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Trial record 9 of 84 for:    Developmental Disabilities | ( Map: Canada )

Using the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model to Reduce Problem Behaviors in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02153203
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : June 2, 2014
Last Update Posted : October 25, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marc Lanovaz, Université de Montréal

Brief Summary:
Children with autism spectrum disorders often engage in problem behaviors such as self-injury, destruction, aggression, and stereotypy. Prior research has clearly shown that these problem behaviors may interfere with learning, daily functioning, and social participation. As such, engaging in problem behaviors has a negative impact on the health and quality of life of children with autism spectrum disorders and their families. One promising solution to reduce problem behaviors in this population is the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce (PTR) model, which relies on the evidence-based practices of positive behavior support. Although the use of PTR has been gaining considerably support in schools, the model has never been evaluated as part of a rigorous large-scale study using parents as interventionists. Thus, the purpose of the project is to conduct an assessment of the effectiveness of a home-based version of the PTR model in reducing problem behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders and in improving families' quality of life. Our hypotheses are that implementing the PTR will (a) produce larger reductions in problem behaviors than participating in an individual parent training session, (b) increase engagement in prosocial behaviors, (c) decrease parental stress, and (c) improve the quality of life of the family. The results of the study will allow an examination of whether PTR is an effective and acceptable model to reduce problem behaviors at home in this population. Given that problem behaviors incur high societal costs when they persist into adolescence and adulthood, the study may potentially lead to large cost reductions in the treatment of difficulties associated with autism spectrum disorders. By reducing engagement in problem behaviors, the implementation of the model may also promote and facilitate the social participation as well as improve the quality of life and health of children with autism spectrum disorders and their families.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive Behavioral: Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model Other: Individual Parent Training Session Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 42 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Using the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model to Reduce Problem Behaviors in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Study Start Date : October 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : September 2016

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Behavioral approach
The Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model will be implemented with families in their home settings.
Behavioral: Prevent-Teach-Reinforce Model
Implementation of the model once to twice per week over a period of 8 weeks

Active Comparator: Educational approach
Each child's parent will participate in one 2- to 3-hour individual parent training session on the assessment and treatment of problem behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders.
Other: Individual Parent Training Session
One 2- to 3-hour individual parent training session on the assessment and treatment of problem behavior




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline in parental report of problem behavior at 8 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 8 weeks later ]
    Problem behavior scale of the Problem Behavior Inventory


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline in quality of life at 8 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 8 weeks later ]
    Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale

  2. Change from baseline in parental report of stress at 20 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 20 weeks later ]
    Parenting Stress Index Short Form

  3. Change from baseline in parental report of stress at 8 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 8 weeks later ]
    Parenting Stress Index Short Form

  4. Change from baseline in quality of life at 20 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 20 weeks later ]
    Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale

  5. Social validity of the intervention [ Time Frame: After 8 weeks of intervention ]
    Treatment Acceptability Rating Form - Revised

  6. Change from baseline in parental report of problem behavior at 20 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 20 weeks later ]
    Problem behavior scale of the Problem Behavior Inventory

  7. Change from baseline in parental report of positive social behavior at 20 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 20 weeks later ]
    Positive social behavior scale of the Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form

  8. Change from baseline in parental report of positive social behavior at 8 weeks [ Time Frame: Prior to the start of the intervention and 8 weeks later ]
    Positive social behavior scale of the Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form



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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 12 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder
  • Must exhibit problem behavior

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Already receiving services to reduce problem behaviors at home

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02153203


Locations
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Canada, Quebec
West Montreal Readaptation Centre
Lachine, Quebec, Canada
Gold Centre
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
CRDITED de Montréal
Montréal, Quebec, Canada, H3L 3T1
Sponsors and Collaborators
Université de Montréal
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Marc Lanovaz Université de Montréal

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Responsible Party: Marc Lanovaz, Assistant Professor, Université de Montréal
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02153203     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: CERFAS-2014-15-058-P
First Posted: June 2, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 25, 2016
Last Verified: October 2016

Keywords provided by Marc Lanovaz, Université de Montréal:
Autism spectrum disorder
Problem behavior

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Disease
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Problem Behavior
Developmental Disabilities
Pathologic Processes
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders
Behavioral Symptoms