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Evaluation of a Mass Media Family Planning Campaign on the Uptake of Contraceptive Methods in Burkina Faso

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02714686
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified August 2016 by Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab.
Recruitment status was:  Active, not recruiting
First Posted : March 21, 2016
Last Update Posted : September 2, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Innovations for Poverty Action
Development Media International
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab

Brief Summary:

In this experiment, the investigators will study the effect of a mass media family planning campaign on contraception related behavior. The study takes place in Burkina Faso, a country with an average of six children born to each woman, and a modern contraceptive prevalence rate (mCPR) estimated at 15% in 2010 at the national level, as per the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) 2010 report on Burkina Faso.

The aim of this study is to provide robust evidence on the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of an intense three-year mass media campaign focused on family planning. The campaign will diffuse messages about the financial and health benefits of family planning, and information on the different types, sources, advantages, and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods. The study will target women at the age of reproduction in rural areas of Burkina Faso to measure the effect of the intervention on total and modern contraceptive prevalence rates, perceptions of family planning, contraception-related behavior, and general gender norms.

Burkina Faso is an ideal place to evaluate the impact of a radio campaign because a high percentage of the rural population listens to local radio which is in the local language. Radio station areas are distinct because they target very local languages and their reach is limited by government decree, which allows for the implementation of a randomized control trial.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Contraception Family Characteristics Family Size, Desired Behavioral: Radio Mass Media Family Planning Campaign Not Applicable

Show Show detailed description

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 7515 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Evaluation of a Mass Media Family Planning Campaign on the Uptake of Contraceptive Methods in Burkina Faso
Study Start Date : April 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : May 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Birth Control

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Radio Mass Media Family Planning Campaign
Clusters receive a three-year mass media campaign on family planning in an attempt to reduce cognitive barriers to contraception
Behavioral: Radio Mass Media Family Planning Campaign
Short daily spots, weekly interactive shows, testimonies, and interviews with experts and community leaders on contraception and family planning

No Intervention: Control group



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Total Contraception Prevalence Rate [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]

    The percentage of women using, or whose partner is using, an effective contraceptive method out of all women at the age of reproduction in the sample ("effective" method includes all modern methods, but also some effective traditional methods, such as withdrawal)

    The investigators will look at heterogeneous treatment effects by availability of supply and by access and listenership to the radio.


  2. Change in Modern Contraception Prevalence Rate [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]

    The percentage of women using, or whose partner is using, a modern contraceptive method out of all women at the age of reproduction in the sample.

    The investigators will look at heterogeneous treatment effects by availability of supply and by access and listenership to the radio.

    All secondary outcomes listed below will eventually be analyzed only if the variables had sufficient variance.



Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percentage of women intending to use contraception in the future [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
  2. Percentage of women seeking family planning advice [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
  3. Percentage of women discussing family planning with their partners and others [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
  4. Percentage of women who are fecund and sexually active but do not want to become pregnant but are not currently using contraception [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
  5. Average time lapse between pregnancies [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    Limited power to test this outcome and find significant effects

  6. Number of unwanted pregnancies [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    Limited power to test this outcome and find significant effects

  7. Number of births per 1,000 women of reproductive age (if accurate population level data on total births in communities become available) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    Limited power to test this outcome and find significant effects

  8. Number of family planning products delivered throughout the study period (from administrative data, if available) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
  9. Mean effects on survey questions relating to knowledge of contraceptive methods [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    Variables include: knowledge of the existence, price, source, advantages, and disadvantages of different methods, including rejection of misconceptions such as contraception causing sterility or sickness

  10. Mean effects on survey questions relating to attitudes towards contraception [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women who think that it is embarrassing to buy a contraceptive method
    • Percentage of women who think that using contraceptive methods is a sign of not trusting their partner

  11. Mean effects on survey questions relating to knowledge of family planning [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women who know benefits of spacing births
    • Percentage of women who know benefits of delaying the age of marriage for young girls

  12. Mean effects on survey questions relating to attitudes towards family planning [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women who think it is acceptable to talk about family planning in public (radio, schools, posters, etc.)
    • Percentage of women who think that a woman should be able to control the number of children she has during her lifetime

  13. Mean effects on survey questions relating to women's perceptions of fertility and birth spacing [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Women's perception on the ideal age at first birth (in standard deviation units from the control group)
    • Women's perception on the ideal time lapse between first and second birth (in standard deviation units from the control group)
    • Women's perception on the ideal number of children in total (in standard deviation units from the control group)

  14. Mean effects on survey questions relating to partners' perceptions of fertility and birth spacing (as reported by women) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Partners' perception on the ideal time lapse between first and second birth (in standard deviation units from the control group)
    • Partners' perception on the ideal number of children in total (in standard deviation units from the control group)

  15. Mean effects on survey questions relating to perceptions on gender norms [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women who think that it is better to be a man than a woman
    • Percentage of women who think that boys should have better access to resources in education
    • Percentage of women who think that men must be more educated than their wives
    • Percentage of women who think that men should have better access to consumption of meat and imported products

  16. Mean effects on survey questions relating to behavior reflecting women empowerment [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women working or participating in a productive activity
    • Percentage of women participating in decision-making when it comes to different household expenditures

  17. Mean effects on survey questions relating to women's subjective health and wellbeing [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women satisfied with their lives
    • Percentage of women considering themselves healthy compared to other women their age in the village
    • Percentage of women considering themselves happy compared to other women their age in the village

  18. Mean effects on survey questions relating to domestic violence and sexual harassment [ Time Frame: Baseline and 3 years ]
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families get jealous when they walk to other men
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families don't allow them to see their female friends
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families insist on knowing where they are in the village at any time of the day
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families ever threatened to harm them or their families
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families ever destroyed their personal objects
    • Percentage of women whose husbands / husbands' families ever physically hurt them



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years to 49 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Inclusion in our study of radio station clusters on which treatment will be randomized is based on the following criteria:

  • The cluster has at least one local radio station with adequate Frequency Modulation (FM) rays to cover the zone
  • Different radio stations' coverage areas do not overlap with each other

The criteria for village selection is the following:

  • Villages must have less than 1,500 inhabitants as per the 2006 Burkina Faso census, except in a couple of radio station clusters where villages sampled had up to 4,200 inhabitants due to the low number of small villages in them.
  • The radio stations through which the campaign will be diffused, being in semi-urban or urban locations, we only include villages that are more than 5 km away from these stations
  • We only consider villages with limited access to electricity
  • We only consider villages less than 10 km away from a clinic as per available estimates (Geographic Institute of Burkina Faso and village chiefs)

Individual level criteria:

  • We only survey women at the age of reproduction, i.e. between 15 and 49 years of age as measured by the listing

Exclusion criteria:

  • No particular exclusion criteria when the inclusion criteria listed above are met.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02714686


Locations
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Burkina Faso
Innovations for Poverty Action
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Sponsors and Collaborators
Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab
Innovations for Poverty Action
Development Media International
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Rachel Glennerster, PhD Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab
Principal Investigator: Joanna Murray, PhD Development Media International
Principal Investigator: Victor Pouliquen, M.A. Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab
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Responsible Party: Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02714686    
Other Study ID Numbers: IPA-10535AA
First Posted: March 21, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 2, 2016
Last Verified: August 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: After completion of the evaluation and publication of the study, anticipated in 2021, a de-identified version of the database will be made available to a broader audience for further academic or policy oriented studies. The datasets will contain all information collected from the surveys at baseline and endline, except for personal identifiers which will be removed to protect the identity of participants.
Keywords provided by Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab:
Fertility
Total Contraception Prevalence Rate
Family planning methods
Birth Control
Mass Media Campaign
Demand for contraception
Modern Contraception Prevalence Rate
Birth intervals