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Promoting Resilience in Teens With ASD (PRITA)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04208425
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : December 23, 2019
Last Update Posted : March 18, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology
Autism Research Institute
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Matthew Daniel Lerner, Stony Brook University

Brief Summary:
Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are almost uniformly costly and time-intensive, blunting dissemination of intervention and stymying opportunities to make scalable impact. This study offers the first pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of whether a single session intervention, shown to reduce internalizing problems in typically-developing youth, may improve core and co-occuring symptoms of ASD.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Autism Spectrum Disorder Behavioral: Project Personality Behavioral: Sharing Feelings Intervention Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Interventions for core and co-occurring symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are almost uniformly costly and time-intensive, blunting dissemination of intervention and stymying opportunities to make scalable, population-level impact. One promising solution to this problem is a new class of evidence-based treatments, single-session interventions (SSIs), which have shown remarkable efficacy in treating a range of other developmental psychopathologies. No study to date has examined SSIs in youth with ASD, which, if even marginally effective, could dramatically reduce the cost and expand the public health impact of accessible intervention options for ASD. This study offers the first pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of whether an SSI shown to reduce internalizing problems in typically-developing youth may improve core and co-occurring symptoms of ASD.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 40 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This study will be a two-arm randomized controlled trial, including one active intervention conditions and one active control condition. Adolescents (and one caregiver per adolescent participant) will visit the Social Competence and Treatment Lab in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University. This lab visit will last approximately 2.5 hours. Adolescents and parents will complete baseline questionnaires (see sections below for details). Participants will then be randomized to one of two intervention conditions, using Qualtrics built in functionality: the single session growth mindset intervention (SSI GMI), or an active control program, designed to replicate supportive therapy (ST) and tested in previous work. Immediately after intervention completion, adolescents will complete a brief post-intervention questionnaire battery. Adolescents and parents will then be asked to complete online follow-up questionnaire batteries 3-months post-intervention.
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Masking Description: Participants in the study will be masked by using Qualtrics built in randomization function.
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Promoting Resilience in Teens With ASD
Actual Study Start Date : January 7, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : March 2022

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Project Personality
The web-based growth mindset intervention, called Project Personality, is delivered entirely via Qualtrics and takes approximately 30 minutes to complete. All intervention activities are self-administered by youth and delivered in a web-based format, including illustrations and audio-recordings of text. Intervention content is designed to maximize relevance for youths experiencing symptoms of depression, including excessive sadness and hopelessness.
Behavioral: Project Personality
The intervention includes five components: 1. An introduction to the brain, including a lesson on the concept of neuroplasticity, describing how and why our behaviors are controlled by thoughts and feelings in their brains, which have potential for change; 2. Written testimonials from older youths who describe their beliefs that people's personal traits (e.g., sadness, anxiety) are malleable, given the brain's plasticity; 3. Additional vignettes written by older youths, describing times when they used "growth mindsets" to persevere through social and emotional setbacks; 4. A summary of selected scientific studies suggesting that personality can, and often does, change in positive ways over time; and 5. An exercise in which the participants write notes to younger students, drawing on scientific information to describe the malleability of people's personal traits (i.e., a "self-persuasion" exercise).

Active Comparator: Sharing Feelings Intervention
The Sharing Feelings Intervention is delivered entirely via Qualtrics, is self-administered by youth, and takes approximately 30 minutes to complete. It is structurally similar to the growth mindset intervention, but it is designed to mimic supportive therapy (ST). The goals of the ST intervention is to encourage youths to identify and express feelings to close others; the intervention does not teach or emphasize specific skills or beliefs. In previous clinical trials, ST has resulted in significantly fewer reductions in youth internalizing problems compared to cognitive-behavioral and growth mindset interventions.
Behavioral: Sharing Feelings Intervention
The ST SSI is designed to control for nonspecific aspects of intervention, including engagement in a computer program. It includes the same number of reading and writing activities as the web-based growth mindset intervention; it also mirrors the web-based growth mindset intervention as closely as possible, including vignettes written by older youths who describe times when they benefited from sharing their feelings with friends or family.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    Adolescent depressive symptom severity will be assessed using the Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) Child and Parent forms. The CDI-2 is a reliable, valid measure of youth depression severity, normed for youth age and sex and yielding raw and T scores. Changes in youth CDI2 scores from baseline to each of the follow-up assessments will serve as the primary index of intervention effects. The CDI-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item on the child form is scored 0-2, yielding a total score between 0 and 56 with a higher total score indicating increased depressive symptomatology and a lower total score indicating decreased depressive symptomatology. Each item on the parent form is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 51 with a higher score indicating increased depressive symptomatology and a lower total score indicating decreased depressive symptomatology.

