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Motivational Resistance-training Program on Adherence and Body Composition in Elderly

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03201081
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : June 28, 2017
Last Update Posted : June 28, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Pablo Jorge Marcos Pardo, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

Brief Summary:
Lack of physical activity is one of the major causes for obesity and functional disability in the elderly. Including regular exercise in elderly´s lifestyle is not an easy task. The main objective was to analyse the effect of a motivational resistance-training programme on satisfying the individual´s psychological needs, level of self-determination and body composition. A quasi-experimental study was performed with 47 volunteers (29 females, 18 males) of 67-75 years of age, divided into two groups: experimental (n = 27) and control (n = 20). A 12-week intervention programme was performed, with a total of 36 sessions.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Motivation Body Weight Other: Motivational resistance-training programme Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 47 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: A quasi-experimental design (2x2) was developed, dividing the participants into two groups; one experimental and one control. In this design, an initial measurement prior to the intervention (pre-test) and a measurement after the intervention (post-test) were conducted. The sampling was natural and intentional.
Masking: Single (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Impact of a Motivational Resistance-training Program on Adherence and Body Composition in Elderly
Actual Study Start Date : January 15, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 15, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : June 15, 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: training group
The training group, based on motivational strategies were performed and a moderate intensity training (8 to 12 repetitions). The load was increased: during the 12 weeks from 65% 1-RM to 80% 1-RM, performing individual more than the prescribed number of repetitions (12 repetitions). A 1-2 minutes resting period was allowed between sets. There was no attempt to control the velocity of the repetitions performed. Prior to each training session, the volunteers performed a specific warmup, consisting of 10 repetitions with approximately 50% of the load used in the first and second exercises of the training session. A total of 36 sessions were performed during the training period. This group was compared with no interventions subjects.
Other: Motivational resistance-training programme
The experimental group exercised at a moderate intensity (8 to 12 repetitions). The load was increased during the 12 weeks from 65% 1-RM to 80% 1-RM. This training load was increased when the individual could perform more than the prescribed number of repetitions (12 repetitions), following the OMNI-RES scale and a hard effort perception level.74 A 1-2 minutes resting period was allowed between sets. During the sessions, the participants were verbally encouraged to perform the complete range of motion for each exercise and received motivational strategies.

No Intervention: control group
The control group, did not participate in the motivational resistance-training program.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change of behavioural regulation during exercise [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline behavioural regulation during exercise at 12 weeks ]
    To evaluate the type of motivational regulation related to physical exercise. The Spanish version of Behavioural Regulation during Exercise Questionnaire was used. This questionnaire allows to 13 evaluate the type of motivational regulation related to physical exercise, and consists in 14 23 items distributed in three dimensions, based on the established distinction in the SDT 15 between autonomous motivation, controlled motivation and demotivation.

  2. Change of basic psychological needs during exercise. [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline Basic psychological needs during exercise at 12 weeks ]
    To assess the perceived need satisfaction of the participant. satisfaction of the participants, the Spanish adaptation of the Basic Psychological Needs 4 in Exercise Scale was used. The questionnaire includes 12 items distributed in three 6 dimensions.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change of body weight (kg) [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline body weight (kg) at 12 weeks ]
    After removal of shoes and heavy outer clothing,using a Tanita BC-418 MA scale, (Tanita Corporation, Arlington Heights, IL) to the 24 nearest 0.1 kg

  2. Change of standing height (cm) [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline standing height (cm) at 12 weeks ]
    Assessed without shoes was measured using a Seca 202 stadiometer (Seca, Hamburg, Germany) to the nearest 0.1 cm.

  3. Change of Body Mass Index (BMI): (kg/m^2) [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline Body Mass Index (BMI): (kg/m^2) at 12 weeks ]
    was calculated as the ratio of weight to squared height

  4. Change of bioelectrical impedance Muscle mass (kg) [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline bioelectrical impedance Muscle mass (kg) at 12 weeks ]
    Was measured using the Tanita BC-418 MA scale, with participants standing barefooted on the analyser's footpads, and holding its handles.

  5. Change of bioelectrical impedance Fat mass (%) [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline bioelectrical impedance fat mass (kg) at 12 weeks ]
    Was measured using the Tanita BC-418 MA scale, with participants standing barefooted on the analyser's footpads, and holding its handles.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   65 Years to 75 Years   (Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Gender Based Eligibility:   Yes
Gender Eligibility Description:   older people
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Never previously attended classes in fitness academies or were not currently performing regular physical activity, and had no previous experience with resistance-training programmes

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any history of neuromuscular, metabolic, hormonal or cardiovascular diseases; not taking any medication that could influence hormonal and neuromuscular metabolism.
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Responsible Party: Pablo Jorge Marcos Pardo, Principal Investigator, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03201081    
Other Study ID Numbers: PMAFI/03/12
First Posted: June 28, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 28, 2017
Last Verified: June 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Pablo Jorge Marcos Pardo, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia:
elderly
motivation
adherence
resistance-training
health
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms