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Recovery of Performance, Muscle Damage and Neuromuscular Fatigue Following Muscle Power Training (PoTrRec)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03936595
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 3, 2019
Last Update Posted : December 27, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ioannis G. Fatouros, University of Thessaly

Brief Summary:

Muscle power is one of the most important parameters in almost every athletic action, and expresses the ability of the human muscle to produce great amounts of force with the greatest possible speed. Thus, muscle power is critical for high performance in athletic actions such as jumping, throwing, change of direction and sprinting. For enhancing their muscle power, athletes comprise several resistance training programs as part of their training. Muscle power training comprises of eccentric muscle actions, and the magnitude of these actions depend on the emphasis that is given on the concentric or eccentric action, respectively, of the muscles during the exercises. However, eccentric muscle action, especially when unaccustomed, can lead to exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), and deterioration of muscle performance.

Despite the fact that muscle power training comprises eccentric muscle actions, and consequently can lead to muscle injury and muscle performance reduction during the following days, the recovery kinetics after acute muscle power training have not been adequately studied. However, information regarding the recovery of the muscles after a power training protocol, is critical for the correct design of a training microcycle, and the reduction of injury risk.

The aim of the present study is to investigate the muscle injury provoked after acute muscle power training using three different power training exercise protocols. Additionally, we will examine the effect of these protocols on muscle performance and neuromuscular fatigue indices.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Power Training Exercise Protocols Other: Core exercises protocol Other: Structural exercises protocol Other: Accentuated eccentric load exercises protocol Other: Control condition Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Muscle power is one of the most important parameters in almost every athletic action, and expresses the ability of the human muscle to produce great amounts of force with the greatest possible speed. Thus, muscle power is critical for high performance in athletic actions such as jumping, throwing, change of direction and sprinting.

For enhancing their muscle power, athletes comprise several resistance training programs as part of their training. Core exercises as long as Olympic lifting has been used in muscle power training. The loads that are applied regarding the accomplishment of the most favorable power production are varying. Training load of 0% 1RM favored power production at the countermovement squat jump, while loads of 56% 1rm and 80% 1RM, favored the power production at squat and hang clean, respectively. Additionally, In the recent years, accentuated eccentric training has been proposed as a new training method for the enhancement of muscle power. This method emphasizes the eccentric component of the muscle contraction, and there is evidence supporting the greater production of muscle force after accentuated eccentric training compared with the typical resistance exercise training method.

Taking the above into consideration, muscle power training comprises of eccentric muscle actions, and the magnitude of the eccentric component depends on the emphasis that is given on the concentric or eccentric action, respectively, of the muscles during the exercises. However, eccentric muscle action, especially when unaccustomed, can lead to exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Although concentric and isometric exercise may also lead to muscle injury, the amount of damage after eccentric muscle contractions is greater. EIMD, amongst others, is accompanied by increased levels of creatine kinase (CK) into the circulation, increased delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), reduction of force production, reduction of flexibility speed.

Despite the fact that muscle power training comprises eccentric muscle actions, and consequently can lead to muscle injury and muscle performance reduction during the following days, the recovery kinetics after acute muscle power training protocols have not been adequately studied. However, information regarding the recovery of the muscles after a power training protocol, is critical for the correct design of a training microcycle, and the reduction of injury risk.

The aim of the present study is to investigate the muscle injury provoked after muscle acute power training using three different power training exercise protocols. Additionally, the effect of these protocols on muscle performance and neuromuscular fatigue indices will be examined.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 10 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Each participant will perform in a random order all four different experimental conditions
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Investigation on the Recovery Kinetics of Performance, Muscle Damage and Neuromuscular Fatigue Indicators, Following Different Protocols for Muscle Power Development
Actual Study Start Date : May 6, 2019
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 16, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : June 28, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Core exercises protocol
Participants will perform 4 core exercises
Other: Core exercises protocol

Participants will perform:

  1. Squats, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  2. Deadlifts, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  3. Lunges, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  4. Step ups, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM

Experimental: Structural exercises protocol
Participants will perform 4 structural (Olympic lifting) exercises
Other: Structural exercises protocol

Participants will perform:

  1. Snatch, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  2. Hang clean, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  3. Push jerk, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM
  4. Split push jerk, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 60% 1RM

Experimental: Accentuated eccentric load exercises protocol
Participants will perform 4 exercises with eccentric loading
Other: Accentuated eccentric load exercises protocol

Participants will perform:

  1. Deadlifts - squat jump, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 30% body mass (BM)
  2. Step down - squat jump, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 30% BM
  3. Step down - lunges, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 30% BM
  4. Hip thrusts, 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 30% BM

Control condition
Participants will perform all the measurements that are comprised in the experimental conditions without performing any exercise protocol
Other: Control condition
Participants will perform all the measurements that are comprised in the experimental conditions without performing any exercise protocol




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change on delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), in the knee flexors (KF) and extensors (KE) of both limbs [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Participants will perform three repetitions of a full squat movement, and rate their soreness level in knee flexors and extensors on a visual analog scale from 1 to 10 (VAS, with "no pain" at one end and "extremely sore" at the other), using palpation of the belly and the distal region of relaxed knee extensors and flexors.

  2. Change on countermovement jump (CMJ) height [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    CMJ height will be measured in 3 maximal efforts (the best jump will be recorded) on an Ergojump contact platform

  3. Change on isometric peak torque of the knee extensors (KE) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Isometric peak torque of the KE will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  4. Change on isometric peak torque of the knee flexors (KF) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Isometric peak torque of the KF will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  5. Change on concentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensors (KE) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Concentric peak torque of the KE will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  6. Change on concentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee flexors (KF) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Concentric peak torque of the KF will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  7. Change one eccentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensors (KE) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Eccentric peak torque of the KE will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  8. Change on eccentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee flexors (KF) [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Eccentric peak torque of the KF will be measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60◦/sec

  9. Change on the concentration of plasma CK activity [ Time Frame: Prior to, immediately after, 1, 2, 3 days after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Plasma CK activity will be measured with a biochemical analyzer

  10. Change on the concentration of blood lactate [ Time Frame: Prior to, and immediately after the end of the experimental protocol ]
    Lactate will be measured with a portable lactate analyzer using capillary blood



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • No recent history of musculoskeletal injury
  • No use of ergogenic supplements and drugs
  • No use of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant supplements (> 6 months)
  • No participation at intense eccentric exercise for at least 3 days before protocols

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Recent history of musculoskeletal injury
  • Use of ergogenic supplements and drugs
  • Use of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant supplements (< 6 months)
  • Participation at intense eccentric exercise for at least 3 days before protocols

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03936595


Locations
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Greece
Laboratory of Exercise Biochemistry, Exercise Physiology,and Sports Nutrition, School of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessaly
Trikala, Thessaly, Greece, 42100
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Thessaly
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Ioannis G Fatouros, PhD University of Thessaly
Publications:
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Responsible Party: Ioannis G. Fatouros, Professor, University of Thessaly
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03936595    
Other Study ID Numbers: Power Training-Recovery UTH
First Posted: May 3, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 27, 2019
Last Verified: December 2019

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Fatigue
Signs and Symptoms