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Evaluating Immune Function Tests in People With HIV

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00067795
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 28, 2003
Last Update Posted : November 22, 2010
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date August 27, 2003
First Posted Date August 28, 2003
Last Update Posted Date November 22, 2010
Study Start Date Not Provided
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Current Primary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Primary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Change History
Current Secondary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title Evaluating Immune Function Tests in People With HIV
Official Title HIV Antigen-Specific Immune Responses - A Comparison of Alternative In Vitro Assays From Subjects Characterized as Either "Stable HAART" or "Efficient Immune Control"
Brief Summary Some people's immune systems are able to control HIV infection without anti-HIV drugs. Other people with HIV must take drugs to prevent the virus from destroying their immune systems. There are many different laboratory tests that measure immune function in people with HIV. This study will compare some of these tests to see if they consistently measure differences between people who control the HIV without anti-HIV drugs and those who must take drugs.
Detailed Description

The efficiency of the immune response to HIV antigens is the critical feature that allows some individuals with chronic HIV infection to maintain low level viremia (less than 3000 copies/ml). The fundamental measurement of this response is the steady state level of viremia in the absence of antiretroviral drugs. However, using this clinical endpoint in vaccine and drug trials is time-consuming. Several laboratory assays of HIV T cell function have been developed to measure the key characteristics of an efficient immune response. This study will evaluate these assays in two distinct patient populations.

Two patient cohorts will be followed in this study. Cohort A will enroll patients who are stable on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). These patients will have been on the same HAART regimen for at least 9 months prior to study entry. Cohort B will enroll patients with chronic HIV infection and efficient immune control. These patients will have not been on any antiretroviral drugs for at least 6 months and will have viral loads less than 3,000 copies/ml. Participants in both cohorts will have blood drawn at study entry and Weeks 12 and 24. Blood samples will be used for CD4/CD8 cell count, plasma HIV-1 RNA, and immunologic assays.

Study Type Observational
Study Design Time Perspective: Prospective
Target Follow-Up Duration Not Provided
Biospecimen Not Provided
Sampling Method Not Provided
Study Population Not Provided
Condition HIV Infections
Intervention Not Provided
Study Groups/Cohorts Not Provided
Publications *

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status Completed
Enrollment
 (submitted: June¬†23,¬†2005)
54
Original Enrollment Same as current
Study Completion Date Not Provided
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for Cohorts A and B:

  • HIV-1 infection
  • CD4 cell count > 300 cells/mm3 within 60 days prior to study entry
  • Negative pregnancy test within 14 days of starting study
  • Agree to use acceptable methods of contraception while in study

Inclusion Criteria for Cohort A (Stable HAART) Only:

  • Stable HAART regimen, defined as the suppression of viral load to undetectable levels, for at least 9 months prior to study entry
  • Viral load < 75 copies/ml on at least three occasions within 9 months prior to study entry, with at least one of these values obtained between 6 and 9 months prior to study entry
  • No single viral load >= 75 copies/ml within 9 months prior to study entry

Inclusion Criteria for Cohort B (Efficient Immune Control) Only:

  • Not taking any antiretroviral drugs for at least 6 months prior to study entry
  • Meets study definition of efficient immune control (generally HIV-1 viral load < 3,000 copies/ml, with some exceptions)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnancy or breast-feeding
  • Active drug or alcohol use or dependence that, in the opinion of the investigator, would interfere with adherence to study requirements
  • History of an AIDS-defining opportunistic infection
Sex/Gender
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages 18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers No
Contacts Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number NCT00067795
Other Study ID Numbers ACTG A5181
Has Data Monitoring Committee Not Provided
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement Not Provided
Responsible Party Not Provided
Study Sponsor National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Collaborators Not Provided
Investigators
Study Chair: R. Pat Bucy, MD, PhD University of Alabama at Birmingham
PRS Account National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Verification Date November 2010