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Repeated Sweet Breakfasts and Subsequent Sweet Food Preferences and Intakes

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03442829
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : February 22, 2018
Last Update Posted : August 15, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of Bristol, UK
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Bournemouth University

Brief Summary:
This study will assess the impact of repeated sweet breakfast consumption versus repeated non-sweet breakfast consumption on subsequent sweet and non-sweet food preferences and intakes

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Repeated Sweet Food Consumption Behavioral: Sweet food consumption Behavioral: Non-sweet food consumption Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Participants will be randomized to receive either sweet or non-sweet breakfasts for three consecutive weeks, and impacts on food preferences and intakes will be assessed at baseline, after 1 week, and after three weeks. Preferences for sweet and non-sweet foods will be assessed during two taste tests at each assessment time, where six different foods will be rated. Sweet and non-sweet food consumption will also be measured at two meals at each assessment time - breakfast and lunch. Identical buffet meals composed of sweet and non-sweet foods suitable for consumption at breakfast and lunch will be provided ad-libitum.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 45 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Masking Description: Intervention allocation will be undertaken by a researcher not directly involved with participants following randomization by drawing lots.
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Impact of Repeated Sweet Breakfasts on Subsequent Sweet Food Preferences and Intakes
Actual Study Start Date : February 23, 2018
Actual Primary Completion Date : August 1, 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 31, 2019

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Sweet food consumption
Sweet breakfasts. Participants are asked to consume a sweet breakfast every day. All foods will be provided.
Behavioral: Sweet food consumption
Sweet food consumption at breakfast

Active Comparator: Non-sweet food consumption
Non-sweet breakfasts. Participants are asked to consume a non-sweet breakfast every day. All foods will be provided.
Behavioral: Non-sweet food consumption
Non-sweet food consumption at breakfast




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Food preferences [ Time Frame: 3 weeks from baseline ]
    Ratings of three sweet and three non-sweet foods during a taste test (two tests). Ratings measured using 100mm VAS scales for different hedonic factors - pleasure, sweetness, desire to eat). Scores range from 0-100 where 0=least and 100=greatest for each hedonic factor.

  2. Food intake [ Time Frame: 3 weeks from baseline ]
    Amount of sweet and non-sweet foods consumed during breakfast and lunch


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Hunger ratings [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks ]
    Ratings of subjective perceptions (two meals). Ratings measured using 100mm VAS scales for different subjective factors - hunger, thirst, fullness). Scores range from 0-100 where 0=least and 100=greatest for each subjective factor.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • No known food allergy
  • No known taste or appetite abnormalities
  • Non-smoker
  • Habitually eats breakfast
  • Able to provide consent and complete all study measures

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03442829


Locations
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United Kingdom
Bournemouth University
Bournemouth, US And Canada Only, United Kingdom, BH12 5BB
Sponsors and Collaborators
Bournemouth University
University of Bristol, UK
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Katherine Appleton, PhD Bournemouth University, UK
Principal Investigator: Peter Rogers, PhD University of Bristol, UK

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Responsible Party: Bournemouth University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03442829     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: KAPR2018
First Posted: February 22, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 15, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: The full study protocol is currently available from the PI on reasonable request. All generated data will be available from the PI, following completion and publication of the work on reasonable request.
Supporting Materials: Study Protocol
Statistical Analysis Plan (SAP)
Time Frame: Data will be available following completion and publication of the study. Data will be stored for ten years following publication of the work.
Access Criteria: Direct contact and reasonable request of the PI.

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Bournemouth University:
sweet taste, food preferences, food intake