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CD36 and Human Fat Taste Perception (FATYP)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02699567
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 4, 2016
Last Update Posted : March 4, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Monell Chemical Senses Center
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marta Yanina Pepino de Gruev, Washington University School of Medicine

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of common human variants in in taste related genes, such as CD36 gene, a putative fat taste receptor, affect fat taste perception.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Obesity Other: No intervention

Detailed Description:
At present, the general agreement is that humans perceive five taste qualities: sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami (the savory, meaty taste of some amino acids). It is believed that these qualities evolved to help us find nutrients (e.g. sweets, umami signaled calories) and avoid potential harmful substances (e.g. bitter signalized poison). Despite the fact that some fats, which can only be obtained through the diet, are essential for life, fat is not considered a basic taste; and, the issue of how fats are precisely sensed is unresolved. However, increasing evidence suggests that, in addition to smell and texture, taste plays an important role in fat perception. Putative fat taste receptor classes have been identified in animal models. One such receptor is the glycoprotein CD36, previously documented to be involved in trafficking and storage of fat. CD36 was recently found in rodents' and humans' taste buds. In rodents, CD36 deletion blunts specifically fat recognition. Although CD36 variants are frequent in humans, its role in humans' fat taste perception and preferences remains incompletely understood and will be the focus of the current proposal. The main goal of this study is to determine the effect of a common human variant in the CD36 gene on fat taste perception by using standardized sensory evaluation techniques. In addition, we will examine whether common variants in taste related genes (other than CD36) are associated with individual differences in the perception of flavors of milkshakes prepared with different amounts of fats.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 97 participants
Observational Model: Case-Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: CD36 Involvement on Fat Taste Perception and Fat Hedonic Value in Humans
Study Start Date : November 2011
Actual Primary Completion Date : April 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Lean AA
Subjects with a BMI<=25 kg/m2 and carriers of a CD36 gene variation associated with low CD36 expression levels
Other: No intervention
Obese AA
Subjects with a BMI>29.9 kg/m2 and carriers of a CD36 gene variation associated with low CD36 expression levels
Other: No intervention
Lean GG
Subjects with a BMI<=25 kg/m2 and carriers of a CD36 gene variation associated with high CD36 expression levels
Other: No intervention
Obese GG
Subjects with a BMI>29.9 kg/m2 and carriers of a CD36 gene variation associated with high CD36 expression levels
Other: No intervention



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Scores in the general labeled magnitude scale for fat flavor intensity [ Time Frame: One to 12 weeks following screening ]
  2. Scores in the hedonic general labeled magnitude scale for fat flavor hedonic value [ Time Frame: One to 12 weeks following screening ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of participants who are PROP taster as assessed by sip and spit testing procedure of water with increasing PROP concentrations. [ Time Frame: One to 12 weeks following screening ]

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA
Extracted genomic DNA


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 50 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Subjects will be men and women, 21 to 50 yrs of age of all races and ethnic groups. The two groups (i.e. groups with different CD36 genetic variants) will be matched as closely as possible in age, sex, body mass index and race distributions. Subject population will consist of lean subjects (BMI >18-<25 kg/m2) and subjects with obesity (BMI >29.9 kg/m2).
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI >18-<25 kg/m2 or BMI>29.9 kg/m2.
  • 21 to 50 years of age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Previous malabsorptive or restrictive gastrointestinal surgery
  • Smoking
  • Pregnancy or breastfeeding
  • Diabetes
  • Taking medication that might affect taste perception

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02699567


Locations
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United States, Missouri
Washington University School of Medicine
Saint Louis, Missouri, United States, 63110
Sponsors and Collaborators
Washington University School of Medicine
Monell Chemical Senses Center
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Marta Y Pepino de Gruev, PhD Washington University School of Medicine
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Responsible Party: Marta Yanina Pepino de Gruev, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02699567    
Other Study ID Numbers: 201011853
First Posted: March 4, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2016
Last Verified: February 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Marta Yanina Pepino de Gruev, Washington University School of Medicine:
taste perception
individual differences
fat
genetics