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Active Class Space Metabolic Benefits Study (ACS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02831309
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 13, 2016
Last Update Posted : July 13, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rebecca Hasson, University of Michigan

Brief Summary:
ACS examined the potential influence of intermittent physical activity breaks of various intensities (control, light, moderate, vigorous) on measures of immediate mental performance, mood, hunger and several metabolic outcomes in children aged 7-11 years. We build upon previous work to hypothesize that higher-intensity intermittent physical activity breaks throughout an 8-hour day will improve immediate mental performance, mood, and post-exercise physical activity levels, while reducing hunger and post-exercise food intake.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Childhood Obesity Behavioral: Light-Intensity Condition Behavioral: Moderate-Intensity Condition Behavioral: High-Intensity Condition Behavioral: Sedentary Condition Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Background: A range of metabolic, behavioral, mental and physical health benefits of regular physical activity have been documented in adults and children in the long-term. Yet, relatively little is known about how children's usual daily physical activity patterns (i.e. small bursts throughout the day) affect acute (immediately post-activity) and short-term (72 hours post-activity) metabolic and psychosocial outcomes. Additionally, little is known how this specific pattern of physical activity affects subsequent physical activity levels (i.e. compensatory behavior) and subsequent dietary intake, over the short-term- information critical to designing effective interventions involving the physical environment of the school classroom. Overall Goal: Active Class Space (ACS) will examine the potential influence of intermittent physical activity breaks of various intensities (control, light, moderate, vigorous) on measures of immediate mental performance, mood, hunger and several metabolic outcomes in children aged 7-11 years. We build upon previous work to hypothesize that higher-intensity intermittent physical activity breaks throughout an 8-hour day will improve immediate mental performance, mood, and post-exercise physical activity levels, while reducing hunger and post-exercise food intake. Specific Aims: (1) To determine the effects of intermittent physical activity breaks of varying intensities on immediate mental performance, hunger and satiety; (2) To determine the effects of intermittent activity breaks of varying intensities on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), perceived exercise enjoyment, in-task mood, post-exercise food intake and post-exercise physical activity levels; and (3) To examine gender differences in the preceding variables in response to low-, moderate, and high-intensity intermittent physical activity. Design: Eighteen healthy males and twenty-one healthy females between the ages of 7-11 years completed completed four experimental conditions in random order: (1) 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, light--intensity activity breaks performed at 25% of heart rate reserve (HRR) every 18 minutes; (2) 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, moderate--intensity activity breaks (50% HRR); (3) 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, high--intensity activity breaks (75% HRR); and (4) 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2 minutes of sedentary screen time. Standardized meals will be provided during each experimental condition. Dietary intake and physical activity levels were monitored for the remainder of the experimental day and over the subsequent three days for each condition. Dependent Variables: Major outcome variables include: Energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry and heart rate; dietary intake measured using a 3-day dietary record; physical activity measured by accelerometry; immediate mental performance assessed using a 90-sec mathematical computation test; hunger and satiety assessed using a visual analog scale; RPE assessed using the Borg scale; perceived exercise enjoyment assessed using the physical activity enjoyment scale (PACES); in-task mood assessed using the Feeling Scale (FS) and Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale (SEES). Data Analysis: A linear mixed model will be fitted for each outcome variable with effects for condition, sex, BMI, and baseline physical activity level. A Bonferroni correction will be used to adjust for multiple comparisons in post hoc tests following the mixed-effect model. A similar linear mixed-model for raw levels of each outcome variable over time will also be fitted to assess temporal differences between conditions. This model will include effects for condition, time, time-by-condition interaction, sex, BMI, and baseline physical activity levels. Significance: ACS will shed new light on the short-term metabolic, behavioral, mental and physical health benefits of intermittent physical activity breaks in children. The results from this study will inform the design of behavioral and environmental interventions to promote physical activity and cognitive development in pediatric populations.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 39 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Active Class Space Metabolic Benefits Study
Study Start Date : June 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : August 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : August 2015

Arm Intervention/treatment
Sham Comparator: Sedentary Condition
Forty minutes of screen time. Standardized meals provided.
Behavioral: Sedentary Condition
The sedentary condition consisted of 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2-minutes of screen time every 18 minutes. Standardized meals were provided.

