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"The Healthy Body Image" (HBI) Program: A Program to Promote a Positive Body Image

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02901457
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 15, 2016
Last Update Posted : February 26, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
The Norwegian Women´s Public Health Association
Norwegian Extra Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation
University of Tromso
University College of Southeast Norway
University of Agder
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Professor Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences

Brief Summary:

Too many Norwegian adolescents experience severe body dissatisfaction (40-70 %), and strive to accomplish the "perfect body". At the same time, only 50 % meet the government`s recommendations on physical activity and intake of fruits and vegetables. Also, 14-24 % has unhealthy sleeping habits. Optimizing these lifestyle factors is associated with physical and psychological health. These factors, along with the pressure to obtain the "perfect" body, are threatening the adolescent`s physical and psychological health, jfr. Meld St nr 19. It is now a need for knowledge on how the investigators can contribute to promote positive body experience among the adolescents.

It has recently, through a controlled study on elite youth athletes at Norwegian sports high schools, been shown that it is possible to change eating habits, improve body image and reduce new cases of eating disorder. It is now desirable to test an adapted program through a school-based program at regular Norwegian high school students (12th grade). Today, no controlled, school-based intervention studies with long-term follow-up have been conducted.

The main aim of this project is to investigate if it is possible, through a school-based intervention program (Healthy Body Intervention), to promote positive body image, increase physical activity level, and healthy eating and sleeping habits in both boys and girls at Norwegian high schools.

The intervention program will contribute with new evidence-based knowledge on the effect of an adapted health-promoting program.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Quality of Life Eating Behaviors Physical Activity Other: The "Healthy Body Image" intervention Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
The design is a school-based randomized controlled trial (RCT) intervention, using the methods questionnaire and interview to obtain data. Based on statistical power analyses, all high schools in Oslo and Akershus County will be asked to participate in the study. After the schools have responded, consenting schools will be stratified (by size and geographical affiliation) and randomized to the intervention or the control condition. To minimize contamination biases within schools, the investigators prepare a cluster-randomized design.The population should contain 17-20 schools (1400 students at 2nd year). Data collection is conducted through pre-test and post-test 1, 2, and 3 (acute, 3, and 12 month post-intervention). At post-test 1, a selection is invited to participate in an interview about feasibility in addition to the questionnaire. It is an intervention for students containing interactive lecturers with discussion, team work, discussions and home assignments.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 4193 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: "The Healthy Body Image" (HBI) Program: A Program to Promote a Positive Body Image. A School-based Randomized Controlled Trial
Study Start Date : August 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2018
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2018

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Healthy Body Image
Students receive the Healthy Body Image intervention containing 3x90 minutes of interactive workshops with the addition of related homework after each workshop.
Other: The "Healthy Body Image" intervention
Interactive workshops (3 x 90 minutes) include training techniques to increase media literacy, enhance self-esteem, positive body image, awareness of perfectionism, and include discussions related to truths and myths related to life style factors. Homework is an extension of each workshop that is simple and not time-consuming tasks to increase reflection and awareness of how all the mentioned factors are a part of their lives.
Other Name: Healthy Body Image

No Intervention: Control group
Students do not receive the intervention program.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Proximal and distal effect of the "Healthy Body Intervention" (HBI) program on change in positive body image [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    Participants are asked to respond to questions by choosing from different responses presented on a likert scale. Positive body image is assessed by the Experience of Embodiment Scale.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Proximal and distal effect of the HBI program on change in self-esteem [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    Participants are asked to respond to questions by choosing from different responses presented on a likert scale. The scale used is the Rosenberg Self-esteem scale.

  2. Proximal and distal effect of the "Healthy Body Intervention" (HBI) program on change in the prevalence of students meeting the recommendations for health promoting physical activity. [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    The outcome will be measured through a self-developed Physical Activity level/habit questionnaire, including choosing a specific response on a likert scale and response through open ended questions.

  3. Experience of the intervention program and the feasibility of running the HBI program in schools. [ Time Frame: Post-test is planned within first week after intervention ]
    To measure the outcome, a self-developed interview guide in addition to a self-developed questionnaire asking students and school staff about the experience of the intervention program and the feasibility of the intervention. When answering the questionnaire, participants are asked to respond by choosing a response on a likert scale.

  4. Proximal and distal effect of the HBI program on change in eating behavior (nutrition intake [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    The outcome will be measured through a self-developed Food frequency questionnaire where responses are chosen from a likert scale.

  5. Proximal and distal effect of the HBI program on change in sleeping quality and sleep patterns [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    The outcome is measured through The Bergen Insomnia Scale, 6 items and 3 items assessing delayed sleep phase and by asking the participants (using a likert scale) how many hours of sleep they usually get per night during a normal weekday and a weekend day.

  6. Proximal and distal effect of the HBI program on change in academic achievements [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questions included in the questionnaire package at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    Participants are asked to choose the correct grade they received on their last report card, from a scale presenting the possible grades.

  7. Proximal and distal effect of the "Healthy Body Intervention" (HBI) program on change in health related quality of life [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire containing all the below presented measures at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    Participants are asked to respond to questions by choosing from different responses presented on a likert scale. Health related quality of life will be assessed through the "Screening for and Promotion of Health Related Quality of Life in Children an Adolescents - a European Public Health Perspective - 10" (KIDSKREEN-10).

  8. Proximal and distal effect of the HBI program on change in symptoms of eating disorders [ Time Frame: Participants are asked to complete the questionnaire at post-tests planned at week 1, 3 months and 12 months after intervention ]
    Symptoms of eating disorders is assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire - 11 (EDE-Q 11)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years to 19 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Norwegian high schools
  • High schools located in either Oslo or Akershus County
  • Students in the 2nd grade fall 2016
  • Students within academic specialization education programs
  • Teachers teaching included students in Norwegian, Social studies, Physical education, and contact teachers
  • School nurses working at the randomly selected schools
  • School administrators at randomly selected schools

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Schools that follow foreign school systems
  • Students within vocational education programs
  • School departments connected to prison

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02901457


Locations
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Norway
Norwegian School of Sports Sciences
Oslo, Norway, 0806
Sponsors and Collaborators
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences
The Norwegian Women´s Public Health Association
Norwegian Extra Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation
University of Tromso
University College of Southeast Norway
University of Agder
Investigators
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Study Chair: Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Phd Norwegain School of Sports Sciences

Publications:
Rosenberg M. Society and the Adolescent Self-Image. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press; 1965.
Sandoz EK, Wilson, K.G., Merwin, R.M., Kellum, K.K. Assessment of body imageflexibility: The Body Image-Acceptance and Action Questionnaire. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science. 2013:39-48
Smolak L, & Piran, N. . Gender and the prevention of eating disorders. In: G. McVey MPL, N. Piran & H. B. Ferguson editor. Preventing eating-related and weight-related disorders: Collaborative research, advocacy, and policy change. Waterloo, ON: Wilfred Laurier Press; 2012. p. 201-24.

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Professor Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Professor, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02901457    
Other Study ID Numbers: JCSB
First Posted: September 15, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 26, 2018
Last Verified: February 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Keywords provided by Professor Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences:
Body Image