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Effects of Dance Practice in Elementary Students

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03278366
Recruitment Status : Enrolling by invitation
First Posted : September 11, 2017
Last Update Posted : June 18, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sarah DiPasquale, Skidmore College

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to assess changes in benchmark and state assessment scores in a public elementary school following an intervention of dance integration into the daily routine of the classroom. Furthermore, this study aims to assess if dance may improve student behavior, teacher perception of student behavior, reading level and attendance.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Educational Activities Behavioral: Dancing Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The use of movement in primary school classrooms is a longstanding practice drawn upon by teachers in various ways. Dance movement in particular is popular among teachers for several reasons: it is enjoyable for students, it can be imaginative, it engages the body as well as the brain, and it can be made accessible to students of varying abilities.

In the field of education, the use of brief bouts of physical activity (PA) or 'brain breaks' have been gaining attention. Teachers have reported perceived improved student concentration during the academic school day by utilizing PA in both elementary and middle school populations. Carlson et al. suggest that PA breaks can indeed improve overall student behavior in the classroom while Donnelly and Lambourne report a 6% improvement on standardized tests in classrooms incorporating PA into academic lessons. Erwin et al. describe improvements in math and reading fluency standardized test scores following an intervention of PA incorporated into an elementary classroom. More conclusive research is indeed needed, yet incorporating PA into the culture of an academic environment appears to hold some merit.

The US Department of Education alongside the National Dance Education Organization published a paper outlining the research priorities for dance education in 2004.

"Of 20 Issues researched in the Research Dance Education project, 15 Issues were identified as gaps, and are therefore identified as Issues in need of future research…The 15 severely under-researched issues over decades impact policy and pedagogy at state and national levels, specifically: Multicultural Education, Integrated Arts, Policy, Affective Domain, Interdisciplinary Education, Student Achievement, Equity, National Content Standards, Funding, Student Performance, Children at Risk, Certification, Teacher Standards, Uncertified Teachers, and Brain Research."

Despite this call to action over a decade ago, to the investigators knowledge, a study assessing change in academic performance following an intervention of dance in a public school serving students with high rates of economic disadvantage has not been published.

The purpose of this study is to assess changes in benchmark and state assessment scores in a public elementary school following an intervention of dance integration into the daily routine of the classroom. Furthermore, this study aims to assess if dance may improve student behavior, teacher perception of student behavior, reading level and attendance. The investigators hypothesize that positive improvements may be observed in all variables by integrating dance into the academic classroom.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 200 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Effects of Dance Practice on Assessment Score Performance, Behavior and Attendance in a Public School District With High Rates of Economically Disadvantaged Elementary Students.
Actual Study Start Date : October 1, 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 30, 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 30, 2022

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Dancing students
Students will participate in dance activities from a video with their teacher in class.
Behavioral: Dancing
Participants in the intervention group will participate in daily dance activities with their teacher by following along with a video created by the dance researchers at Skidmore College. Teachers will be specifically asked to utilize the movement phrases just prior to administering any formal assessment activity within their classroom (tempo may be chosen at teacher's discretion). Furthermore, teachers may choose to utilize the dance phrases as 'brain breaks' at any point throughout their school day.

No Intervention: Non-Dancing Students
Students will continue with typical classroom activities in class and will not participate in dancing activities



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Benchmark/Summative assessments [ Time Frame: Baseline, 8 weeks, 16 weeks, 24 weeks. ]
    Unit/chapter assessments in Math and English Language Arts

  2. Change in State Assessment scores [ Time Frame: Baseline and 9 months. ]
  3. Attendance/tardiness [ Time Frame: 10 months. ]
    Student attendance

  4. Change in Reading Level [ Time Frame: Baseline, 8 weeks, 16 weeks, 24 weeks. ]
    Fountas and Pinnell reading level


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Teacher perception of dance intervention [ Time Frame: Baseline and 9 months. ]
    Survey of teachers knowledge and perception of dance in the classroom

  2. Documented Student Behavior [ Time Frame: 10 months. ]
    Referrals to principals office



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Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 12 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

Inclusion criteria:

  • Registration in an elementary classroom at Boulevard Elementary school, Gloversville Enlarged School District; Gloversville, New York
  • Registration in an elementary classroom Park Terrace Elementary school, Gloversville Enlarged School District; Gloversville, New York
  • Participating in a classroom where teacher is utilizing dance integration into their curriculum.

Exclusion Criteria:

• None


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03278366


Locations
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United States, New York
Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, New York, United States, 12866
Sponsors and Collaborators
Skidmore College
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Sarah DiPasquale, DPT Skidmore College
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Responsible Party: Sarah DiPasquale, Assistant Professor, Skidmore College
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03278366    
Other Study ID Numbers: 1704-605
First Posted: September 11, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 18, 2020
Last Verified: June 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: A linking list for students will be compiled by the school Principal, numerically coding each student into a password protected document. This student linking list will be kept on a locked district owned, password protected computer at the school, separate from this database. It will be kept solely on that computer hard drive so it will not be accessible to Principal at home. Neither the PI, nor any other Skidmore researchers will have access to this locked computer and therefore, will not have ability to gain access to this list in any capacity. Skidmore researchers will never have access to student names/identities.

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No