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The Effect High Velocity Low Amplitude Hip Mobilization on Strength in Subjects With Lower Extremity Pathology

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03115879
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 14, 2017
Last Update Posted : April 14, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Diego Galace de Freitas, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo

Brief Summary:

Introduction: Lower extremity weakness associated with musculoskeletal pathology can cause activity limitations. Physical therapy intervention in the form of exercise is commonly directed at improving muscular performance, however, neuromuscular adaptations may limit the effectiveness of traditional strengthening exercises. Manual therapy techniques have been used as a disinhibitory intervention to increase muscle activation and strength before participating in strengthening exercises or performing functional tasks While there is recent evidence to support joint mobilization as a valuable manual therapy disinhibitory intervention Currently, there is no evidence to substantiate anecdotal experience that a HVLAT hip distraction mobilization improves muscle performance in subjects with lower extremity pathology and lower extremity weakness. The purpose of this study was to determine if a HVLAT hip distraction mobilization would result in an immediate change of maximal force output of the quadriceps, gluteus maximus and gluteus medius.

Methods: Forty individuals with a lower extremity pathology volunteered for this study. Inclusion criteria were having a unilateral musculoskeletal pathology, being greater than 18 years of age, 10% decrease in muscle strength in symptomatic side compared to healthy side, and absence of medical precautions that would prevent a maximal effort strength test and exclusion criteria included individuals with a history lower extremity recent muscle or tendon ruptures (within the past 6 months) and postoperative knee, hip and ankle surgery. Demographic data, including diagnosis from referring physician were collected. All subjects completed the Lower extremity function scale (LEFS). A single evaluator blinded to the involved extremity was responsible for quadriceps, gluteus medius and maximus strength analysis pre and post mobilization of both symptomatic and non-symptomatic sides. The subject underwent the HVLAT hip distraction mobilization of the symptomatic side, and an immediate re-assessment of strength of both symptomatic and non-symptomatic sides followed the mobilization.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Hip Joint Muscle Weakness Other: Hip mobilization Other: Hip manipulation simulation Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 40 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Effect of High Velocity Low Amplitude Hip Mobilization on Strength in Subjects With Lower Extremity Pathology
Actual Study Start Date : February 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : October 2016

Arm Intervention/treatment
Placebo Comparator: Placebo Group
Hip manipulation simulation
Other: Hip manipulation simulation
Hip manipulation simulation

Experimental: Manipulation Group
Hip manipulation
Other: Hip mobilization
High velocity low amplitude hip mobilization of the experimental group




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Muscle strength [ Time Frame: Assessment of muscle strength was performed after 10 minutes of manipulation ]
    A Lafayette dynamometer was used to evaluate the maximum isometric torque of the muscles



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 50 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals with a lower extremity pathology volunteered for this study
  • Being greater than 18 years of age
  • 10% decrease in muscle strength in symptomatic side compared to healthy side
  • Absence of medical precautions that would prevent a maximal effort strength test.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Included individuals with a history lower extremity arthroplasty.
  • Recent muscle or tendon ruptures (within the past 6 months)
  • Unhealed fractures
  • Neurological diseases
  • Malignant cancer
  • Osteoporosis
  • Active infections processes
  • Early postoperative knee, hip and ankle surgery with range of motion and weight bearing restrictions.
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Responsible Party: Diego Galace de Freitas, Principal Investigator, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03115879    
Other Study ID Numbers: DFreitas
First Posted: April 14, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 14, 2017
Last Verified: March 2017

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Muscle Weakness
Muscular Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Neuromuscular Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms