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Burnout Syndrome Among Medical Residents

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03668080
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 12, 2018
Last Update Posted : September 12, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
matteo serenari, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi

Brief Summary:
Whether and to what extent burnout risk is actually higher in surgical specialties than in non-surgical specialties is still unknown. Little is also known about what factors are associated with burnout between surgical residents and non-surgical residents. In this context, the present study has a three-fold aim: 1) to measure the prevalence of burnout among a sample of Italian medical residents; 2) to contrast the prevalence of burnout and psychological distress in surgical residents and non-surgical residents, and 3) to identify the work-related factors associated with burnout between surgical residents and non-surgical residents.

Condition or disease
Burnout Syndrome

Detailed Description:

Surgical training is considered to be very stressful among residents and graduating medical students choose less often surgery for their career. To elaborate burnout prevention programs, the assessment of the prevalence of burnout during the early career stage of the surgeons and associated risk factors, becomes central.

Residents from the University of Bologna were asked to participate in an anonymous online survey. The residents completed a set of questions regarding their training schedule and three standardized questionnaires: 1) the Maslach Burnout Inventory, assessing the three dimensions of burnout: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA); 2) the Zung Self-Rating Depression scale; 3) the Psychosomatic Problems scale. High scores in either the EE or DP subscale categories predicted professional burnout.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 679 participants
Observational Model: Other
Time Perspective: Other
Official Title: Burnout Syndrome Among Medical Residents
Actual Study Start Date : October 16, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 5, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : November 6, 2017

Group/Cohort
surgical residents
Surgical specialties included general surgery, plastic surgery, urology, vascular surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedic surgery, pediatric surgery, cardiothoracic surgery and otolaryngology.
non-surgical residents
Non-surgical specialties included cardiology, rheumatology, neurology, pulmonary disease, endocrinology, nuclear medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, internal medicine, oncology, nephrology, hygiene and preventive medicine, anesthesiology, child and adolescent psychiatry, radiology, radiation oncology, infectious disease, dermatology, pathology, microbiology, hematology, gastroenterology, geriatric medicine, medical genetics, sports medicine, occupational and environmental medicine.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Maslach Burnout Inventory [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    a validated 22-item questionnaire that evaluates burnout in its three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE) depersonalization (DP) and personal accomplishment (PA). Responses are made on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from 0 ("never") to 6 ("daily").


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    The level of depressive symptoms was measured using the 20-item Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Items responses rank from 1 ("none or little of the time") to 4 ("most or all of the time"), and the total score range from 20 to 80 points. A score of 50 and above indicated the presence of at least mild-moderate depressive symptoms.

  2. Psychosomatic Problems Scale [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
    Psychosomatic symptoms were measured using the Psychosomatic Problems Scale, which consists of 8 items: difficulty concentrating, sleep problems, headache, stomachache, tensions, lack of appetite, feeling sad, and dizziness. Responses are rated on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 ("never") to 5 ("always"). Participants answering "often" or "always" on an item are coded as having a psychosomatic symptom.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
All the residents attending the University of Bologna in the academic year 2017/2018
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • residents attending the University of Bologna

Exclusion Criteria:

  • none

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03668080


Locations
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Italy
University of Bologna
Bologna, BO, Italy, 40100
Sponsors and Collaborators
Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi
Investigators
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Study Director: antonio d pinna, MD Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi
Publications of Results:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: matteo serenari, Principal Investigator, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03668080    
Other Study ID Numbers: 105543
First Posted: September 12, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 12, 2018
Last Verified: September 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by matteo serenari, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi:
burnout
residents
surgical residents
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Syndrome
Burnout, Psychological
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Stress, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms