Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Thalidomide in Treating Crohn's Disease

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02501291
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 17, 2015
Last Update Posted : March 1, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ren Mao, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University

Brief Summary:

Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disease characterized by relapse and progression. The incidence and prevalence of IBD are increasing in different regions around the world, indicating its emergence as a global disease. Though modern medical therapies including immunomodulators and biologic agents have revolutionized treatment of CD, the occurrence of steroids-dependence and resistance or intolerance to medical therapy is quite common. The limitation of present therapeutic management and the high expense of biologic agents leads to the treatment of CD become "refractoriness". The occurrence rate of steroids-dependence and resistance or intolerance to thiopurine therapy is quite high during the course of CD. Approximately 38% of cases required surgery within 10 years. Therefore, the management of such refractory CD remains a great therapeutic challenge for clinicians.

Thalidomide is an oral agent that has immunomodulatory, antiangiogenic and TNF(tumor necrosis factor)-a- suppressing effects. The potential role for thalidomide in the treatment of refractory paediatric and adult CD has been investigated in more and more small open-label studies and retrospective case series. Recently, a randomized controlled trial showed thalidomide improved clinical remission at 8 weeks of treatment and longer-term maintenance of remission in pediatric refractory CD. Gerich et al reported in a retrospective study that thalidomide improved long-term outcomes among 37 refractory CD adults followed up for a median of 58 months. However, the dose of thalidomide used in these studies ranged from 50mg/d to 150mg/d, and the occurrence rate of side effects reported variously but all quite high. The side effects related to the dose of thalidomide were the major concerns of using it in CD. Moreover, the effect of thalidomide on endoscopic response including mucosal healing which is a more objective and important outcome in CD was rarely reported. Therefore the aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy on clinical and endoscopic response and the adverse effects of using low-dose thalidomide in active adult CD patients.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Crohn's Disease Drug: Thalidomide Phase 2

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 47 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Thalidomide in Inducing and Maintaining Remission of Crohn's Disease
Study Start Date : January 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : April 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : April 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Crohn's Disease
Drug Information available for: Thalidomide

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Thalidomide
Thalidomide was administered at a daily dose of 50 mg to the patients. Dosage adjustment of thalidomide from 25mg daily to 100mg daily was tailored individually according to patients' tolerance to thalidomide. To minimize the sedative effect of thalidomide, the investigators recommended patients take a single dose of the study drug in the evening before bedtime.
Drug: Thalidomide



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Clinical remission [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ]
    Clinical remission is defined as CDAI (Crohn's disease activity index) less than 150.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. clinical response and endoscopic efficacy [ Time Frame: 24 weeks ]
    Clinical response was defined as a decrease in CDAI score of ≥100 points from baseline. Endoscopic efficacy was reassessed by ileocolonoscopy at week 24. Endoscopic outcome measures included endoscopic response (decrease in CDEIS score >5 points from baseline of CDEIS of 6 or more), complete remission (CDEIS score <3) and mucosal healing (no ulcer)response was defined as a decrease in CDAI score of ≥100 points from baseline. Endoscopic efficacy was reassessed by ileocolonoscopy at week 24. Endoscopic outcome measures included endoscopic response (decrease in CDEIS score >5 points from baseline of CDEIS of 6 or more), complete remission (CDEIS score <3) and mucosal healing (no ulcer)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

A CDAI score greater than 150 at baseline was required for inclusion .(1) steroid-dependent: unable to reduce steroids below the equivalent of prednisone 10 mg/day (or budesonide below 3 mg/day) within 3 months of starting steroids, or who have a relapse within 3 months of stopping steroids.(2) thiopurines-non-responsive: active disease or clinical relapse despite administration of azathioprine (1.5-2 mg per kg per day) or 6-mercaptopurine (0.75-1.5 mg per kg per day) for 4 months. (3) thiopurines- intolerant: intolerance to or adverse events of thiopurines.

The exclusion criteria were (1) isolated L4 CD; (2) disease including symptomatic stenosis of intestine or abdominal abscess requiring immediate surgery; (3) Current or past history of malignancy or organ transplantation; (4) Serious infections within 3 months; (5) Previous history of neuropathy or symptoms of neuropathy or abnormal electromyography prior to thalidomide; (6) infliximab treatment in the previous 8 weeks; (7) progressive or uncontrolled renal, hepatic, hematological, pulmonary and cardiac disease and(8)ongoing pregnancy.


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02501291


Locations
Layout table for location information
China, Guangdong
The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510080
Sponsors and Collaborators
First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University
Publications of Results:
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Ren Mao, MD,PhD, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02501291    
Other Study ID Numbers: IBD201501
First Posted: July 17, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 1, 2016
Last Verified: February 2016
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Layout table for MeSH terms
Crohn Disease
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Gastroenteritis
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Intestinal Diseases
Thalidomide
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Leprostatic Agents
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiogenesis Modulating Agents
Growth Substances
Growth Inhibitors
Antineoplastic Agents