Working...
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Physical Activity Incentives

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03037658
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 31, 2017
Last Update Posted : April 28, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Laura L Carstensen, Stanford University

Brief Summary:
In this study, the investigators will test responsiveness of young, middle-aged, and older adults to a range of incentives, some of which provide rewards for the individual participants and others that offer rewards to other people or groups. The investigators hypothesize that incentives are differentially effective for different age groups.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Physical Activity Other: Offering a financial incentive to increase walking Not Applicable

  Show Detailed Description

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 450 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Physical Activity Incentives
Study Start Date : September 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : March 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Personal - self
Participants had the opportunity to earn money for themselves by increasing their average steps per day.
Other: Offering a financial incentive to increase walking

After a baseline week of walking while wearing a pedometer, participants will be randomly assigned to one of the five conditions. In each of these conditions, participants will have the chance to earn .02/step for each additional step per day (on average across the week, above baseline levels). After a week of incentivized walking, participants will again be asked to wear the pedometer for one final week (with no incentive).

Because the investigators need a week of walking before the incentive week, it is important that participants do not know the specific incentive aspect at the beginning of the study. Therefore, the investigators will not disclose the incentive structure at the beginning of the study. The investigators will debrief participants at the end of the study, and they will be fully informed of the purposes of the study at that time.


Experimental: Prosocial - loved one
Participants had the opportunity to earn money for a loved one of their choice by increasing their average steps per day.
Other: Offering a financial incentive to increase walking

After a baseline week of walking while wearing a pedometer, participants will be randomly assigned to one of the five conditions. In each of these conditions, participants will have the chance to earn .02/step for each additional step per day (on average across the week, above baseline levels). After a week of incentivized walking, participants will again be asked to wear the pedometer for one final week (with no incentive).

Because the investigators need a week of walking before the incentive week, it is important that participants do not know the specific incentive aspect at the beginning of the study. Therefore, the investigators will not disclose the incentive structure at the beginning of the study. The investigators will debrief participants at the end of the study, and they will be fully informed of the purposes of the study at that time.


Experimental: Prosocial - charity
Participants had the opportunity to earn money for a charity of their choice by increasing their average steps per day.
Other: Offering a financial incentive to increase walking

After a baseline week of walking while wearing a pedometer, participants will be randomly assigned to one of the five conditions. In each of these conditions, participants will have the chance to earn .02/step for each additional step per day (on average across the week, above baseline levels). After a week of incentivized walking, participants will again be asked to wear the pedometer for one final week (with no incentive).

Because the investigators need a week of walking before the incentive week, it is important that participants do not know the specific incentive aspect at the beginning of the study. Therefore, the investigators will not disclose the incentive structure at the beginning of the study. The investigators will debrief participants at the end of the study, and they will be fully informed of the purposes of the study at that time.


Experimental: Choice
Participants were given the choice to earn money either for themselves, a loved one, or a charity by increasing their average steps per day.
Other: Offering a financial incentive to increase walking

After a baseline week of walking while wearing a pedometer, participants will be randomly assigned to one of the five conditions. In each of these conditions, participants will have the chance to earn .02/step for each additional step per day (on average across the week, above baseline levels). After a week of incentivized walking, participants will again be asked to wear the pedometer for one final week (with no incentive).

Because the investigators need a week of walking before the incentive week, it is important that participants do not know the specific incentive aspect at the beginning of the study. Therefore, the investigators will not disclose the incentive structure at the beginning of the study. The investigators will debrief participants at the end of the study, and they will be fully informed of the purposes of the study at that time.


No Intervention: Control
Participants were not offered a financial incentive to increase their average steps per day. They simply wore the pedometer for three weeks.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in average steps per day [ Time Frame: Step count is measured via pedometer every day for three weeks ]
    Difference in average steps per day (from baseline week to incentive week)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults aged 18 and older are being targeted. We aim to recruit equal numbers of men and women, but this is not a specific target. There are no racial or ethnic targets.
  • Individuals who pass a phone screening that includes physical (PAR-Q) and cognitive (MMSE) measures are eligible for this study. These individuals must either answer "no" to all the questions on the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) or receive verbal permission from their doctor. Additionally, they must also show no signs of cognitive impairment as indicated by scores greater than or equal to 23 points on the 26-point Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • We will not recruit minors (17 or younger) because this is a study of adult development.
  • Individuals who answered "yes" on any questions of the PAR-Q and/or received a score less than or equal to 22 on the MMSE.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03037658


Locations
Layout table for location information
United States, California
Life-span Development Lab
Stanford, California, United States, 94305
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stanford University
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Laura L Carstensen, PhD Stanford University

Publications:
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Laura L Carstensen, Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy, Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03037658     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB-28280
First Posted: January 31, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 28, 2017
Last Verified: April 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: The researchers will share de-identified participant data with other researchers.

Layout table for additional information
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Laura L Carstensen, Stanford University:
physical activity
walking
incentive
step count