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Physician Self Disclosure of IUC Use

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01994356
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 25, 2013
Last Update Posted : November 25, 2013
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Mya Zapata, University of Michigan

Brief Summary:
As many as one-third of female healthcare providers use intrauterine contraception (IUC), but only about 8 percent of US women overall do. This begs the question: Might physician self-disclosure of personal IUC use increase IUC use among patients? However, the positive or negative impact of physician self disclosure on IUC uptake or patient satisfaction is generally unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if physician self-disclosure of personal IUC use increases patient use of IUC or impacts patients' satisfaction with their clinical encounter.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Contraception Behavioral: Physician self-disclosure of personal IUC use Behavioral: Usual contraceptive counseling Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
We performed a prospective randomized block design pilot trail of usual contraceptive counseling versus usual counseling plus physician self-disclosure of personal intrauterine contraceptive use.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 132 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Pilot Study of Physician Self-disclosure of Personal Intrauterine Contraceptive Use Versus Usual Counseling
Study Start Date : January 2011
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2013

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Birth Control

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Usual contraceptive counseling
subjects received usual contraceptive counseling
Behavioral: Usual contraceptive counseling
all subjects recieved usual contraceptive counseling
Other Name: contraceptive counseling

Experimental: Physician self-disclosure of IUC use
subjects received usual contraceptive counseling plus intervention which was Physician self-disclosure of personal IUC use during the counseling
Behavioral: Physician self-disclosure of personal IUC use
Physicians self-disclosed personal intrauterine contraceptive use to subjects in intervention arm of study during contraceptive counseling




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Intrauterine contraceptive use [ Time Frame: immediately following clinical encounter and at 2 months ]
    All subjects were surveyed to determine use of intrauterine contraceptive immediately after their clinical visit where contraceptive counseling was received and at 2 months after their clinical encounter to assess intrauterine contraceptive use.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Satisfaction with clinical encounter [ Time Frame: immediately following clinical encounter and at 2 months ]
    All subjects were surveyed to determine their with satisfaction with their overall clinical encounter immediately following their clinical encounter at at 2 months. Satisfaction was measured using a 5 point scale.


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Satisfaction with contraceptive method [ Time Frame: immediately following clinical enocunter and at 2 months ]
    All subjects were surveyed to determine satisfaction with their contraceptive method of choice immediately following their clinical encounter and at 2 months. Satisfaction was measured using a 5 point scale.

  2. Satisfaction with provider [ Time Frame: immediately following clinical encounter and at 2 months ]
    All subjects were surveyed to determine satisfaction with their provider immediately following their clinical encounter and at 2 months. Satisfaction was measured using a 5 point scale.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 44 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • reproductive age
  • currently sexually active
  • scheduled for benign gynecology visit, annual exam, or family planning visit

Exclusion Criteria:

  • seeking pregnancy within 1 year
  • currently using IUC
  • prior sterilization procedure
  • currently pregnant

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01994356


Locations
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United States, Michigan
University of Michigan Medical Center
Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, 48109
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Michigan
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Responsible Party: Mya Zapata, Clinical Lecturer, University of Michigan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01994356    
Other Study ID Numbers: IUC Disclosure
N014264 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: Sociey of Family Planning )
First Posted: November 25, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 25, 2013
Last Verified: November 2013
Keywords provided by Mya Zapata, University of Michigan:
Contraceptive counseling
Physician self disclosure
Satisfaction
Intrauterine contraceptive use
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Contraceptive Agents
Reproductive Control Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs