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New Strategies Against Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02672254
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 3, 2016
Last Update Posted : February 3, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Hospital Clinic of Barcelona
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Silvia Gil Duran, Corporacion Parc Tauli

Brief Summary:
The gold treatment for local invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is surgical excision. Nevertheless, surgery is not always an option as a consequence of the age and/or the health status of the patient. One of the objectives of this study is to assess the effects of cisplatin concomitantly with a subsequent low-energy X-rays irradiation in vitro. In order to enhance the effectiveness of this combined treatment, the temporal fractionation of the platinated compound is expected to be performed.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Radiation: Samples with 2 treatments

Detailed Description:

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) accounts for the 20% of the most common skin malignancies, i.e. the non-melanoma skin cancer. cSCC is considered one public health problem because of the high costs of its treatment as cSCC are increasing due to a higher sun exposure, as well as more efficient dermatological examinations. In addition, this kind of skin cancer is characterized by a relatively high risk of metastasis.

The gold standard treatment for local invasive cSCC is based on the surgical excision, leading to a 5-years control rate in low-risk patients of 96%. Nevertheless, surgery for local invasive cSCC is not always an option as a consequence of the age and/or the poor health status of the patient. Therefore, ionizing radiation is used as either primary or adjuvant therapy against cSCC in elderly patients or when surgery would be extremely invasive. Although radiotherapy seem to be a promising option, it needs to be improved in order to damage locally the tumor area, thus avoiding damaging secondary effects on healthy tissues. Typical skin radiation sources are based on superficial, orthovoltage X-rays (XR) beams, as well as electron-beam therapy.

In particular, irradiations of local invasive cSCC by using a superficial XR source at kilovoltage (kV) energy permit a local dose deposition within the tumor volume, with a significant smaller penetration capacity with respect to the higher-energy XR sources. Therefore, kV XR sources become a perfect tool for the treatment of superficial lesions, such as the cSCC. The combination of these keV-energy photons with metallic atoms localized in the tumor would enhance the dose deposited locally in the target, improving thus the therapeutic index of the treatment. Among all the chemotherapeutic options available, platinum-based agents, such as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin or cisPt) has become an essential anti-cancer drug with a substantial therapeutic impact against the most carcinomas-like tumors.

The distortion of the structure of the DNA duplex, converts cisPt in a highly toxic agent per se because of its influence on DNA replication, apoptotic death, and inhibition of the major nuclear repair pathway of cisPt-DNA adducts and radiation-induced DNA breaks. However, dose administration is a key limitation due to the high toxicity of this agent. It is for this reason that the lowest cisPt concentration was used in this study, and the expected effectiveness of cisPt on a cSCC cells were enhanced with a subsequent low-energy XR irradiation in an attempt to explore some new therapeutic strategies against local invasive cSCC.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 3 participants
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Investigation "in Vitro" of New Strategies Alternative to Surgery Against Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Topical Chemotherapy Followed by Superficial Radiotherapy.
Study Start Date : January 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : January 2016

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Shams
Samples without any type of treatment
Samples with 1 treatment
These samples will be treated with only one therapy: chemical agents such as cisplatin or other metallic compounds, or with superficial radiotherapy. These results will help us understand the effectiveness of each treatment by itself on cSCC cells.
Samples with 2 treatments
These samples will be treated with both, chemical agents followed by superficial radiotherapy. These results will provide us information concerning the effectiveness of both treatments, wich is expected to be enhanced by the concomitant effects.
Radiation: Samples with 2 treatments
Study the concomitant effects between chemo- and radiotherapy by means of cellular techniques.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Study of the effectiveness of each treatment by means of flow cytometry and transmission electron/photon microscopy [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    The flow cytometry allows us to analyze the proportion of alive, apoptotic and dead (or necrotic) cells after each treatment, whereas miscroscopy techniques would help us detect cell morphology changes either after chemical agents or X-rays.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Study of the effectiveness of both treatments concomitantly by means of flow cytometry and transmission electron/photon microscopy [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    The flow cytometry allows us to analyze the proportion of alive, apoptotic and dead (or necrotic) cells after both treatments, whereas miscroscopy techniques would help us detect cell morphology changes (even within the cytoplasm and organelles) after the chemical agents and radiation.


Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA
A431NS cell cultures from ATCC of human cutaneous squamous carcinoma.


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
A431NS human squamous cutaneous carcinoma cell line was obtained from the American Type Culture Collection. A431NS cells were cultured in flasks of 25 cm2 with Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 1% penicillin/streptomycin, and with 10% fetal calf serum to reach confluence. Two hundred thousand cells were seeded per well in 24-well plates, and incubated for 24 hours at 37ºC and 5% CO2.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • human squamous cutaneous carcinoma cell line

Exclusion Criteria:

  • contamination
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Responsible Party: Silvia Gil Duran, Doctorate, Corporacion Parc Tauli
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02672254    
Other Study ID Numbers: FPT-2016.11
First Posted: February 3, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 3, 2016
Last Verified: January 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Carcinoma
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial
Neoplasms by Histologic Type
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Squamous Cell