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Influence of Cooling on the Effect of Strength Training (IceAge)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03332446
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 6, 2017
Last Update Posted : November 17, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Anne Krieg M.D., Saarland University

Brief Summary:
The aim of this study is to investigate if regular cold water immersion after strength training has a negative influence on the desired training-induced performance enhancement.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Strength Training Effects Other: cold water immersion Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Recovery strategies represent a not sufficiently investigated chance in elite training control to optimize the complete training process. Coaches and athletes are confronted with numerous potentially effective recovery methods, e.g. cooling, warming, active recovery, compression, massage or power naps. However, the effectivity of these methods has rarely been investigated under controlled scientific conditions. Based on the state of the art,so far hardly any definite practical conclusions regarding effective recovery methods can be drawn, especially regarding sport-specific strategies and settings. Currently, cold water immersion is a particularly popular recovery strategy. However, there are hints that repeated cooling interventions after training can impair the training effect. This could potentially be caused by a faster reconstitution of homeostasis due to cooling. For fast recovery of performance, this effect would be desirable, but at the same time these homeostatic disturbances are the basis of signal processes leading to training adaptations.

The aim of this study is to investigate if regular cold water immersion after strength training has a negative influence on the desired training-induced performance enhancement.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 11 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Influence of Cooling on the Effect of Strength Training
Study Start Date : August 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : July 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Drinking Water

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: cooling
strength training and cold water immersion
Other: cold water immersion
10 min at 12-15°C

No Intervention: control
strength training and no cold water immersion



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. 1 Repetition Maximum [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    Maximum weight in kg that can be successfully moved in a leg press


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Counter Movement Jump [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    Maximum jump height in cm in a counter movement jump, measured with a force plate

  2. blood parameters [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    CRP, CK, IL-6, IGF-1

  3. muscle biopsy [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    p70S6, PAX7+, NCAM+

  4. muscle thickness [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    upper leg circumference in cm

  5. subjective restfulness of sleep [ Time Frame: 2 weeks ]
    5-point Likert scale on subjective restfulness of sleep (1: very, 5: not at all)

  6. time in bed [ Time Frame: 2 weeks ]
    Questionnaire recording time of going to bed (time in hh:mm), sleep onset latency (duration in min), waking time (time in hh:mm), and time of getting up (time in hh:mm). From these items, the average time in bed per day is calculated, starting at "time of going to bed" and ending at "time of getting up".

  7. sleeping time [ Time Frame: 2 weeks ]
    Questionnaire recording time of going to bed (time in hh:mm), sleep onset latency (duration in min), waking time (time in hh:mm), and time of getting up (time in hh:mm). From these items, the average sleeping time per day is calculated, starting at "time of going to bed + sleep onset latency" and ending at "waking time".

  8. questionnaire on recovery and stress [ Time Frame: 2 weeks ]
    Short Recovery and Stress Scale for Sport (SRSS): assessing recovery (physical performance capability, mental performance capability, emotional balance, overall recovery) and stress (muscular stress, lack of activation, negative emotional state, overall stress), each item is rated on a 7-point rating scale (0: does not apply at all, 6: fully applies). For evaluation, two outcome values ("recovery" and "stress") are calculated as the sum of the corresponding subvalues, i.e. each outcome value is on a 25-point scale (0: does not apply at all, 24: fully applies).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • healthy, 18-40 years, strength training experience, 8 weeks no leg strength training

Exclusion Criteria:

-


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03332446


Locations
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Germany
Saarland University
Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany, 66123
Sponsors and Collaborators
Saarland University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Tim Meyer, Prof. Saarland University

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Responsible Party: Anne Krieg M.D., Medical Doctor and Researcher, Saarland University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03332446     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2512BI1901
First Posted: November 6, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 17, 2017
Last Verified: November 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Keywords provided by Anne Krieg M.D., Saarland University:
cold water immersion, strength training, training effect