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Brain Bases of Natural Scenes's Visual Perception of Natural Scenes (SCENES)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02840305
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 21, 2016
Last Update Posted : January 18, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital, Grenoble

Brief Summary:

Using the available data from psychophysics, cellular electrophysiology and functionnal neuroanatomy of visual pathway, current models of visual recognition suppose that the perception of scenes start with a parallel extraction of differents elementary visual characteristics to different spatial frequencies according to a default processing principle named : 'coarse-to-fine'.

According to this principle, the visual scene's analysis would be decomposed in two steps. Fisrt, the fast analysis of the global information borne by low frequency of the scene will provide an overview of the scene's structure and would enable a first perceptive categorisation which would be then refined, approved or denied by the latest analysis of the most local, detailed and precise information, carried by the very high spatial frequency of the scene.

The research carried out since several years is preparing a biologically plausible model and to find brain bases by different imaging techniques among healthy subjects but also patients with a brain lesion and patients with a peripheral lesion.

The main goal of this Magnetic Resonance Imaging study is to find brain bases of natural scenes's visual perception of the natural scenes.

Three studies in Magnetic Resonance Imaging will be conducted, during which subjects will have to categorize pictures of natural scenes filtered in spatial frequencies. The outcome of this study will allow to refine models of visual recognition, most of them based on analysis of spatial frequencies.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Healthy Volunteer Other: Evaluation of visual function Other: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 141 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Official Title: Brain Bases of Visual Perceptionnatural Scenes of Natural Scenes.
Study Start Date : April 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : August 2016

Arm Intervention/treatment
Expérience 1
Brain bases of spatial frequencies treatment 30 young adults, 20 old adults 20 children between 4 and 6 years, 20 children between 6 and 12 years and 20 young adults
Other: Evaluation of visual function
Other: Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Other Name: MRI

Expérience 2
Brain bases of Computer to Film (CtF) analysis 30 young adults, 20 old adults
Other: Evaluation of visual function
Other: Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Other Name: MRI

Expérience 3
Part of parahippocampal gyrus in Computer to Film (CtF) analysis 30 young adults, 20 old adults.
Other: Evaluation of visual function
Other: Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Other Name: MRI




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Identify brain bases of natural scenes's visual perception of the natural scenes [ Time Frame: About 80 minutes ]

    Evaluation 1 = Visual tasks Experience 1 : Brain bases of spatial frequencies treatment Experience 2 : Brain bases of Computer to Film (CtF) natural scenes analysis MRI exam Experience 3 : Part of parahippocampal gyrus in Computer to Film (CtF) natural scenes analysis MRI exam About 30 minutes

    Evaluation 2 = Retinotopy : only adults that have shown activations inside occipital cortex during evaluation 1 MRI exam about 50 minutes




Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   4 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for young adults :

  • Subjet over 18 years and less than 30 years
  • Affiliation to a social security
  • Free signed consent
  • Medical exam done before participation to the study
  • Normal or corrected visual acuity

Exclusion Criteria four young adults :

  • Counter-argument to MRI
  • Pregnant, breast-feeding or parturient women
  • Adults non protected or unable to express their consent
  • Adults protected
  • Important earing or visual disorder
  • Neuropsychiatric disorder current or past passée ou présente (exept benign epilepsy)
  • Severe affection on a general level (cardiac, respiratory, hematologic, renal, hépatic, cancerous)
  • Drug treatment in progress (exept anti-epileptic drug) likely to de modulate brain activity

Inclusion Criteria for old adults :

  • Subjet over 50 years
  • Affiliation to a social security
  • Free signed consent
  • Medical exam done before participation to the study
  • Normal or corrected visual acuity

Exclusion Criteria four old adults :

  • Counter-argument to MRI
  • Pregnant, breast-feeding or parturient women
  • Adults non protected or unable to express their consent
  • Adults protected
  • Important earing or visual disorder
  • Neuropsychiatric disorder current or past passée ou présente (exept benign epilepsy)
  • Severe affection on a general level (cardiac, respiratory, hematologic, renal, hépatic, cancerous)
  • Drug treatment in progress (exept anti-epileptic drug) likely to de modulate brain activity

Inclusion Criteria for children :

  • Children between 4 and 12 years
  • Affiliation to a social security
  • Free signed consent
  • Medical exam done before participation to the study
  • Normal or corrected visual acuity

Exclusion Criteria four children :

  • Counter-argument to MRI
  • Important earing or visual disorder
  • Important development disorder and/or acquisitions identified by parents and/or school teachers
  • Neuropsychiatric disorder current or past passée ou présente (exept benign epilepsy)
  • Severe affection on a general level (cardiac, respiratory, hematologic, renal, hépatic, cancerous)
  • Drug treatment in progress (exept anti-epileptic drug) likely to de modulate brain activity

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02840305


Locations
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France
UniversityHospitalGrenoble
La Tronche, France, 38700
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Grenoble
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Alexandre Krainik, Professor Grenoble Hospital University
Publications:
Guérin-Dugué, A., & Oliva, A. (1999). Natural images classification from distributions of local dominant orientations, 11th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis SCIA'99.
Guérin-Dugué, A., & Oliva, A. (2000). Classification of scene photographs from local orientations features. Pattern Recognition Letters, 21, 1135-1140.
Hérault, J., Oliva, A., & Guérin-Dugué, A. (1997). Scene categorisation by curvilinear component analysis of low frequency spectra. Paper presented at the IANN'97, Bruges
Monoyer, F. (1875). Echelle typographique pour la détermination de l'acuité visuelle. (Acad. des Sciences, Comptes rendus). Gaz. Méd. De Paris, 80, 113.
Navon, D. (1977). Forest before trees: the precedence of global features in visual perception. Cognitive Psychology, 9, 353-383.
Oliva, A. (1995). Perception de scènes: Traitement fréquentiel du signal visuel aspects psychophysiques et neurophysiologiques. Institut National Polytechnique, Grenoble.
Pelli, D. G., Robson, J. G., & Wilkins, A. J. (1988). The design of a new letter chart for measuring contrast sensitivity. Clinical Vision Sciences, 2(3), 187-199.
Schyns, P. G., & Oliva, A. (1994). From blobs to boundary edges: Evidence for time- and spatial-scale-dependant scene recognition. American Psychological Society, 5, 195-200.
Van Essen, D. C., & DeYoe, E. A. (1995). Concurrent processing in the primate visual cortex. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The cognitive Neurosciences (pp. 383-400). Cambridge: Bradford Book.

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Responsible Party: University Hospital, Grenoble
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02840305    
Other Study ID Numbers: 38RC11.221
First Posted: July 21, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 18, 2017
Last Verified: January 2017
Keywords provided by University Hospital, Grenoble:
Natural scenes
Brain bases
Visual perception
MRI