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Dietary Variety Versus Dietary Fat Effects in Energy Intake

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00285571
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 2, 2006
Last Update Posted : March 18, 2010
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE January 31, 2006
First Posted Date  ICMJE February 2, 2006
Last Update Posted Date March 18, 2010
Study Start Date  ICMJE September 2005
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: March 9, 2006)
Change in energy intake at two weeks.
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Change History Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00285571 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE
 (submitted: March 9, 2006)
Two week changes in body weight, fat, taste preferences, nutrient composition of self-selected dietary intake, eating patterns of self-selected dietary intake.
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Dietary Variety Versus Dietary Fat Effects in Energy Intake
Official Title  ICMJE Dietary Variety vs Dietary Fat Effects on Energy Intake
Brief Summary

The relative importance of dietary patterns vs. macronutrient composition in affecting energy intake and body weight remains uncertain. In this study we propose to investigate the relative effects of dietary variety vs dietary fat on voluntary energy intake in adults. We will quantify and compare the effects of typical ranges of variety & fat intakes in the American diet on voluntary energy intake. The primary hypotheses to be tested are 1)an increasing availability of entree/side/snack/dessert variety offered will significantly increase voluntary energy intake in a dose-response fashion when other dietary factors known to influence energy intake are held constant. 2)The separate effects of dietary variety & dietary fat on energy intake will be similar.

We anticipate that the results of this investigation will lead to a greater understanding of the relative importance of eating patterns versus macronutrient composition in the etiology of obesity, and more specifically, dietary variety versus dietary fat in determining energy intake. More importantly, it will help lay a foundation for improved dietary recommendations concerning weight loss and prevention of excess weight gain in adulthood.

Detailed Description

The relative importance of dietary patterns vs. macronutrient composition in affecting energy intake and body weight remains uncertain. In this study we propose to investigate the relative effects of dietary variety vs dietary fat on voluntary energy intake in adults. We will quantify and compare the effects of typical ranges of variety & fat intakes in the American diet on voluntary energy intake. The primary hypotheses to be tested are 1)an increasing availability of entree/side/snack/dessert variety offered will significantly increase voluntary energy intake in a dose-response fashion when other dietary factors known to influence energy intake are held constant. 2)The separate effects of dietary variety & dietary fat on energy intake will be similar.

We anticipate that the results of this investigation will lead to a greater understanding of the relative importance of eating patterns versus macronutrient composition in the etiology of obesity, and more specifically, dietary variety versus dietary fat in determining energy intake. More importantly, it will help lay a foundation for improved dietary recommendations concerning weight loss and prevention of excess weight gain in adulthood

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Phase 1
Phase 2
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Condition  ICMJE Healthy
Intervention  ICMJE Behavioral: Controlled Feeding Intervention
Study Arms  ICMJE Not Provided
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: February 1, 2006)
64
Original Enrollment  ICMJE Same as current
Actual Study Completion Date  ICMJE September 2007
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE Inclusion Criteria: Healthy adults age 18-5 y with BMI 20-35 kg/m
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years to 50 Years   (Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE Yes
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT00285571
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE DK62400 (completed 2007)
Has Data Monitoring Committee Not Provided
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party Not Provided
Study Sponsor  ICMJE National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: Megan McCrory, PhD Bastyr University
PRS Account National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Verification Date March 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP