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A Comparison of Parenting Education Approaches for Adolescent Fathers

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03921892
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : April 19, 2019
Last Update Posted : August 12, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rita Sue Lasiter, University of Missouri, Kansas City

Brief Summary:
This feasibility and acceptability study will compare in-person to web-based parenting education for adolescent fathers on the outcomes of parenting confidence and participation in parenting activities.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Adolescent, Parenting Behavioral: Parenting Education Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
This is a randomized feasibility and acceptability study using a block generator for randomization of participants aged 15 to 21 into either in-person parenting education or on-line parenting. Outcome measures include parenting self-efficacy and participation in daily parenting activities. Participants will take part in approximately twelve hours of parenting education, whether in-person or on-line. Recruitment flyers will be placed in two primary care clinics and a large regional hospital's Labor & Delivery and Postpartum (Mother-Baby) Units. Participants will seek out the opportunity to participate by calling the phone number or sending an e-mail to the investigators to learn more about the study and their potential participation. If participants meet eligibility criteria and elect to participate, baseline measurements will be completed after enrollment, with follow-up measures at one month and two months.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 24 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Using a block randomization generator, participants will be randomized into either in-person or on-line parenting education that will take place over a two week period of time.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: A Randomized Feasibility and Acceptability Study Comparing In-person to On-line Parenting Education for Adolescent Fathers
Estimated Study Start Date : September 15, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 15, 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : May 31, 2020

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Parenting

Arm Intervention/treatment
In-person parenting education
Participants will complete two six-hour in-person parenting education sessions on two consecutive Saturdays
Behavioral: Parenting Education
Parenting education such as positive parenting interactions with their child, knowledge of developmental milestones and interactions with the child to support that development, as well as co-parenting skills will be provided either in-person or on-line to adolescent fathers

Active Comparator: On-line parenting education
Participants will complete on-line parenting education at the times and locations of their choice over a two-week period.
Behavioral: Parenting Education
Parenting education such as positive parenting interactions with their child, knowledge of developmental milestones and interactions with the child to support that development, as well as co-parenting skills will be provided either in-person or on-line to adolescent fathers




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Feasibility Measure 1 [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Did recruitment numbers meet goals

  2. Feasibility Measure 2 [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Attrition rate of participants

  3. Feasibility Measure 3 [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Percent of data missing from data collection tools

  4. Acceptability Survey Measure 1 (Likert Scale) [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Acceptability of learning content to participants

  5. Acceptability Survey Measure 2 (Likert Scale) [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Acceptability of time burden to participants

  6. Acceptability Survey Measure 3 (Likert Scale) [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Acceptability of learning method to participants


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. What is the difference between in-person education as compared to on-line parenting education on parental self-efficacy of adolescent fathers as measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC)? [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Does providing parenting education to adolescent fathers, either in-person or on-line, change their levels of parenting self-efficacy

  2. What is the difference between in-person parenting education as compared to on-line parenting education on participation in parenting activities of adolescent fathers as measured by the Child Care Activities Scale (CCAS)? [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Does either in-person or on-line parenting education impact the participation in parenting activities of adolescent fathers?



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years to 21 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Gender Based Eligibility:   Yes
Gender Eligibility Description:   Adolescent males aged 15 to 21
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age 15 to 21,
  • be able to read and understand English (as determined by having the individual read a brief, eighth grade reading level paragraph),
  • able to begin the intervention within six weeks of their infant's birth,
  • be able to participate in an intervention over two weeks, requiring approximately a 12-hour time commitment: either in-person on two Saturdays for six hours each, or a self-paced content of videos and resource materials over two weeks,
  • own or have access to a device with internet access and
  • have a working e-mail address.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any condition that might prevent the father's infant from reaching normal developmental milestones will participation, including congenital malformations or prematurity requiring prolonged/ ongoing infant hospitalization.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03921892


Contacts
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Contact: Debra Sims, PhD(c) 9072442234 ext 9072442234 dcsyt7@mail.umkc.edu
Contact: Sue Lasiter, PhD 8162356766 ext 8162356766 lasiterr@umkc.edu

Locations
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United States, Alaska
Anchorage Neighborhood Health Center Not yet recruiting
Anchorage, Alaska, United States, 99503
Contact: Debra Sims, PhD(c)    907-244-2234 ext 9072442234    dcsyt7@mail.umkc.edu   
Providence Alaska Medical Center Not yet recruiting
Anchorage, Alaska, United States, 99508
Contact: Debra Sims, PhD(c)    907-244-2234 ext 9072442234    dcsyt7@mail.umkc.edu   
Providence Family Medicine Clinic Not yet recruiting
Anchorage, Alaska, United States, 99508
Contact: Debra Sims, PhD(c)    907-244-2234    dcsyt7@mail.umkc.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Missouri, Kansas City

Publications of Results:
Johnston, C., & Mash, E. J., (1989). A measure of parenting satisfaction and efficacy. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 18(2), 167-175

Other Publications:
Kiselica, M. S., & Kiselica, A. M. (2014). The complicated worlds of adolescent fathers: Implications for clinical practice, public policy, and research. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 15(3), 260-274. doi:10.1037/a0037043
Seymour, M., Dunning, M., Cooklin, A., & Giallo, R. (2014). Socioecological factors associated with fathers' well-being difficulties in the early parenting period. Clinical Psychologist, 18(2), 63-73. doi:10.1111/cp.12016
Fagan, J., Bernd, E., & Whiteman, V. (2007). Adolescent fathers' parenting stress, social support, and involvement with infants. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 17(1), 1-22. doi:10.1111/j.1532-7795.2007.00510.x

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Responsible Party: Rita Sue Lasiter, Principal Investigator, University of Missouri, Kansas City
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03921892     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2019000019
First Posted: April 19, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 12, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No