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PROSpect: Prone and Oscillation Pediatric Clinical Trial

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03896763
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : April 1, 2019
Last Update Posted : October 24, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Duke University
University Medical Center Groningen
Boston Children’s Hospital
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, University of Pennsylvania

Brief Summary:
Severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is a life-threatening and frequent problem experienced by thousands of children each year. Little evidence supports current supportive practices during their critical illness. The overall objective of this study is to identify the best positional and/or ventilation practice that leads to improved patient outcomes in these critically ill children. We hypothesize that children with severe PARDS treated with either prone positioning or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) will demonstrate more days off the ventilator when compared to children treated with supine positioning or conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Children Other: Either supine or prone positioning and either CMV or HFOV Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
PROSpect is a two-by-two factorial, response-adaptive, randomized controlled clinical trial of supine/prone positioning and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)/high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). About 45 pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), 30 U.S. and 15 international, with at least 5 years of experience with prone positioning and HFOV in the care of pediatric patients with severe Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (PARDS), that can provide back-up extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support, are participating. Eligible consecutive subjects with severe PARDS will be randomized to one of four groups: supine/CMV, prone/CMV, supine/HFOV, prone/HFOV. Subjects who fail their assigned positional and/or ventilation therapy for either persistent hypoxia or hypercapnia may receive the reciprocal therapy while being considered for ECMO cannulation. Our primary outcome is ventilator-free days (VFD) through day 28, where non-survivors receive zero VFD. We hypothesize that children with severe PARDS treated with either prone positioning or HFOV will demonstrate ≥ 2 more VFD. Our secondary outcome is nonpulmonary organ failure-free days. We will also explore the interaction effects of prone positioning with HFOV on VFDs and also investigate the impact of these interventions on 90-day in-hospital mortality and, among survivors, the duration of mechanical ventilation, PICU and hospital length of stay, and the trajectory of post-PICU functional status and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Up to 1000 subjects with severe PARDS will be randomized, stratified by age group and direct/indirect lung injury. Adaptive randomization will first occur after 400 patients are randomized and have been followed for 28 days, and every 100 patients thereafter. At these randomization update analyses, new allocation probabilities will be computed based on ongoing intention-to-treat trial results, increasing allocation to well performing arms and decreasing allocation to poorly performing arms. Data will be analyzed per intention-to-treat for the primary analyses and per-protocol received for primary, secondary and exploratory analyses.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 1000 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Two-by-two factorial, response-adaptive, randomized controlled clinical trial
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: PROSpect: Prone and Oscillation Pediatric Clinical Trial
Actual Study Start Date : May 1, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : May 2024


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Supine / CMV
Supine positioning and conventional mechanical ventilation
Other: Either supine or prone positioning and either CMV or HFOV

Supine positioning: Subjects randomized to supine positioning will remain supine.

Prone positioning: Subjects randomized to prone positioning will be positioned prone ≥16 hours/day for a maximum of 28 days.

CMV strategy: Low tidal volume to obtain exhaled Vt of 5-7 ml/kg (ideal body weight), PIP goal limited to ≤ 28 cm H2O and lung recruitment maneuver to identify best PEEP then maintained per PEEP-FiO2 grid.

HFOV strategy: Frequency at 8-12 Hz, amplitude (delta-P) 60-90 and mPaw recruitment maneuver.

Other Names:
  • Supine positioning
  • Prone positioing
  • Conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)
  • High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV)

Experimental: Prone / CMV
Prone positioning and conventional mechanical ventilation
Other: Either supine or prone positioning and either CMV or HFOV

Supine positioning: Subjects randomized to supine positioning will remain supine.

Prone positioning: Subjects randomized to prone positioning will be positioned prone ≥16 hours/day for a maximum of 28 days.

CMV strategy: Low tidal volume to obtain exhaled Vt of 5-7 ml/kg (ideal body weight), PIP goal limited to ≤ 28 cm H2O and lung recruitment maneuver to identify best PEEP then maintained per PEEP-FiO2 grid.

HFOV strategy: Frequency at 8-12 Hz, amplitude (delta-P) 60-90 and mPaw recruitment maneuver.

Other Names:
  • Supine positioning
  • Prone positioing
  • Conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)
  • High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV)

Experimental: Supine / HVOF
Supine positioning and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation
Other: Either supine or prone positioning and either CMV or HFOV

Supine positioning: Subjects randomized to supine positioning will remain supine.

Prone positioning: Subjects randomized to prone positioning will be positioned prone ≥16 hours/day for a maximum of 28 days.

CMV strategy: Low tidal volume to obtain exhaled Vt of 5-7 ml/kg (ideal body weight), PIP goal limited to ≤ 28 cm H2O and lung recruitment maneuver to identify best PEEP then maintained per PEEP-FiO2 grid.

HFOV strategy: Frequency at 8-12 Hz, amplitude (delta-P) 60-90 and mPaw recruitment maneuver.

Other Names:
  • Supine positioning
  • Prone positioing
  • Conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)
  • High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV)

Experimental: Prone / HFOV
Prone positioning and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation
Other: Either supine or prone positioning and either CMV or HFOV

Supine positioning: Subjects randomized to supine positioning will remain supine.

Prone positioning: Subjects randomized to prone positioning will be positioned prone ≥16 hours/day for a maximum of 28 days.

CMV strategy: Low tidal volume to obtain exhaled Vt of 5-7 ml/kg (ideal body weight), PIP goal limited to ≤ 28 cm H2O and lung recruitment maneuver to identify best PEEP then maintained per PEEP-FiO2 grid.

HFOV strategy: Frequency at 8-12 Hz, amplitude (delta-P) 60-90 and mPaw recruitment maneuver.

Other Names:
  • Supine positioning
  • Prone positioing
  • Conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV)
  • High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV)




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Ventilator-free Days (VFD) [ Time Frame: 28 days ]
    Our primary research hypothesis is that children with severe PARDS randomized to either prone positioning or HFOV will demonstrate more ventilator-free days. We hypothesize that a superior treatment would improve VFD by at least 2 days, a clinically meaningful difference. VFD is the number of days within 28 days that a patient is alive and free of mechanical ventilation. Improvement in VFD will be considered within the context of patient safety; specifically, patients must also exhibit a similar safety profile.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Nonpulmonary organ failure-free days (OFFD) [ Time Frame: 28 days ]
    Our secondary research hypothesis is that children with severe PARDS randomized to either prone positioning or HFOV will demonstrate more more nonpulmonary organ failure-free days. OFFD is the number of days within 28 days that a patient is alive and free of clinically significant non-pulmonary organ failure. Nonpulmonary organ failure-free days will be calculated based on the clinically important nonpulmonary organ systems (neurologic, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic) using nonpulmonary PEdiatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 (PELOD-20 scores.


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Interaction effects of prone positioning with HFOV on VFDs - number of ventilator-free days [ Time Frame: 28 days ]
    The number of ventilator-free days (VFD) will be compared between children randomized to prone/CMV and supine/HFOV to those randomized to prone/HFOV. VFD is the number of days within 28 days that a patient is alive and free of mechanical ventilation.

  2. 90-day in-hospital mortality [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
    Deaths from all causes will be monitored through hospital discharge or day 90 (whichever occurs first). The primary and secondary causes of death (as specified on the death certificate) will be recorded to allow us to probe the cause of death in PARDS.

  3. Duration of mechanical ventilation (among survivors) [ Time Frame: 28 days, 90 days ]
    Duration of mechanical ventilation provides a prospective evaluation of ventilator support independent of mortality. The duration of mechanical ventilation is defined as the time from day 0 (intubation) to the first time the endotracheal tube is continuously absent for at least 24 hours. For subjects with tracheostomies, duration of mechanical ventilation is defined as the time of initiation of assisted breathing to the first time positive pressure is <5 cm H2O (continuous or bi-level) for at least 24 hours. Duration of mechanical ventilation will be considered to be 28 days for subjects still intubated on day 28, and will be calculated for subjects who survive to hospital discharge or day 90 (whichever occurs first).

  4. PICU and hospital length of stay (among survivors) [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
    PICU length of stay (LOS) is defined as the time from day 0 (intubation) to the time of PICU discharge, while hospital LOS is defined as the time from day 0 to the time of hospital discharge. PICU and hospital LOS will be considered to be 90 days for subjects still in the PICU/hospital on day 90, and will be calculated for subjects who survive to hospital discharge or day 90 (whichever occurs first).

  5. Post PICU discharge functional status [ Time Frame: 1, 3, 6, 12 months post PICU discharge ]
    Pre and post PICU functional status will be compared. Functional status will be assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance (PCPC), Pediatric Overall Performance Category (POPC) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) score. The PCPC and POPC quantify short-term cognitive impairments and functional morbidity. Scores range from 1 to 6 for both scales with 1: good, 2: mild disability, and 6: brain death. The FSS is a valid and reliable assessment method to quantify functional status. The FSS includes 6 domains: mental status, sensory functioning, communication, motor function, feeding, and respiratory. Scores for each domain range from 1 (normal) to 5 (very severe dysfunction) with total scores ranging from 6 to 30.

  6. Post PICU discharge health-related quality of life (HRQL) [ Time Frame: 1, 3, 6, 12 months post PICU discharge ]
    Pre and post PICU health-related quality of life will be compared using the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and Infant Scales - Acute Version They are 23-item child self-report and parent proxy-report scales with four domains: physical functioning, emotional functioning, social functioning, and school functioning. Scale ranges from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating fewer problems. The PedsQL Infant Scales consist of 36-45 questions, depending on age, with 5 domains: physical functioning, physical symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and cognitive functioning. The PedsQL™ Multi-dimensional Fatigue Scale - Acute Version is an 18-item scale that encompasses three domains: General Fatigue, Sleep/Rest Fatigue and Cognitive Fatigue. Higher scores indicate better HRQOL. PedsQL Pediatric Pain Questionnaire is a generic pain instrument. Subjects capable of self-reporting identify a point on a 100 mm line that best shows the worst pain they experienced in the past week.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

Intubated and mechanically ventilated with severe PARDS for <48 hours per PALICC guidelines (chest imaging consistent with acute pulmonary parenchymal disease and OI ≥16 or OSI ≥12.3). We require two blood gases meeting severe PARDS criteria (separated by at least 4 ± 2 hours during which time the clinical team is actively working to recruit lung volume and optimize the patient's hemodynamic status per PALICC guidelines; specifically, incremental and decremental PEEP changes to optimize lung volume).

Exclusion criteria:

  • Perinatal related lung disease
  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia or congenital/acquired diaphragm paralysis
  • Respiratory failure explained by cardiac failure or fluid overload
  • Cyanotic heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Unilateral lung disease
  • Primary pulmonary hypertension
  • Intubated for status asthmaticus
  • Obstructive airway disease (e.g., bronchiolitis or disease characterized by hypercapnia with FiO2 <0.30 and/or evidence of increased resistance visible on the flow - time scalar and/or presence of intrinsic PEEP)
  • Active air leak
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans
  • Post hematopoietic stem cell transplant
  • Post lung transplant
  • Home ventilator (including noninvasive) or home oxygen dependent
  • Neuromuscular respiratory failure
  • Critical airway (e.g., post laryngotracheal surgery or new tracheostomy) or anatomical obstruction of the lower airway (e.g., mediastinal mass)
  • Facial surgery or trauma in previous 2 weeks
  • Head trauma (managed with hyperventilation)
  • Intracranial bleeding
  • Unstable spine, femur or pelvic fractures
  • Acute abdominal process/open abdomen
  • Morbid obesity (2w-24 months: WHO weight-for-length/height z-score ≥+3; ≥2 years: WHO body mass index (BMI)-for-age z-score ≥+3)
  • Received either prone positioning or any high-frequency mode of mechanical ventilation with current illness
  • Supported on ECMO during the current admission
  • Family/medical team not providing full support (patient treatment considered futile)
  • Previously enrolled in current study
  • Enrolled in any other interventional clinical trial not approved for co-enrollment
  • Known pregnancy

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03896763


Contacts
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Contact: Amy Cassidy 215-898-4151 acassidy@nursing.upenn.edu

  Show 37 Study Locations
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pennsylvania
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Duke University
University Medical Center Groningen
Boston Children’s Hospital
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Martha AQ Curley, RN, PhD University of Pennsylvania
Principal Investigator: Ira M. Cheifetz, MD Duke Children's
Principal Investigator: Martin CJ Kneyber, MD, PhD Beatrix Children's Hospital
Principal Investigator: David Wypij, PhD Boston Children’s Hospital
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, University of Pennsylvania:
Statistical Analysis Plan  [PDF] March 17, 2019
Informed Consent Form  [PDF] March 22, 2019
Study Protocol  [PDF] May 1, 2019


Additional Information:
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Responsible Party: Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, Ruth M. Colket Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nursing, University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03896763     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 831295
First Posted: April 1, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 24, 2019
Last Verified: October 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: Per NHLBI policy, we will provide a deidentified dataset and all the data-related documentation necessary to utilize the study data (dictionary, calculated variables and standard operating procedures) to the NHLBI. We will submit this dataset to the NHLBI Data Repository managed by the BioLINCC (Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center).
Supporting Materials: Study Protocol
Statistical Analysis Plan (SAP)
Informed Consent Form (ICF)
Time Frame: 3 years after the final follow-up interview or 2 years after the primary paper has been published, whichever comes first.
Access Criteria: Subject to the approval of the (1) PROSpect Ancillary Study Committee, (2) PROSpect Executive Committee, and (3) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Martha A.Q. Curley, PhD, RN, University of Pennsylvania:
Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (PARDS)
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)
acute respiratory failure
child
pediatric intensive care unit
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult
Acute Lung Injury
Syndrome
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiration Disorders
Infant, Premature, Diseases
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Lung Injury