COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
Working…
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Mental Health First Aid for College Students

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02021344
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : December 27, 2013
Last Update Posted : December 27, 2013
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Daniel Eisenberg, University of Michigan

Brief Summary:
Most college students with mental disorders do not receive treatment, and over 80% of those who die by suicide have never made contact with campus mental health services. Knowledge, stigma, and other health beliefs represent significant barriers to help-seeking for many of these students. However, there have been no large-scale intervention studies for reducing these barriers to mental health treatment on college campuses. This project will fill this gap by determining whether a community mental health education program, Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), is an effective method to increase number of students who seek mental health services on college campuses. MHFA is an international, 12-hour training program that has been shown to increase knowledge of mental illnesses and their treatments, decrease stigma, and increase helping behaviors in community members. However, it has not been tested in a college setting in the United States. To determine the effectiveness of MHFA in US colleges, the proposed project will involve a randomized control trial of the MHFA training program on 32 campuses representing a range of higher education institutions, from community colleges in rural areas to research universities in large, urban areas. The MHFA training program will be administered to peer supports such as residential advisors. Administrative data from campus mental health services and pre- and post-intervention surveys will be used to collect outcome data on service utilization, knowledge, attitudes, and other measures. Data analyses will focus on identifying changes in students' behaviors, knowledge, and attitudes toward mental illnesses that can be attributed to the MHFA training. In addition to testing a novel and timely mental health intervention for college students, this project will result in improved data collection measures for college populations, and will lay the foundation for stronger connections and future collaborations between diverse campus communities. If the MHFA program is successful in reducing stigma and increasing general on-campus awareness and early treatment of emerging mental health problems, then it may provide a cost-effective means for enabling more students to seek early treatments for developing mental health problems.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Depression Anxiety Suicidal Ideation Eating Disorders Behavioral: Mental Health First Aid Not Applicable

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 2543 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Mental Health First Aid for College Students: A Multi-campus Randomized Control Trial of a Community Health Intervention
Study Start Date : September 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 2011
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2011

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Pure control
Practice as usual (no MHFA) in all residences on these campuses.
Experimental: Intervention residence on mixed campus
Mental Health First Aid delivered to these residences, but not all other residences at the same campus.
Behavioral: Mental Health First Aid
Originally developed in 2001, MHFA is a 12-hour course comprised of six modules, covering depression, anxiety, psychosis, substance abuse, eating disorders, and self-harm. Each module includes information about the mental health-related problems (e.g., signs and symptoms), advice on how to respond appropriately, and interactive activities to enhance the learning process. Some modules include videos with perspectives of individuals recovering from mental disorders and examples of how to effectively use the MHFA intervention. Program participants learn how to help individuals in crisis and also how to recognize early warning signs and intervene before mental health problems progress to crises.

Experimental: Pure intervention residence
Mental Health First Aid delivered to this residence and all other residences at the same campus
Behavioral: Mental Health First Aid
Originally developed in 2001, MHFA is a 12-hour course comprised of six modules, covering depression, anxiety, psychosis, substance abuse, eating disorders, and self-harm. Each module includes information about the mental health-related problems (e.g., signs and symptoms), advice on how to respond appropriately, and interactive activities to enhance the learning process. Some modules include videos with perspectives of individuals recovering from mental disorders and examples of how to effectively use the MHFA intervention. Program participants learn how to help individuals in crisis and also how to recognize early warning signs and intervene before mental health problems progress to crises.

No Intervention: Control at mixed campus
Practice as usual (no MHFA) at this residence, but some other residences at same campus are in experimental condition (MHFA).



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in mental health service utilization [ Time Frame: baseline, 2 months ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Student enrolled in a participating campus as a full-time, residential undergraduate during the 2009-2010 or 2010-2011 academic years. Student must have been living in a participating residence hall.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Students under 18 years of age.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02021344


Locations
Layout table for location information
United States, Michigan
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, 48104
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Michigan
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Daniel Eisenberg, PhD University of Michigan
Principal Investigator: Nicole L Speer, PhD University of Colorado, Denver
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Daniel Eisenberg, Associate Professor, Department of Health Management & Policy, University of Michigan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02021344    
Other Study ID Numbers: NIMH 1RC1MH089757-01
1RC1MH089757-01 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: December 27, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 27, 2013
Last Verified: December 2013
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Layout table for MeSH terms
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Suicidal Ideation
Behavioral Symptoms
Mental Disorders
Suicide
Self-Injurious Behavior