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Processing of Salient Emotional Stimuli as a Function of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) (AB_THC_CBD)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02291536
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 14, 2014
Last Update Posted : January 16, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim

Brief Summary:

Attentional blink refers to a phenomenon where the detection of the second of two target stimuli that are presented in Short succession within a stream of stimuli is impaired. This is explained by an insufficient availability of attentional resources. Additionally, emotionally salient stimuli, like for example pictures with a positive or negative content, are detected more often compared to neutral pictures during this attentional blink period.

Cannabinoids are involved in the modulation of cognitive, attentional, and emotional processes. Interestingly, data from animals suggests that THC and CBD, both active ingredients in the Cannabis sativa plant, have opposing effects on brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors. CB1 receptors modulate the expression of emotionally salient conditioned association in rats, if salience processes in humans are modulated in the same way remains unclear.

Employing a task to detect salient stimuli, Bhattacharyya et al. (2012) showed that THC seems to make non-salient standard stimuli more salient. They showed decreased activation of the right caudate and increased right prefrontal cortex stimuli during processing of salient stimuli. Importantly, this was associated with decreased response times to standard relative to oddball stimuli. Generally, THC and CBD differentially modulate brain areas associated with attentional salience processing. For example THC seems to increase prefrontal and striatal activation whereas CBD seems to decrease it.

The investigators assume that THC increases the number of correctly detected emotional stimuli during the attentional blink period, whereas CBD has no effect. Additionally, the investigators assume that pictures of the positive category are detected with higher accuracy than negative ones under the influence of THC.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Healthy Humans Drug: tetrahydrocannabinol Drug: cannabidiol Other: placebo Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Processing of Salient Emotional Stimuli as a Function of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD)
Study Start Date : February 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

Drug Information available for: Dronabinol

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: tetrahydrocannabinol
oral administration of 10mg of tetrahydrocannabinol, once
Drug: tetrahydrocannabinol
Experimental: cannabidiol
oral administration of cannabidiol, 600mg, once
Drug: cannabidiol
Placebo Comparator: placebo
oral administration of placebo, once
Other: placebo



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Correctly identified emotional pictures during the attentional blink period [ Time Frame: immediate ]
    Number of correctly identified emotional pictures that were presented during the attentional blink period.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Reaction time to correctly identified emotional pictures during the attentional blink period [ Time Frame: immediate ]
    Reaction time (in ms) of the button press to the correctly identified emotional pictures that were presented during the attentional blink period.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • male
  • age between 18 and 65 years
  • right-handed

Exclusion Criteria:

  • consumption of cannabis more than 5 times
  • substance abuse (apart from nicotine)
  • psychiatric disorders
  • epilepsy
  • chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02291536


Locations
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Germany
Central Institute of Mental Health
Mannheim, Germany, 68159
Sponsors and Collaborators
Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Oliver Grimm, MD Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim

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Responsible Party: Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02291536     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AB_THC_CBD
First Posted: November 14, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 16, 2015
Last Verified: November 2014
Keywords provided by Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim:
THC and CBD
Attentional blink
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Epidiolex
Dronabinol
Anticonvulsants
Hallucinogens
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Psychotropic Drugs
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists
Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators
Neurotransmitter Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Hormones
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists