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Changing School Start Times: Impact on Student, Family, Teacher, and Community Health

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03964181
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : May 28, 2019
Last Update Posted : May 28, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Lisa Meltzer, National Jewish Health

Brief Summary:
Sleep is not an optional luxury, but a fundamental biological need, essential for health and well-being. Insufficient sleep is a significant public health issue, with 69% of adolescents in America obtaining less than the minimum requirement of 8 hours of sleep per night. Early school start times has been identified as the most significant and modifiable factor that restricts sleep duration in adolescents. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended in 2014 that all middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m., yet few school districts have implemented this change. In fall 2017, the Cherry Creek School District, a diverse district of almost 55,000 students outside Denver, changed school start times. Although previous studies have shown increased sleep duration, decreased daytime sleepiness, and improved academics following start time changes for secondary students, there remains an urgent need to understand how this policy impacts health and well-being for all students, including youth in elementary school. Recognizing that students are part of a complex system that includes parents, school staff, and the community, this observational study will be a multi-year, broad-based evaluation that includes key stakeholders, multiple sources of quantitative data (i.e., surveys, academic records, district nursing electronic health records), contextual qualitative data (i.e., open-ended surveys and focus groups), and community-based outcomes (i.e., data on vehicle crashes and juvenile crimes). The primary hypothesis is that later school start times will have a positive impact on middle and high school students sleep and health outcomes, while earlier school start times will have a neutral impact on elementary school students sleep and health outcomes.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Sleep Other: Change in school start times

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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 52000 participants
Observational Model: Ecologic or Community
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Changing School Start Times: Impact on Student, Family, Teacher, and Community Health
Actual Study Start Date : April 11, 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : November 2020

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Students Grades 3-12 Other: Change in school start times
Elementary start times changed from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.; middle school start times changed from 8:00 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.; high school start times changed from 7:10 a.m. to 8:20 a.m.

Parents of Students Grades K-12 Other: Change in school start times
Elementary start times changed from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.; middle school start times changed from 8:00 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.; high school start times changed from 7:10 a.m. to 8:20 a.m.

School Based Teachers and Staff Grades K-12 Other: Change in school start times
Elementary start times changed from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.; middle school start times changed from 8:00 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.; high school start times changed from 7:10 a.m. to 8:20 a.m.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in sleep duration from before start time change to 1 and 2 years after start time change [ Time Frame: Typical bedtime and wake time, assessed prior to start time change, and 1 and 2 years after start time change ]
    Reported sleep from bedtime to wake time



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Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Participants were drawn from the Cherry Creek School District outside of Denver, Colorado
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Students in grades 3-12 enrolled in the school district
  • Parents of students in grades K-12 enrolled in the school district
  • School-based teachers and staff in grades K-12 in the school district

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03964181


Locations
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United States, Colorado
National Jewish Health
Denver, Colorado, United States, 80206
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Jewish Health
Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: Lisa Meltzer, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03964181    
Other Study ID Numbers: HS-3155
75277 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evidence for Action )
First Posted: May 28, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 28, 2019
Last Verified: May 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No