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High School Football and Adult Health

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03914573
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 16, 2019
Last Update Posted : April 18, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Pennsylvania

Brief Summary:
The primary aim of the study is to determine the effect of playing high school football on self-rated health in late adulthood. This is an observational study that will use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a longitudinal cohort of high school graduates from 1957, to compare graduates who played high school football with comparable graduates who did not play football on self-rated health, pain, functional ability, and weight at the age of 65 years.

Condition or disease
Health Impairment Pain Obesity

Detailed Description:

Data will be used from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), a long-term study of a random sample of 10,317 men and women who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957 to determine the association between participation in high-school football and self-rated health, pain, and obesity in late adulthood. The WLS is an optimal observational dataset to answer these hypotheses. WLS captures early-life exposures that are important predictors of health and well-being in later life such parental socioeconomic status, occupation, and education level, family structure, and race. It also captures whether study participants participated in high school football and contains detailed measurements of their health in adulthood. WLS provides a robust and longitudinal dataset, overcoming the limitations of prior cross-sectional studies, to compare the health in later adulthood of those who played high school football to those who did not, after carefully controlling for a potential confounders

A matched observational study will be conducted, in which football players and controls will be divided into smaller subgroups which are relatively homogeneous along a range of baseline covariates. The outcomes will be compared within each matched set, after adjusting for residual imbalances in the distribution of these baseline covariates between the football players and controls.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 3355 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Observational Study of the Association of Participation in High School Football on Health in Late Adulthood
Actual Study Start Date : January 1957
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2003
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2011



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Self-rated Health [ Time Frame: Collected in 2003-2005 when participants were aged 65 ]
    Subjects reported whether their health was excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. We dichotomized subjects' responses, coding "excellent", "very good", and "good" as 0 and coding "fair" and "poor" as 1


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Pain that limits activities [ Time Frame: Collected in 2003-2005 when participants were aged 65 ]
    Subjects reported whether during the past 4 weeks, how many of their activities were limited by pain or discomfort. We coded subject responses as 1 if they responded that some, most, or all of their activities were limited and 0 if they responded that none or a few activities were limited.

  2. Difficulty in Activities of Daily Living [ Time Frame: Collected in 2003-2005 when participants were aged 65 ]
    Subjects reported whether during the past 4 weeks, have they been able to eat, bathe, dress and use the toilet without difficulty. We coded 0 for no difficulty and 1 for any difficulty.

  3. Maximum Lifetime Body Mass Index [ Time Frame: Collected in the WLS mail survey in 2004 ]
    Subjects reported their maximum lifetime weight and the age at which they weighed the most. From these responses, we computed the maximum adult BMI for each subject who reported that they reached their maximum weight when they were 18 years old or older.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Gender Based Eligibility:   Yes
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population
Graduates of Wisconsin high schools in 1957. The data comes from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), a long-term study of a random sample of 10,317 men and women who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

• Male

Exclusion Criteria:

  • No yearbook information available to determine football playing status
  • Sports participation in yearbook was not recorded under senior photo or in an index
  • Played a high contact sport other than football (e.g. hockey)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03914573


Locations
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United States, Massachusetts
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, 02139
United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pennsylvania
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Timothy Gaulton, MD University of Pennsylvania
Principal Investigator: Sameer Deshpande, PhD Massachusetts Insitute of Technology
Principal Investigator: Dylan Small, PhD University of Pennsylvania
Principal Investigator: Mark D Neuman, MD University of Pennsylvania
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Responsible Party: University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03914573    
Other Study ID Numbers: 833020
First Posted: April 16, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 18, 2019
Last Verified: April 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by University of Pennsylvania:
health
football
pain
obesity
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight