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Effects of Single-task Versus Dual-task Training on balancePERFORMANCE

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03608111
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 31, 2018
Last Update Posted : July 31, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
ASLIHAN UZUNKULAOGLU, Ufuk University

Brief Summary:

Background: Impairment in the control of balance is a common problem among elderly patients especially whom with osteoarthritis (OA).

Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of single-task and dual-task training on balance performance in the elderly osteoarthritic patients with balance impairment.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Balance Impairment Other: single task balance training Other: dual task balance training Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Fifty elderly osteoarthritic patients with balance impairment were included into this study. Patients were randomly assigned to single task balance training (Group 1) or dual-task balance training (Group 2) groups. Balance activities were given to both groups for 3 times a week for 4 weeks. Patients in group 2 also performed cognitive tasks simultaneously with these exercises. Patients were evaluated with Berg balance scale (BBS), kinesthetic ability trainer (KAT 2000) static and dynamic scores, timed up and go test (TUTG) and walking speed for single and dual tasks, number of stopping and Activities Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale at the baseline and at the end of 4 weeks.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of Single-task Versus Dual-task Training on Balance Performance in Elderly Osteoarthritic Patients With Balance Impairment
Actual Study Start Date : January 1, 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 1, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : January 1, 2017

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: single task balance training Other: single task balance training
single task balance training

Other: dual task balance training
dual task balance training

Active Comparator: dual task balance training Other: single task balance training
single task balance training

Other: dual task balance training
dual task balance training




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Berg balance scale [ Time Frame: 1 month ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 90 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • included age ≥65, able to walk 10 m, no neurological or musculoskeletal diagnosis, met the criteria of balance impairment, and scored >19 on the mini mental state examination.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • neurologic or musculoskeletal diagnosis such as stroke, orthopedic involvement, significant visual and auditory impairments, severe vitamin B12 deficiency and sedative drug use.

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Responsible Party: ASLIHAN UZUNKULAOGLU, Ufuk University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03608111     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 30112015-5.
First Posted: July 31, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 31, 2018
Last Verified: July 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No