Active Comparator: Light-Intensity Condition
Forty minutes of light-intensity activity. Standardized meals provided.
Behavioral: Light-Intensity Condition
The light-intensity condition consisted of 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, light--intensity activity breaks performed at 25% of heart rate reserve (HRR) every 18 minutes. Standardized meals were provided.

Active Comparator: Moderate-Intensity Condition
Forty minutes of moderate-intensity activity. Standardized meals provided.
Behavioral: Moderate-Intensity Condition
The moderate-intensity condition consisted of 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, moderate-intensity activity breaks performed at 50% of heart rate reserve (HRR) every 18 minutes. Standardized meals were provided.

Active Comparator: High-Intensity Condition
Forty minutes of high-intensity activity. Standardized meals provided.
Behavioral: High-Intensity Condition
The high-intensity condition consisted of 8 hours of sitting interrupted with 2--minute, vigorous-intensity activity breaks performed at 75% of heart rate reserve (HRR) every 18 minutes. Standardized meals were provided.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Physical activity energy expenditure [ Time Frame: 4 days ]
    Physical activity energy expenditure throughout the condition day and over the next three days. Participants wore an accelerometer for four days. Energy expenditure was calculated from accelerometer data.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. 40-item immediate mental performance math test [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Number of math questions answered correctly within 90 seconds in the morning (800hr), midday (1200hr) and afternoon (1600hr). Scores were marked as number correct out of 40.

  2. Dietary intake [ Time Frame: 4 days ]
    Standardized meals were provided in the morning, midday and evening and 3-day dietary records were collected three days post-condition day. Total daily dietary intake was calculated from food consumed in the lab and at home.

  3. Physical activity minutes [ Time Frame: 4 days ]
    Physical activity minutes throughout the condition day and over the next three days. Participants wore an accelerometer for four days. Minutes participating in physical activity was calculated using accelerometer data.

  4. 4-item hunger and satiety visual analog scale [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Self reported hunger and satiety in the morning (800hr), midday (1200hr) and afternoon (1600hr). Scores were calculated from a visual analog scale ranging from 0-100 (0= hungry; 0=full), yielding a total between 0- 400

  5. Single-item ratings of perceived exertion [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Perceived exertion during 20, 2-minute activity or sedentary breaks. This single item questionnaire is scored 6-20 (6 = light exertion; 20 maximal exertion).

  6. Single-item feeling scale [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Participants self-reported how they felt during each 20, 2-minute activity or sedentary breaks. This single item questionnaire is scored -5 to +5 (-5 = very bad; +5 = very good).

  7. 16-item exercise enjoyment measure [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Self-reported mood in the morning (800hr), midday (1200hr) and afternoon (1600hr). The scale is a combination of 16 positive and negative statements. The responses were scored on a 5-point Likert like scale (1= disagree a lot, 5 = agree a lot). Seven of the 16 statements were reverse scored.

  8. 12-item psychological mood measure [ Time Frame: 1 day ]
    Self-reported mood at midday (1200hr) and afternoon (1600hr). A 3 dimensional, 12-item scale designed to measure changes in 3 categories; positive well-being (e.g., i feel terrific), psychological distress (e.g., i feel miserable), and fatigue (e.g., i feel exhausted). For each item participants will be asked to indicate how strongly they are experiencing the feeling state at that time. Items will be scored on a 7-point Likert scale (1 = "not at all," 7 = "very much so"). Each subscale ranges from 4 to 28 with higher scores representing greater fatigue, positive well-being or psychological distress.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   7 Years to 11 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Children ages 7-11 years old from the greater Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti areas were recruited to participate in this study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants were excluded based on the following criteria: (1) were taking medications or were diagnosed with diseases that could influence exercise ability or cognitive function and (2) were previously diagnosed with any major illness/health condition since birth.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02831309


Locations
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United States, Michigan
Childhood Disparities Research Laboratory
Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, 48109
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Michigan
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Rebecca E Hasson, PhD University of Michigan

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Rebecca Hasson, Assistant Professor, University of Michigan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02831309    
Other Study ID Numbers: HUM00084540
First Posted: July 13, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 13, 2016
Last Verified: July 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Rebecca Hasson, University of Michigan:
physical activity
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Pediatric Obesity
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms