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Effects of Exercise Trainings on Pain, Function and AHD in Patients With SPS

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03494192
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 11, 2018
Last Update Posted : August 16, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Leyla Eraslan, Hacettepe University

Brief Summary:

Abnormal reduction of the AHD has been considered as one of the possible mechanisms in the aetiology of subacromial impingement syndrome. Maintenance of the AHD is crucial for prevention and rehabilitation of rotator cuff related disorders.

The development of a rehabilitation treatment plan is based in part on the assessment of scapular motion and muscle deficits in patients with shoulder pain. Rehabilitation should be based on the identified impairments.

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of scapula based and scapula&rotator cuff based rehabilitation programs on symptoms, functional limitations and AHD in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome and compare with health population.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Other: scapula based Other: scapula&rotator cuff based Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Coordinated motion between the humerus and scapula is required for pain-free arm movement. Rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles dynamically control the subacromial space or acromiohumeral distance (AHD).Scapulothoracic muscles need to provide stability and control in a synchronized fashion to facilitate normal scapulohumeral movement. Scapular upward rotation and posterior tilt is essential to maintain the AHD.Therefore, the force couple function of the rotator cuff muscles play an critical role in opposing the superior migration force that is generated by deltoid muscle and, to maintenance the subacromial space.

Abnormal reduction of the AHD has been considered as one of the possible mechanisms in the aetiology of subacromial impingement syndrome. Maintenance of the AHD is crucial for prevention and rehabilitation of rotator cuff related disorders.

The development of a rehabilitation treatment plan is based in part on the assessment of scapular motion and muscle deficits in patients with shoulder pain. Rehabilitation should be based on the identified impairments.

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of scapula based and scapula&rotator cuff based rehabilitation programs on symptoms, functional limitations and AHD in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome and compare with health population.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 42 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effect Of Scapula Based and Scapula&Rotator Cuff Based Exercise Trainings on Pain, Function and Acromiohumeral Distance in Patients With Subacromial Pain Syndrome And Comparison With Healthy Controls
Actual Study Start Date : August 1, 2018
Actual Primary Completion Date : August 15, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : August 15, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: scapula based
  • Cold pack
  • Stretching Exercises
  • Exercise training focus on scapulothoracic muscles will be applied two times per week total 12 week
Other: scapula based
physiotherapy program consists of cold pack, supervised stretching and scapulothoracic muscles strengthening exercises and home exercise programme including stretching and strengthening exercises will be applied two times a week total 24 sessions
Other Name: scapula based training group

Experimental: scapula&rotator cuff based
  • Cold pack
  • Stretching Exercises
  • Exercise training focus on scapulothoracic muscles
  • Exercise training focus on rotator cuff muscles will be applied two times per week total 12 week
Other: scapula&rotator cuff based
physiotherapy program consists of cold pack, supervised stretching and scapulothoracic and also rotator cuff muscles strengthening exercises and home exercise programme including stretching and strengthening exercises will be applied two times a week total 24 sessions
Other Name: scapula&rotator cuff based training group




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. pain assessment [ Time Frame: from baseline to twelve week after treatment sessions ]
    pain intensity will de assessed by using Visual Analog Scale at rest, activity and at night. All assessment will be recorded at baseline and at the end of the twelve week treatment sessions


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Acromiohumeral Distance Measurement [ Time Frame: from baseline to twelve week after treatment sessions ]
    Acromiohumeral Distance will be measured by 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° of shoulder abduction and participants doing scapular retraction with resistive elastic band at each shoulder position. All assessment will be recorded at baseline and at the end of the twelve week treatment sessions

  2. Functional Level [ Time Frame: from baseline to twelve week after treatment sessions ]
    functional level will be assessed by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADİ). All assessment will be recorded at baseline and at the end of the twelve week treatment sessions



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 45 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • painful arc of movement during flexion or abduction;
  • positive Neer or Kennedy-Hawkins impingement signs
  • pain on resisted lateral rotation, abduction or empty can test.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • previous shoulder surgery;
  • shoulder pain reproduced by neck movement;
  • clinical signs of full-thickness RC tears; or
  • shoulder capsulitis.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03494192


Locations
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Turkey
Hacettepe University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Dept. of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation
Ankara, Turkey, 06100
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hacettepe University
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Responsible Party: Leyla Eraslan, PhD Candidate, Hacettepe University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03494192    
Other Study ID Numbers: KA-180018
First Posted: April 11, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 16, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Plan Description: We will share IPD when we recruiting the patients

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Leyla Eraslan, Hacettepe University:
acromiohumeral distance
pain
functional level
Subacromial Impingement Syndrome
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
Syndrome
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Wounds and Injuries
Shoulder Injuries
Joint Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases