Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Happy Family Kitchen Movement Project (HFKM)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02563613
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 30, 2015
Last Update Posted : May 4, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
The Hong Kong Council of Social Service
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Henry C.Y. Ho, The University of Hong Kong

Brief Summary:
In recent years, Hong Kong is undergoing rapid changes together with macro social and economic trends. The increasingly complex and diverse family structure is leading to a major concern in the well-being of families, including their health, happiness and harmony (3Hs). Family life and health education should be strengthened to meet the increasing needs of healthy lifestyle promotion. In light of these concerns, the Happy Family Kitchen Movement (HFKM) project, with a focus on "FAMILY Holistic Health", will be conducted at territory-wide level in Hong Kong. HFKM is a community-based research project to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based family intervention program for improving family well-being. It is expected that participants of the community-based family interventions will gain knowledge on family holistic health and in turn promote a healthy lifestyle for 3Hs.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Family Health, Happiness and Harmony Physical Health Psychosocial Health Family Communication Healthy Lifestyle Behavioral: Physical Exercise (PE) Behavioral: Healthy Diet (HD) Other: Wait-list Control (C) Not Applicable

Show Show detailed description

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 3419 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Happy Family Kitchen Movement, A Community-based Research to Enhance Family Health, Happiness and Harmony in Hong Kong: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
Actual Study Start Date : January 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : July 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2017

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Physical Exercise (PE)
Physical exercise will be promoted through the use of one of three positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude and savoring. It will comprise of a core intervention session on physical exercise, a booster session at 1 month to consolidate the knowledge and skills that they have gained, followed by a follow-up session at 3 months on healthy diet. Trained facilitators will have the relevant knowledge and skills to carry out the intervention effectively.
Behavioral: Physical Exercise (PE)
Core session: 2 hours, Booster session: 1 hour

Experimental: Healthy Diet (HD)
Healthy diet will be promoted through the use of one of three positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude and savoring. It will include a core intervention session on healthy diet, a booster session at 1 month to consolidate the knowledge and skills that they have gained, followed by a follow-up session at 3 months on physical exercise. Trained facilitators will have the relevant knowledge and skills to carry out the intervention effectively.
Behavioral: Healthy Diet (HD)
Core session: 2 hours, Booster session: 1 hour

Placebo Comparator: Wait-list Control (C)
The control group will consist of a tea gathering session at the beginning and 1 month later, followed by a follow-up session at 3 months on physical exercise or healthy diet. The tea gathering sessions will cover topics unrelated to the intervention, such as arts and crafts workshops. Trained facilitators will have the relevant knowledge and skills to carry out the intervention effectively.
Other: Wait-list Control (C)
The wait-list control group will receive the intervention at 3 months.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in family health, happiness and harmony (3Hs) from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), immediately after core session, 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session), 3 months after core session (immediately after follow-up session) ]
    Family 3Hs will be assessed by the family well-being scale.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in behaviors on positive psychology, physical exercise and healthy diet from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Theme-related behaviors will be assessed by the behavioral indicator scale.

  2. Changes in family communication from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Family communication will be assessed by the family communication scale.

  3. Changes in life satisfaction from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Life satisfaction will be assessed by the satisfaction with life scale.

  4. Changes in subjective happiness from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), immediately after core session, 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session), 3 months after core session (immediately after follow-up session) ]
    Subjective happiness will be assessed by the subjective happiness scale.

  5. Changes in mental and physical health from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Mental and physical health will be assessed by the SF-12v2 health survey.

  6. Intention to change after core session [ Time Frame: Immediately after core session ]
    Intention to change one's life style after receiving the core session will be assessed by an intention to change scale.

  7. Intention to change after follow-up session [ Time Frame: 3 months after core session (immediately after follow-up session) ]
    Intention to change one's life style after receiving the follow-up session will be assessed by an intention to change scale.

  8. Satisfaction towards core session [ Time Frame: Immediately after core session ]
    Satisfaction towards the core session will be assessed by a program evaluation measure.

  9. Satisfaction towards follow-up session [ Time Frame: 3 months after core session (Immediately after follow-up session) ]
    Satisfaction towards the follow-up session will be assessed by a program evaluation measure.

  10. The process of community-based intervention program [ Time Frame: Up to 3 months ]
    The process evaluation on-site observation questionnaire will be used to assess the process of the community-based intervention programs.


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Changes in physical fitness (muscle endurance) from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Muscle endurance will be assessed through a simple fitness test called seated cycling.

  2. Changes in physical fitness (balance) from baseline to 3 months after intervention [ Time Frame: Before core session (up to 1 week before), 1 month after core session (before booster session), 3 months after core session (before follow-up session) ]
    Balance will be assessed through a simple fitness test called single-leg stand.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   12 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Cantonese speaking
  • Intact verbal and hearing abilities for interpersonal communication
  • Reading and writing abilities for questionnaire completion
  • Willing to participate with 1 or more family members

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants who fail to meet the inclusion criteria

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02563613


Locations
Layout table for location information
China, Hong Kong
The Hong Kong Council of Social Service
Wan Chai, Hong Kong, China
Sponsors and Collaborators
The University of Hong Kong
The Hong Kong Council of Social Service
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Henry C. Y. Ho, PhD The University of Hong Kong
Study Chair: Tai Hing Lam, MD The University of Hong Kong
Study Director: Agnes YK Lai, DN The University of Hong Kong
Publications:
Denham, S. A. (1999). Part I: The definition and practice of family health. Journal of Family Nursing, 5(2), 133-159.
Hanson, S. M., & Boyd, S. T. (1996). Family nursing: An overview. In S. M. Hanson & S. T. Boyd (Eds.), Family health care nursing: Theory, practice, and research (pp. 5-37). Philadelphia: F. A. Davis.
Seligman, M. E. P. (2002). Authentic happiness: Using the new positive psychology to realize your potential for lasting fulfilment. New York: Free Press.
Seligman, M. E. P. (2011). Flourish: A visionary new understanding of happiness and well-being. New York, NY: Free Press.
The FAMILY Project. (2014). FAMILY project cohort study: Baseline findings. Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust Fund and the School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong.
United Nations. (2011). Political declaration of the high-level meeting of the general assembly on the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases. Retrieved from http://ncdalliance.org/sites/default/files/rfiles/UN%20HLM%20Political%20Declaration%20English.pdf

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Dr. Henry C.Y. Ho, Post-doctoral Fellow, The University of Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02563613    
Other Study ID Numbers: HFKM
First Posted: September 30, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 4, 2018
Last Verified: May 2018
Keywords provided by Dr. Henry C.Y. Ho, The University of Hong Kong:
community-based intervention
family holistic health
positive psychology
physical exercise
healthy diet