  2. Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) [ Time Frame: 3-moth followup ]
    Adolescent depressive symptom severity will be assessed using the Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) Child and Parent forms. The CDI-2 is a reliable, valid measure of youth depression severity, normed for youth age and sex and yielding raw and T scores. Changes in youth CDI2 scores from baseline to each of the follow-up assessments will serve as the primary index of intervention effects. The CDI-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item on the child form is scored 0-2, yielding a total score between 0 and 56 with a higher total score indicating increased depressive symptomatology and a lower total score indicating decreased depressive symptomatology. Each item on the parent form is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 51 with a higher score indicating increased depressive symptomatology and a lower total score indicating decreased depressive symptomatology.

  3. Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Second Edition (BRIEF-2) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Second Edition (BRIEF-2) is a valid, reliable tool for assessing executive functioning skills in home and school environments. Changes in BRIEF-2 scores from baseline to the 3-month follow-up assessment will serve as the primary index of intervention effects. The BRIEF-2 will take approximately 10 minutes. Each item on the child form is scored 1-3 (1 = Never; 2 = Sometimes; 3 = Often), yielding a total score between 55 and 165 with a higher total score indicating more severe deficiency. Each item on the parent form is scored 1-3 (1 = Never; 2 = Sometimes; 3 = Often), yielding a total scored between 55 and 165 with a higher total score indicating more severe deficiency.

  4. Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Second Edition (BRIEF-2) [ Time Frame: 3-moth followup ]
    The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Second Edition (BRIEF-2) is a valid, reliable tool for assessing executive functioning skills in home and school environments. Changes in BRIEF-2 scores from baseline to the 3-month follow-up assessment will serve as the primary index of intervention effects. The BRIEF-2 will take approximately 10 minutes. Each item on the child form is scored 1-3 (1 = Never; 2 = Sometimes; 3 = Often), yielding a total score between 55 and 165 with a higher total score indicating more severe deficiency. Each item on the parent form is scored 1-3 (1 = Never; 2 = Sometimes; 3 = Often), yielding a total scored between 55 and 165 with a higher total score indicating more severe deficiency.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) is a valid, reliable screening tool for adult (here, parental) psychological distress. Adult respondents rate endorsement of 18 physical and emotional complaints on a 0-4 Likert scale (0 = Not at all; 4 = Extremely), yielding a total between 0 and 72 with a higher score indicating increased parental stress. The BSI-18 includes 3 subscales for somatic, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, respectively. The total sum score yields an additional total distress score. The BSI-18 will take approximately 4 minutes to complete.

  2. Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) is a valid, reliable screening tool for adult (here, parental) psychological distress. Adult respondents rate endorsement of 18 physical and emotional complaints on a 0-4 Likert scale (0 = Not at all; 4 = Extremely), yielding a total between 0 and 72 with a higher score indicating increased parental stress. The BSI-18 includes 3 subscales for somatic, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, respectively. The total sum score yields an additional total distress score. The BSI-18 will take approximately 4 minutes to complete.

  3. Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children-2 (MASC-2) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children-2 (MASC-2) is widely-used in ASD studies. The parent- and self-report versions appear to measure the same construct in youths receiving the intervention and active control. It will be included in obtained models to see whether it alters patterns of effects. The MASC-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3 (0 = Never; 3 = Often), yielding a total score between 0 and 150 with a higher total score indicating increased symptom severity.

  4. Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children-2 (MASC-2) [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children-2 (MASC-2) is widely-used in ASD studies. The parent- and self-report versions appear to measure the same construct in youths receiving the intervention and active control. It will be included in obtained models to see whether it alters patterns of effects. The MASC-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3 (0 = Never; 3 = Often), yielding a total score between 0 and 150 with a higher total score indicating increased symptom severity.

  5. Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) is a 24-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to influence or alter objective events or conditions through personal effort. Youth rate agreement with statements about their ability to exert primary control (e.g., "I can do well on tests if I study hard"; "I can get other kids to like me if I try"). This PCSC has shown acceptable internal consistency, 6-month test-retest reliability, and strong inverse relations to adolescent depressive symptoms. The PCSC will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 72, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  6. Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Post-intervention ]
    The Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) is a 24-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to influence or alter objective events or conditions through personal effort. Youth rate agreement with statements about their ability to exert primary control (e.g., "I can do well on tests if I study hard"; "I can get other kids to like me if I try"). This PCSC has shown acceptable internal consistency, 6-month test-retest reliability, and strong inverse relations to adolescent depressive symptoms. The PCSC will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 72, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  7. Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The Primary Control Scale for Children (PCSC) is a 24-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to influence or alter objective events or conditions through personal effort. Youth rate agreement with statements about their ability to exert primary control (e.g., "I can do well on tests if I study hard"; "I can get other kids to like me if I try"). This PCSC has shown acceptable internal consistency, 6-month test-retest reliability, and strong inverse relations to adolescent depressive symptoms. The PCSC will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 72, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  8. Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) is a 20-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to shape the personal impact of objective conditions on oneself, by adjusting oneself to fit those conditions. Youth rate agreement with items reflecting various kinds of secondary control, such as adjusting cognition ("When something bad happens, I can find a way to think about it that makes me feel better"). The SCSC has shown acceptable reliability and validity in a large youth sample. The SCSC will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 60, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  9. Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Post-intervention ]
    The Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) is a 20-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to shape the personal impact of objective conditions on oneself, by adjusting oneself to fit those conditions. Youth rate agreement with items reflecting various kinds of secondary control, such as adjusting cognition ("When something bad happens, I can find a way to think about it that makes me feel better"). The SCSC has shown acceptable reliability and validity in a large youth sample. The SCSC will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 60, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  10. Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The Secondary Control Scale for Children (SCSC) is a 20-item scale measuring youths' perceived ability to shape the personal impact of objective conditions on oneself, by adjusting oneself to fit those conditions. Youth rate agreement with items reflecting various kinds of secondary control, such as adjusting cognition ("When something bad happens, I can find a way to think about it that makes me feel better"). The SCSC has shown acceptable reliability and validity in a large youth sample. The SCSC will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 0-3, yielding a total score between 0 and 60, with an decreased total score indicating decreased ability to exert primary control.

  11. Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2) is a 65-item scale measuring the parent's perceived presence, and severity, of current social deficits. Changes in the SRS-2 from baseline to the follow-up assessment will serve as the secondary index of intervention effects. The SRS-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 1-4, yielding a total score between 65 and 260 with a higher total score indicating increased deficiencies.

  12. Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2) [ Time Frame: 3-moth followup ]
    The Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2) is a 65-item scale measuring the parent's perceived presence, and severity, of current social deficits. Changes in the SRS-2 from baseline to the follow-up assessment will serve as the secondary index of intervention effects. The SRS-2 will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 1-4, yielding a total score between 65 and 260 with a higher total score indicating increased deficiencies.

  13. The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report is a short questionnaire that measures the self-esteem of youth. This measure will be administered in lab to parents and children. All SPPC/A will be administered by research assistants. The SPPC/A will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 1-4, yielding a total score between 10 and 40 with a higher total score indicating increased social competence.

