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The Role of an Attention Demanding Activity for Priming Motor Learning

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02714647
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 21, 2016
Last Update Posted : June 23, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christopher Walter, University of Utah

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to determine if priming attention prior to practicing a motor task will have an effect on the ability to acquire and learn that motor task. The investigators hypothesize that the acquisition and learning of a motor task will improve if attention is primed prior to practicing that motor task when compared to a group who does not receive the prime.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Basic Motor Learning Problem Behavioral: Attentional prime Behavioral: Sham prime Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 30 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: The Role of an Attention Demanding Activity for Priming Motor Learning
Study Start Date : March 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 26, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2017

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Experimental
This group will perform the attention demanding activity (a variant of the Simon Task) with a focus on accuracy over speed prior to practicing the motor task. Participants will also have extended deadlines (750 ms) throughout the task to ensure an accuracy preference. Participants will then perform 50 trials of the simulated feeding task where they will spoon two raw kidney beans at a time from a center proximal "start" cup to three distal "target" cups positioned 16 cm away at 45°, 90°, and 135° around the start cup as fast as possible using the non-dominant hand. Spooning two beans between the start cup and a target cup is considered one repetition where each trial will consist of 15 repetitions.
Behavioral: Attentional prime
Sham Comparator: Control
This group will perform the attention demanding activity (a variant of the Simon Task) with a focus on speed over accuracy prior to practicing the motor task. Participants will also have short deadlines (250 ms) throughout the task to ensure a speed preference. Participants will then perform 50 trials of the simulated feeding task where they will spoon two raw kidney beans at a time from a center proximal "start" cup to three distal "target" cups positioned 16 cm away at 45°, 90°, and 135° around the start cup as fast as possible using the non-dominant hand. Spooning two beans between the start cup and a target cup is considered one repetition where each trial will consist of 15 repetitions.
Behavioral: Sham prime



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline performance time (trial time) on the simulated feeding task at the end of training [ Time Frame: Day one ]
    Average trial time on the simulated feeding task at the end of training compared to trial time on the simulated feeding task at baseline.

  2. Change from baseline performance time (trial time) on the simulated feeding task at one-day retention [ Time Frame: Day two ]
    Average trial time of two trials on the simulated feeding task on day two compared to trial time on the simulated feeding task at baseline.

  3. Change from baseline performance time (trial time) on the simulated feeding task at eight-day retention [ Time Frame: Day eight ]
    Average trial time of two trials on the simulated feeding task on day eight compared to trial time on the simulated feeding task at baseline.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline in performance time (trial time) on the untrained similar transfer task (card sorting task) at the end of training [ Time Frame: Day one ]
    Average trial time on the card sorting task after training on the simulated feeding task compared to trial time on the card sorting task at baseline.

  2. Change from baseline in performance time (trial time) on the untrained similar transfer task (card sorting task) at day eight [ Time Frame: Day eight ]
    Average trial time on the card sorting task performed on day eight compared to trial time on the card sorting task at baseline.

  3. Change from baseline in performance time (trial time) on the untrained dissimilar transfer task (buttoning task) at the end of training [ Time Frame: Day one ]
    Average trial time on the buttoning task after training on the simulated feeding task compared to trial time on the buttoning task at baseline.

  4. Change from baseline in performance time (trial time) on the untrained dissimilar transfer task (buttoning task) at day eight [ Time Frame: Day eight ]
    Average trial time on the buttoning task performed on day eight compared to trial time on the buttoning task at baseline.

  5. Rate of improvement [ Time Frame: trial time (in seconds) during practice (day 1) will be plotted as a function of trial number (1-50) ]
    Rate of improvement (c) will be modeled using an exponential decay function: y=a + be (exp[-x/c]), where a is the final trial time value that the exponential decay function approaches (i.e. asymptote), b is the scale of the learning from the first trial time to the value a, x is the trial number, 1/c is the number of trials needed to obtain asymptote (i.e. 1-e-1).

  6. Priming measures [ Time Frame: when performed during the priming/sham priming activities on day one ]
    accuracy (% correct) and reaction time ( in ms). This will allow us to ensure that the participant's have completed the task according to the directions.

  7. Level of arousal [ Time Frame: Day one ]
    using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale to ensure that the motor improvement is not due to level of arousal.

  8. Level of arousal [ Time Frame: Day two ]
    using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale to ensure that the motor improvement is not due to level of arousal.

  9. Level of arousal [ Time Frame: Day eight ]
    using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale to ensure that the motor improvement is not due to level of arousal.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Between the ages of 18-35

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Present with acute medical problems or orthopedic injuries that would limit participation in the motor task
  • Uncorrected vision loss
  • Has a neurological disease
  • Consider themselves ambidextrous

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02714647


Locations
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United States, Utah
University of Utah College of Health; Division of Occupational Therapy
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, 84108
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Utah
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Responsible Party: Christopher Walter, Graduate Student, University of Utah
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02714647    
Other Study ID Numbers: 82401
First Posted: March 21, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 23, 2017
Last Verified: June 2017
Keywords provided by Christopher Walter, University of Utah:
motor learning
attention
priming
rehabilitation