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It's Your Game: An Innovative Approach to Preventing Teen Dating Violence

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03482687
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 29, 2018
Last Update Posted : March 29, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Melissa Peskin, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to evaluate Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships, a classroom- and computer-based healthy relationships and dating violence prevention curriculum for 6th grade students, in a large, urban public school district in Southeast Texas.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Adolescent Behavior Interpersonal Relationships Domestic Violence Physical Violence Behavioral: Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
The purpose of this three year study is to evaluate Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships, a classroom- and computer-based healthy relationships and dating violence prevention curriculum for 6th grade students, in a large, urban public school district in Southeast Texas. This curriculum was adapted from an existing effective sex education and relationship curriculum, It's Your Game…Keep it Real (IYG), which was enhanced to more explicitly address teen dating violence (TDV) and encompass multiple levels of the social-ecological model (e.g., youth, family, school staff). A randomized two-arm, nested design was conducted among 6th grade students, where students receiving the curriculum were compared to students receiving usual care. Ten middle schools participated in the study, five schools were randomly assigned to receive the curriculum and five to receive usual care. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, immediately following the intervention, and 12 months after baseline. Parental permission and student assent were obtained prior to administration of the surveys. The primary hypothesis is that students who receive the curriculum will have significantly lower TDV perpetration than those who do not receive the curriculum.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 834 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: It's Your Game: An Innovative Approach to Preventing Teen Dating Violence
Study Start Date : September 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2015

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships
Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships is a classroom- and computer-based healthy relationships curriculum for middle school students. It consists of thirteen 25-minute lessons: 5 classroom, 5 computer-only, and 3 classroom-computer hybrid.
Behavioral: Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships
Me & You: Building Healthy Relationships is a classroom- and computer-based healthy relationships curriculum for middle school students. It consists of thirteen 25-minute lessons: 5 classroom, 5 computer-only, and 3 classroom-computer hybrid. The curriculum integrates group-based classroom activities (e.g., role-plays, group discussion, and other skill-building activities) and computer-based activities, some of which are individually tailored. The curriculum was adapted from an existing effective sex education and relationship curriculum, It's Your Game…Keep it Real (IYG), which was enhanced to more explicitly address teen dating violence (TDV).

No Intervention: Comparison Group
No intervention was provided, only usual care.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percent of youth who perpetrated any type of teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  2. Percent of youth who were victimized by any type of teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percent of youth who perpetrated psychological teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  2. Percent of youth who were victimized by psychological teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  3. Percent of youth who perpetrated physical teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  4. Percent of youth who were victimized by physical teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  5. Percent of youth who perpetrated sexual teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  6. Percent of youth who were victimized by sexual teen dating violence as indicated by the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wolfe et al.

  7. Percent of youth who perpetrated electronic teen dating violence as indicated measures adapted from Picard and Zweig [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Picard et al. and Zweig et al.

  8. Percent of youth who were victimized by electronic teen dating violence as indicated measures adapted from Picard and Zweig [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Picard et al. and Zweig et al.

  9. Mean score reflecting student norms toward violence for boys and girls as indicated byt the Acceptance of Dating Abuse Survey [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Foshee et al.

  10. Mean score for self-efficacy to resolve conflict as indicated by the Teen Conflict Survey [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Dahlberg et al.

  11. Percent of youth reported one or more positive coping strategies as indicated by the Kidcope-Child Survey Form [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Kidcope-Child Form by Laslo et al.

  12. Mean score of constructive and destructive conflict resolution skills as indicated by valid scales developed by Foshee et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Foshee et al.

  13. Mean score for attitudes towards sexting as indicated by a scale developed by Strassberg et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Strassberg et al.

  14. Mean score related to a student's belief in the need for help for dating violence victimization as indicated by measures developed by Foshee et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Foshee et al.

  15. Mean score for perceived peer dating violence perpetration (from the perspective of student) - newly developed [ Time Frame: One year ]
    newly developed self-report measure

  16. Mean score for parental communication about drugs, sex, and relationships as indicated by measures developed by Tharp et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Tharp and Noonan

  17. Percent of youth who indicated social support from source as indicated by measures adapted from the Social Support Rating Scale [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Cauce et al.

  18. Percent of youth who perpetrated bullying as indicated by measures developed by Wang et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wang et al.

  19. Percent of youth who were victimized by bullying as indicated by measures developed from Wang et al. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Validated self report measure by Wang et al.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   11 Years to 14 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 6th graders attending regular classes in ten study schools in large, urban school district in Southeast Texas

Exclusion Criteria:

  • No students were excluded based on race/ethnicity, age, or gender.
  • Students were informed that surveys and the intervention were only available in English and were asked to consider their comfort level with participating in the study.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03482687


Locations
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United States, Texas
Melissa Fleschler Peskin
Houston, Texas, United States, 77030
Sponsors and Collaborators
The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Melissa Peskin, PhD University of Texas Houston School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Susan Tortolero Emery, PhD University of Texas Houston School of Public Health

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Responsible Party: Melissa Peskin, Associate Professor, Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03482687    
Other Study ID Numbers: HSC-SPH-12-0593
First Posted: March 29, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 29, 2018
Last Verified: March 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Melissa Peskin, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston:
adolescent behavior
interpersonal relationships
intimate partner violence
violence/prevention & control
program evaluation
teen dating violence