  14. The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Post-intervention ]
    The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report is a short questionnaire that measures the self-esteem of youth. This measure will be administered in lab to parents and children. All SPPC/A will be administered by research assistants. The SPPC/A will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 1-4, yielding a total score between 10 and 40 with a higher total score indicating increased social competence.

  15. The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The Self Perception Profile for Children/ Adolescents (SPPC/A) self-report is a short questionnaire that measures the self-esteem of youth. This measure will be administered in lab to parents and children. All SPPC/A will be administered by research assistants. The SPPC/A will take approximately 5 minutes to complete. Each item is scored 1-4, yielding a total score between 10 and 40 with a higher total score indicating increased social competence.

  16. Implicit Personality Theory Questionnaire (ITPQ) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Pre-intervention ]
    The IPTQ asks youth to rate the extent of their agreement with three statements linked to the malleability of personality, using a 1-to-7 Likert scale (e.g. "Your personality is something about you that you can't change very much"). Higher summed scores on these three items indicate a stronger fixed personality mindset, a lower scores, a stronger growth personality mindset. The ITPQ will take approximately 4 minutes to complete.

  17. Implicit Personality Theory Questionnaire (ITPQ) [ Time Frame: up to 1 hour Post-intervention ]
    The IPTQ asks youth to rate the extent of their agreement with three statements linked to the malleability of personality, using a 1-to-7 Likert scale (e.g. "Your personality is something about you that you can't change very much"). Higher summed scores on these three items indicate a stronger fixed personality mindset, a lower scores, a stronger growth personality mindset. The ITPQ will take approximately 4 minutes to complete.

  18. Implicit Personality Theory Questionnaire (ITPQ) [ Time Frame: 3-month followup ]
    The IPTQ asks youth to rate the extent of their agreement with three statements linked to the malleability of personality, using a 1-to-7 Likert scale (e.g. "Your personality is something about you that you can't change very much"). Higher summed scores on these three items indicate a stronger fixed personality mindset, a lower scores, a stronger growth personality mindset. The ITPQ will take approximately 4 minutes to complete.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   11 Years to 16 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Youth between the ages of 11-16 (inclusive) at the time of study participation;
  • Youth with one parent or legal guardian willing to participate in the study (i.e. to be present for the lab visit and to complete questionnaires throughout the study period);
  • Youth speaks English well enough to complete online or virtual based intervention activities;
  • Youth with IQ ≥ 70;
  • Parent or legal guardian speaks English well enough to complete online questionnaires;
  • Youth with SCQ >10;
  • Youth who meet criteria for autism or ASD on the ADOS-2.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Failure to meet the above inclusion criteria;
  • Intellectual disability (IQ<70), as this may undermine comprehension of intervention materials;
  • Adolescent is non-English speaking;
  • The presence of a known developmental disability aside from ASD that would interfere with study participation;
  • The presence of a significant medical disability or disorder that would interfere with study participation.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04208425


Contacts
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Contact: Matthew D Lerner, PhD 631-632-7660 Matthew.Lerner@stonybrook.edu
Contact: Joseph P Giacomantonio, B.S 631-632-7857 joseph.giacomantonio@stonybrook.edu

Locations
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United States, New York
Stony Brook University Recruiting
Stony Brook, New York, United States, 11794
Contact: Joseph P Giacomantonio, B.S    631-632-7857    joseph.giacomantonio@stonybrook.edu   
Contact: Matthew D Lerner, Ph.D    631-632-7660    matthew.lerner@stonybrook.edu   
Principal Investigator: Matthew D Lerner, Ph.D         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stony Brook University
Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology
Autism Research Institute
Investigators
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Study Director: Joseph P Giacomantonio, B.S Stony Brook University
Publications:
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Responsible Party: Matthew Daniel Lerner, Associate Professor, Stony Brook University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04208425    
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB2019-00280
AWD00001042 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology )
AWD00001244 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: Autism Research Institute )
First Posted: December 23, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 18, 2020
Last Verified: March 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Matthew Daniel Lerner, Stony Brook University:
Anxiety
Depression
Autism
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Single Session Intervention
ASD
SSI
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders