ T cells when presented by known sarcoidosis susceptibility allele, DRB1*1101. It is possible that the presence of mycobacterial infection or BCG vaccination in genetically predisposed host may be involved in the development of autoimmunity.It has also been suggested that the organism might exist in a cell wall deficient L-form and may be difficult to isolate.

This possible link not only has implications in the differential diagnosis of the two common conditions, it may also have some therapeutic implications. Reactivation of tuberculosis after cortico-steroid treatment is instituted for sarcoidosis is a genuine concern, given the high prevalence of latent infection in our country. If indeed tuberculosis is a causal factor in sarcoidosis, then the hypothesis can be further reinforced, if anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) is useful in treatment of sarcoidosis. Very few trials have been conducted in the past but the results of these trials have been discouraging. These trials were generally small studies and limited by time bias and used older regimens based on isoniazid, amino-salicylic acid and streptomycin. In our experience nearly one third of patients who are finally diagnosed to have sarcoidosis, have received ATT for variable length of time, but its impact of final outcome of sarcoidosis has not been studied.

The aim of this prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Rifampicin and Isoniazid along with prednisolone compared to prednisolone alone in treatment of Sarcoidosis.

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Not Applicable
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Condition  ICMJE
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Tuberculosis
Intervention  ICMJE Drug: Antituberculous therapy along with steroids
INH (300 mg/day) plus Rifampicin (450 mg/day if wt.<50 kg and 600 mg/day if wt. >50 kg) for six months Prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks (maximum 80 mg) Prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks (maximum 60 mg) Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day for 3 months (maximum 40 mg) Prednisolone 0.25 mg/kg/day for 3 months (maximum 20 mg) Taper over the next three months Prednisolone 0.25 mg/kg EOD for 15 days Prednisolone 0.125 mg/kg EOD for 15 days Then taper by 5 mg every 15 days to complete one year
Study Arms  ICMJE Active Comparator: Glucocorticoid arm
Prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks (maximum 60 mg) Prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks (maximum 40 mg) Prednisolone 0.25 mg/kg/day for 6 months (maximum 20 mg) Taper over the next three months Prednisolone 0.25 mg/kg EOD for 15 days Prednisolone 0.125 mg/kg EOD for 15 days Then taper by 5 mg every 15 days to complete one year
Intervention: Drug: Antituberculous therapy along with steroids
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Actual Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: November 19, 2010)
100
Original Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE Same as current
Actual Study Completion Date  ICMJE March 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date December 2012   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

newly diagnosed sarcoidosis defined by presence of all of the following criteria:

  1. Presence with clinical features of pulmonary (dyspnea, dry cough, chest pain, fever, fatigue or crackles) or extra pulmonary organ (lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin, eyes, heart, etc.) involvement and consistent radiological involvement and
  2. Compact non-caseating granulomas on trans-bronchial biopsy which are tissue AFB smear-negative

Exclusion Criteria:

Patients who have received glucocorticoid treatment before initial evaluation by us, or with presence of concomitant other cardio pulmonary disease will be excluded.

Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 15 Years to 75 Years   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE No
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE India
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT01245036
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE Sarc/Att/01
Has Data Monitoring Committee Yes
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party Ritesh Agarwal, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
Study Sponsor  ICMJE Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: Dheeraj Gupta PGIMER, Chandigarh
PRS Account Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
Verification Date May 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP