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Automated Calls With Nurse Follow-Up to Improve Diabetes Ambulatory Care

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00012753
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 16, 2001
Last Update Posted : April 7, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
VA Office of Research and Development ( US Department of Veterans Affairs )

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE March 14, 2001
First Posted Date  ICMJE March 16, 2001
Last Update Posted Date April 7, 2015
Study Start Date  ICMJE Not Provided
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Change History
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Automated Calls With Nurse Follow-Up to Improve Diabetes Ambulatory Care
Official Title  ICMJE Automated Calls With Nurse Follow-Up to Improve Diabetes Ambulatory Care
Brief Summary Regular outpatient follow-up is important for all diabetes patients, with some needing frequent attention because their health is unstable, their treatment regimen is complex, or their social supports are inadequate. However, many patients live with access barriers that limit their use of outpatient services, fail to attend outpatient appointments, and experience worse outcomes than trials of aggressive management suggest is possible. Although labor-intensive, telephone care programs are one potential strategy for bringing diabetes management services into patients� homes and improving their glycemic control. Automated telephone disease management (ATDM) systems can augment telephone care by providing frequent monitoring and health education to large patient panels while focusing clinicians� attention on individuals who need it most. Although this technology has shown some promise, it has not been rigorously evaluated, particularly in VA.
Detailed Description

Background:

Regular outpatient follow-up is important for all diabetes patients, with some needing frequent attention because their health is unstable, their treatment regimen is complex, or their social supports are inadequate. However, many patients live with access barriers that limit their use of outpatient services, fail to attend outpatient appointments, and experience worse outcomes than trials of aggressive management suggest is possible. Although labor-intensive, telephone care programs are one potential strategy for bringing diabetes management services into patients� homes and improving their glycemic control. Automated telephone disease management (ATDM) systems can augment telephone care by providing frequent monitoring and health education to large patient panels while focusing clinicians� attention on individuals who need it most. Although this technology has shown some promise, it has not been rigorously evaluated, particularly in VA.

Objectives:

This study evaluated Automated Telephone Disease Management (ATDM) calls with telephone nurse follow-up as a means of improving the quality of VA diabetes care. Specifically, we will determine whether this service improves patients' glucose control; improves other important outcomes such as their quality of life, satisfaction with care, and health service use; improves health behaviors such as self-monitoring of blood glucose, fat intake, and medication adherence; and has effects that vary across patient subgroups.

Methods:

Patients with diabetes mellitus using hypoglycemic medication were enrolled during outpatient visits to a university-affiliated VA health care system and randomized to usual care or bi-weekly ATDM assessment and self-care education calls with follow-up by a nurse educator. The intervention process was evaluated by examining patients� patterns of ATDM use and the reliability and validity of information they provided. Telephone surveys were used to measure intervention effects at 12-months on patients� self-care, symptoms, satisfaction with care, and perceived access barriers. The impact on VA utilization was evaluated using electronic utilization databases, and glycemic control was measured using laboratory tests. A total of 292 patients were randomized and 272 (93%) provided data at 12-months. Intervention patients completed ATDM assessments consistently throughout the observation period and the assessments identified groups of intervention patients with varying degrees of health risk at baseline. Compared to control patients, intervention patients at 12-months reported more frequent glucose self-monitoring, fewer access problems, and greater satisfaction with care (all p = 0.05). Intervention patients were more likely than controls to have been seen in podiatry clinics (53% versus 31%, p = 0.003) and diabetes specialty clinics (31% versus 17%, p = 0.03) during the study. The intervention did not influence mean endpoint HgA1c levels overall. However, among patients with baseline HgA1c = 8%, mean endpoint values among intervention and control patients were 8.7% and 9.2%, respectively (p = 0.05); intervention effects were even greater among patients with baseline HgA1c = 9%. Moreover, intervention patients at follow-up reported fewer symptoms of poor glycemic control than patients receiving usual care (3.6 versus 4.4, p = 0.03).

Status:

Completed.

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Phase 3
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Condition  ICMJE Diabetes
Intervention  ICMJE Procedure: Automated telephone health status assessments with nurse follow-up.
Study Arms  ICMJE Arm 1
Intervention: Procedure: Automated telephone health status assessments with nurse follow-up.
Publications *

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Estimated Enrollment  ICMJE
 (submitted: June¬†23,¬†2005)
272
Original Enrollment  ICMJE Same as current
Actual Study Completion Date  ICMJE December 1999
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

VA patients with diabetes taking hypoglycemic medications. Patients with serious mental disorders, no touch tone telephone, or a life expectancy of < 1 year were excluded.

Exclusion Criteria:

Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE No
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT00012753
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE IIR 95-084
Has Data Monitoring Committee No
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party VA Office of Research and Development ( US Department of Veterans Affairs )
Study Sponsor  ICMJE US Department of Veterans Affairs
Collaborators  ICMJE Not Provided
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: John D. Piette, PhD VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
PRS Account VA Office of Research and Development
Verification Date February 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP