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Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network Clinical Trial- Ciprofloxacin and Tamsulosin (CPCRN RCT1)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04552431
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 17, 2020
Last Update Posted : September 18, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Brief Summary:

Although the cause of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is unknown, physicians sometimes try to treat it with antibiotics or alpha-receptor blockers.

In this multicenter, double-blind factorial trial, 196 men with moderately severe CP/CPPS were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of treatment with ciprofloxacin, tamsulosin, both drugs, or placebo. Neither ciprofloxacin nor tamsulosin substantively reduced symptoms.

Ciprofloxacin and tamsulosin were not effective treatments for CP/CPPS. Patients had long-standing, refractory CP/CPPS and received trial treatments for only 6 weeks. Patients with new diagnoses who are given longer courses of the trial treatments might respond differently.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Chronic Prostatitis With Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Drug: Ciprofloxacin Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Placebo Drug: Ciprofloxacin placebo Phase 2

Detailed Description:
Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common disorder and accounts for approximately 2 million visits to physicians annually in the United States. The substantial impact of CP/CPPS includes bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, sexual dysfunction, reduced quality of life, and increased health care expenditures. The syndrome is diagnosed only on the basis of symptoms, principally pain or discomfort in the pelvic region. No objective measures can help define the disease. Although bacteria can infect the prostate, most men with prostatitis have a negative midstream urine culture, indicating that bacteria may not be the cause of their symptoms. Such men are classified as having National Institutes of Health (NIH) category III prostatitis, the most common of the clinically defined prostatitis syndromes. It is by no means clear that the disease is characterized by inflammation of the prostate or that the prostate is responsible for symptoms in a substantial proportion of patients. Because of this uncertainty, the term CP/CPPS is used. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is commonly seen by primary care practitioners, internists, and urologists. In the Olmsted County Study of Urinary Symptoms and Health Status Among Men, a population-based study in Olmstead County, Minnesota, the overall prevalence rate of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis was 9%. Population-based surveys of symptoms have estimated that the prevalence of the syndrome ranges from 9% to 12% among men. It is difficult to estimate the proportion of patients with symptoms lasting longer than 3 months whose disorder remains refractory to empirical therapy. These patients are commonly seen by urologists, but whether they represent a minor subpopulation of the overall symptomatic group or make up the majority of patients is unknown. The investigators chose to study these patients because they present with a troubling, long-standing problem and are usually treated with agents of unclear benefit. Even if a relatively large number of men whose symptoms last 3 months or more are cured by standard empirical therapy and the clinical scenario the investigators describe is uncommon, men with refractory symptoms still present a substantial problem to internists and urologists who have little information to guide therapy. Because the cause of CP/CPPS is unknown, affected men receive many empirical therapies. The 2 most common treatments prescribed by physicians are antimicrobial agents and alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists, although there is little objective evidence to support their use. Quinolones, such as ciprofloxacin, are commonly used to treat CP/CPPS because of their excellent penetration into the prostate and broad spectrum of coverage for uropathogens and other organisms traditionally believed to be associated with the syndrome. Tamsulosin, an alpha-blocker, is an effective treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and it has been hypothesized that tamsulosin may improve these symptoms in men with CP/CPPS. This randomized clinical trial was designed to evaluate whether ciprofloxacin or tamsulosin reduces symptoms of long-standing CP/CPPS of at least moderate severity, typical of the 488 men in our Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study. The primary purpose of the trial was to test the most common prescription treatments given to men with CP/CPPS, who are commonly seen in our referral-based urologic practices.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 196 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Ciprofloxacin or Tamsulosin in Men With Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: a Randomized, Double-blind Trial
Actual Study Start Date : September 30, 1997
Actual Primary Completion Date : August 31, 2003
Actual Study Completion Date : August 31, 2003

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Pelvic Pain

Arm Intervention/treatment
Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Men assigned to placebo
Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Placebo
Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Placebo (Placebo-TH) one tablet once daily
Other Name: Placebo-TH

Drug: Ciprofloxacin placebo
Ciprofloxacin placebo (Placebo-CF) one tablet twice daily
Other Name: Placebo-CF

Experimental: Ciprofloxacin alone
Men assigned to Ciprofloxacin alone
Drug: Ciprofloxacin
Ciprofloxacin, 500 mg twice daily
Other Name: CF

Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Placebo
Tamsulosin Hydrochloride Placebo (Placebo-TH) one tablet once daily
Other Name: Placebo-TH

Experimental: Tamsulosin alone
Men assigned to Tamsulosin alone
Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride
Tamsulosin Hydrochloride, 0.4 mg once daily
Other Name: TH

Drug: Ciprofloxacin placebo
Ciprofloxacin placebo (Placebo-CF) one tablet twice daily
Other Name: Placebo-CF

Experimental: Combination of ciprofloxacin and tamsulosin
Men assigned to a combination of ciprofloxacin and tamsulosin
Drug: Ciprofloxacin
Ciprofloxacin, 500 mg twice daily
Other Name: CF

Drug: Tamsulosin Hydrochloride
Tamsulosin Hydrochloride, 0.4 mg once daily
Other Name: TH




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in the NIH-CPSI total score [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Change in the overall NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) total score (range of 0-43 points) from baseline to 6 weeks; a higher score indicates a worse outcome


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in the 7-point patient-reported global response assessment (GRA) [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    GRA assesses the change in overall symptoms from baseline to 6 weeks using a 7-point scale which ranges from:(0) markedly worse to (6) markedly improved.

  2. Change in the physical summary scores on the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS SF-12) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Physical and Mental Health Composite Scores (PCS & MCS) are computed using the scores of twelve questions and range from 0 to 100, where a zero score indicates the lowest level of health measured by the scales and 100 indicates the highest level of health. Physical health-related domains include General Health (GH), Physical Functioning (PF), Role Physical (RP), and Body Pain (BP).

  3. Change in the mental summary scores on the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS SF-12) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Physical and Mental Health Composite Scores (PCS & MCS) are computed using the scores of twelve questions and range from 0 to 100, where a zero score indicates the lowest level of health measured by the scales and 100 indicates the highest level of health. Mental health-related scales include Vitality (VT), Social Functioning (SF), Role Emotional (RE), and Mental Health (MH).

  4. Change in the pain scores of the NIH-CPSI [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Change in the pain scores of the NIH-CPSI (range of 0-21 points) from baseline to 6 weeks; a higher score indicates a worse outcome

  5. Change in the voiding scores of the NIH-CPSI [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Change in the voiding scores of the NIH-CPSI (range of 0-10 points) from baseline to 6 weeks; a higher score indicates a worse outcome

  6. Change in the quality of life scores of the NIH-CPSI [ Time Frame: Baseline and 6 weeks ]
    Change in the quality of life scores of the NIH-CPSI (range of 0-12 points) from baseline to 6 weeks; a higher score indicates a worse outcome



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • The study population will consist of men with symptoms of discomfort or pain in the pelvic region for at least a 3-month period within the previous 6 months. Candidates must have at least a "moderate" overall score on the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), defined as 15 or more points of a potential of 0 to 43 points.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Medical History and Comorbid Conditions: Prostate, bladder, or urethral cancer, seizure disorder. Concurrent history of Inflammatory bowel disease; active urethral stricture; neurologic disease or disorder affecting the bladder; liver disease; neurologic impairment or psychiatric disorder preventing understanding of consent and ability to comply with protocol. Diagnosed with or treated for symptomatic genital herpes in the prior 12 months.
  • Urinary tract infection, with a urine culture value of greater than 100,000 colony forming units (CFU)/mL; clinical evidence of urethritis, including urethral discharge or positive culture, diagnostic of sexually transmitted diseases (including gonorrhea, chlamydia, mycoplasma or trichomonas, but not including HIV/AIDS); symptoms of acute or chronic epididymitis in the prior 3 months.
  • Prior Treatment: Pelvic radiation, systemic chemotherapy; intravesical chemotherapy; intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP), transurethral Incision or Resection of the Bladder Neck (TUIBN), transurethral microwave therapy (TUMT), transurethral needle ablation (TUNA), balloon dilation of the prostate, open prostatectomy or any other prostate surgery or treatment such as cryotherapy or thermal therapy; prior treatment for orchialgia without pelvic symptoms; known allergy or sensitivity to ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, tamsulosin hydrochloride, or any of their known components. Prostate biopsy in the prior 3 months.
  • Prior or Concurrent Medications: Concurrent use of Theophylline; on-going use of magnesium, aluminum, or calcium-containing antacids. Initiated or stopped finasteride or other androgen hormone inhibitors in the prior 6 months. Tamsulosin hydrochloride, doxazosin mesylate, terazosin HCl, or alpha-blockers; ciprofloxacin hydrochloride; antimicrobial agents (oral or parenteral); started, stopped, or changed dose level of any prostatitis-specific medications in the prior 4 weeks.
  • Bioflavonoid agents; zinc or iron supplements; cimetidine in the prior 2 weeks

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04552431


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Richard J Landis UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, PHILADELPHIA
Study Data/Documents: Individual Participant Data Set  This link exits the ClinicalTrials.gov site
Identifier: CPCRN RCT #1

Publications:
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Responsible Party: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04552431    
Other Study ID Numbers: CPCRN RCT1
U01DK065209 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: September 17, 2020    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 18, 2020
Last Verified: September 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: Data are available at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Central Repository: https://repository.niddk.nih.gov/home/
URL: https://repository.niddk.nih.gov/home/

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Product Manufactured in and Exported from the U.S.: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Prostatitis
Syndrome
Pelvic Pain
Chronic Disease
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Prostatic Diseases
Disease Attributes
Ciprofloxacin
Tamsulosin
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Topoisomerase II Inhibitors
Topoisomerase Inhibitors
Enzyme Inhibitors
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Antineoplastic Agents
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 Inhibitors
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme Inhibitors
Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists
Adrenergic Antagonists
Adrenergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Urological Agents