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Trial record 48 of 1007 for:    Area Under Curve AND insulin

Practical Approaches for Interrupting Prolonged Sitting to Improve Postprandial Glucose and Protein Metabolism

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03896828
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : April 1, 2019
Last Update Posted : April 1, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Daniel Moore, University of Toronto

Brief Summary:
The present study will determine the impact of interrupting prolonged sitting with short, 2-minute walks or body-weight squats on: i) postprandial glycemia and insulinemia, and; ii) postprandial utilization of dietary amino acids. We hypothesize that postprandial glycemia and insulinemia will be similarly improved by interrupting prolonged sitting with short walks or body-weight squats, whereas postprandial utilization of dietary amino acids will only be improved by interrupting prolonged sitting with body-weight squats.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Healthy Adults Dietary Supplement: Mixed-macronutrient meal Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for chronic disease and premature mortality. Despite a growing awareness of the health risks associated with prolonged sitting, Americans spend upwards of 10 hours per day in a sedentary state. Many leisure-time activities and careers of modern society involve prolonged sitting, necessitating an urgent need to identify strategies that mitigate the health consequences of these behaviors. Recent evidence suggests that interrupting prolonged periods of sitting with short breaks of walking or cycling improve postprandial glucose and lipid handling throughout the day. Thus, relatively small quantities of movement represent an efficacious strategy for improving indices of metabolic health. However, more cost-effective and practical interventions that do not require extra space (i.e. walking) or equipment (i.e. cycling or a treadmill desk) beyond one's immediate sedentary space (e.g. office, desk) would help reduce real and/or perceived barriers of adopting this efficacious disease risk-reduction behavior. A currently understudied consequence of prolonged sitting may also be a desensitization of skeletal muscle's ability to use ingested protein, which overtime can result in detriments to the quantity and quality of this important tissue. Body-weight resistance exercise (RE) can augment the body's ability to use ingested protein to support the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass, and therefore may represent a novel exercise mode to minimize consequences of prolonged sitting. The proposed research will be the first to investigate the influence of interrupting prolonged sitting with short breaks of body-weight resistance exercise (RE) on postprandial glucose and protein metabolism. Importantly, the efficacy of this approach will be directly compared to short breaks of walking, which has previously been reported to improve postprandial glycemia in healthy adults.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 14 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Fourteen men and women will visit the lab on three separate occasions and will remain seated at a desk all-day (Visit 1) or interrupt this sitting every 30-minutes with either 2-minute walking-breaks (Visit 2) or with 15 body-weight squats (repeatedly rising from a chair and onto tip-toes, Visit 3).
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Practical Approaches for Interrupting Prolonged Sitting to Improve Postprandial Glucose and Protein Metabolism
Actual Study Start Date : October 19, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 1, 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 1, 2019

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Sedentary
Sedentary (SED): Participants will remain seated in the lab all-day (7.5 hr).
Dietary Supplement: Mixed-macronutrient meal
Participants will be provided a mixed-macronutrient meal (liquid drink) at hours "0" and "3", mimicking the energy and macronutrient composition of breakfast and lunch in Western society (38). 20% of daily energy intake will be provided as "breakfast" and 30% at lunch. Macronutrient composition will reflect a diet providing 55% energy needs from carbohydrate (CHO) and 1.2g/kg/d protein. The remaining energy requirements, as determined by total energy intake, will be met with dietary fat (estimated to be ~0.2 and 0.3g/kg fat for breakfast and lunch, respectively), similar to previous liquid mixed-meal approaches.

Experimental: Walking Breaks
Walking breaks (WALK): Participants will perform 2-minute walking breaks at 3.1 mph on a treadmill every 30 minutes (7.5 hr).
Dietary Supplement: Mixed-macronutrient meal
Participants will be provided a mixed-macronutrient meal (liquid drink) at hours "0" and "3", mimicking the energy and macronutrient composition of breakfast and lunch in Western society (38). 20% of daily energy intake will be provided as "breakfast" and 30% at lunch. Macronutrient composition will reflect a diet providing 55% energy needs from carbohydrate (CHO) and 1.2g/kg/d protein. The remaining energy requirements, as determined by total energy intake, will be met with dietary fat (estimated to be ~0.2 and 0.3g/kg fat for breakfast and lunch, respectively), similar to previous liquid mixed-meal approaches.

Experimental: Resistance-exercise breaks
Resistance exercise breaks (RE): Participants will perform 15 "squats" (1-minute) every 30 minutes. To reduce the risk of injury, standardize squat-depth, and recruit similar muscle groups as walking, the squats performed will be a "chair-stand with calf-raise" (7.5 hr).
Dietary Supplement: Mixed-macronutrient meal
Participants will be provided a mixed-macronutrient meal (liquid drink) at hours "0" and "3", mimicking the energy and macronutrient composition of breakfast and lunch in Western society (38). 20% of daily energy intake will be provided as "breakfast" and 30% at lunch. Macronutrient composition will reflect a diet providing 55% energy needs from carbohydrate (CHO) and 1.2g/kg/d protein. The remaining energy requirements, as determined by total energy intake, will be met with dietary fat (estimated to be ~0.2 and 0.3g/kg fat for breakfast and lunch, respectively), similar to previous liquid mixed-meal approaches.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Postprandial insulin area under the curve (AUC) to breakfast and lunch [ Time Frame: 3-hr postprandial ]
    The plasma insulin concentration measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay area under the curve will be measured using the trapezoidal rule.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC) to breakfast and lunch [ Time Frame: 3-hr postprandial ]
    The plasma glucose concentration measured by hexokinase method area under the curve will be measured using the trapezoidal rule.

  2. Skeletal muscle dietary protein incorporation [ Time Frame: 7.5hr postprandial ]
    [2H5]Phe and [13C6]Phe incorporation into new myofibrillar (contractile) proteins will be determined by LC/MS/MS



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men and women between 18-35 yr
  • Recreationally active (≤ 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week and no more than 3 days/week of exercise)
  • VO2peak considered "good" or below based on ACSM age and sex normative values
  • Experiencing regular menstrual periods and not taking hormonal oral contraceptives (females only)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to perform physical activity as determined by the PAR-Q
  • Inability to adhere to protocol guidelines (e.g. alcohol, standardized diet)
  • Physical limitations for walking or repeatedly rising from a chair
  • Regular tobacco use
  • Illicit drug use (e.g. growth hormone, testosterone)
  • Hormonal oral contraceptive use (females only)
  • Diagnosed medical condition under the care of a physician (e.g. type 2 diabetes)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03896828


Contacts
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Contact: Jenna Gillen, Ph.D. 14169783244 jenna.gillen@utoronto.ca
Contact: Daniel Moore, Ph.D. 416-946-4088 dr.moore@utoronto.ca

Locations
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Canada, Ontario
Goldring Center for High Performance Sport Recruiting
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 2C9
Contact    416-946-0400      
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Toronto
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Daniel Moore, Ph.D University of Toronto

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Responsible Party: Daniel Moore, Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03896828     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SSW
First Posted: April 1, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 1, 2019
Last Verified: March 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Nutrients
Growth Substances
Physiological Effects of Drugs