Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Effects of a Worksite Parenting Program

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00465010
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 24, 2007
Last Update Posted : October 18, 2011
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
University of California, Los Angeles
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
RAND

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE April 23, 2007
First Posted Date  ICMJE April 24, 2007
Last Update Posted Date October 18, 2011
Study Start Date  ICMJE April 2002
Actual Primary Completion Date March 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: October 14, 2011)
Parent-child communication [ Time Frame: 0, 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, 33, 39, & 45 months post-intervention ]
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: April 23, 2007)
Parent-child communication
Change History
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: October 14, 2011)
  • Parenting behaviors [ Time Frame: 0, 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, 33, 39, & 45 months post-intervention ]
  • Adolescent health behaviors [ Time Frame: 0, 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, 33, 39, & 45 months post-intervention ]
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: April 23, 2007)
  • Parenting behaviors
  • Adolescent health behaviors
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Effects of a Worksite Parenting Program
Official Title  ICMJE Talking Parents, Healthy Teens: A Worksite-Based Parenting Program for Parents of Adolescents
Brief Summary Many adolescents in the U.S., even very young adolescents, are engaging in sexual risk behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unintended pregnancy. Studies show that parents can play a significant role in promoting healthy sexual development and risk reduction among adolescents. The UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion has developed Talking Parents, Healthy Teens, a worksite-based parenting program for parents of adolescents (grades 6-10) to improve parent-adolescent communication and reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors. We are evaluating the effectiveness of the program primarily with confidential surveys of the participants before and after the program.
Detailed Description

Many adolescents in the U.S., even very young adolescents, are engaging in sexual risk behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unintended pregnancy. Studies show that parents can play a significant role in promoting healthy sexual development and risk reduction among adolescents. Parenting approaches such as engaging in open and responsive communication, providing appropriate levels of supervision, and keeping involved in children's lives are associated with better adolescent outcomes. However, many parents are uncertain about how to talk with their adolescents about sex. Worksites provide an untapped but promising setting in which to reach parents to help them develop parenting and communication skills.

The UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion has developed a worksite-based parenting program for parents of adolescents (grades 6-10) to improve parent-adolescent communication and reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors. Specifically, the Center has developed Talking Parents, Healthy Teens for parents with adolescent children to teach communication skills as well as basic facts about sex and other important adolescent issues. The program aims to help parents understand adolescent development and the changes in adolescents' thoughts and feelings about sexual issues and other risk behaviors. It helps parents develop skills for discussing sensitive but important topics with their adolescents, and for teaching their adolescents decision-making and problem-solving skills. The program also emphasizes the importance of parents knowing what is going on in their adolescents' lives (often called parental monitoring). Although parents feel a need for help on such issues, they often tend to be too busy to attend ongoing programs. Therefore, we bring the program to them at their worksite. The program involves groups of about 12-15 parents who meet for an hour at lunch-time once a week for eight consecutive weeks. We serve a free lunch during the sessions.

We are evaluating the effectiveness of the Talking Parents, Healthy Teens program primarily with confidential surveys of the participants before and after the program. We also ask participants' adolescents (who are not in the parenting program) to fill out surveys as well. Among parents who initially express interest in the program, we randomize parents after they complete their baseline survey into an intervention group that takes the parenting program and a control group that does not. Both of these groups fill out confidential surveys over the course of several years. After the study has been conducted at a number of worksites, the research team will statistically compare survey answers for the two groups to see how well the program works. The results of the evaluation will be submitted for publication in academic journals.

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Not Applicable
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Condition  ICMJE Adolescent Sexual Risk Behaviors
Intervention  ICMJE Behavioral: Talking Parents, Healthy Teens
Talking Parents, Healthy Teens is a worksite-based parenting program to help parents of 6th-10th graders learn to promote their adolescents' healthy sexual development. The program is administered in 8 weekly one-hour sessions during the lunch hour to groups of about 15 parents and focuses on parent-adolescent relationships and communication, with an emphasis on promoting sexual health and reducing sexual risk. It is led by a trained facilitator and assistant facilitator.
Study Arms  ICMJE Not Provided
Publications *

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Actual Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: October 14, 2011)
1252
Original Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: April 23, 2007)
1300
Actual Study Completion Date  ICMJE March 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date March 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parents of adolescents in grades 6-10
  • Parents must spend at least two days per week with their adolescents
  • One parent per household/family
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 11 Years to 70 Years   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE Yes
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT00465010
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE R01MH061202( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
Has Data Monitoring Committee No
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party RAND
Study Sponsor  ICMJE RAND
Collaborators  ICMJE
  • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • University of California, Los Angeles
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: Mark A. Schuster, MD, PhD RAND and UCLA
PRS Account RAND
Verification Date October 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP