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The Acute Effect of Interval-walking (acute IWS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01987258
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 19, 2013
Last Update Posted : February 27, 2014
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Inge Holm, Rigshospitalet, Denmark

Brief Summary:

Four months of interval walking training (IWT) is superior to energy-expenditure matched continuous walking training (CWT) with regards to weight loss and improvements in glycemic control. The reason for this is unclear. One potential explanation for the differential outcome in weight loss is excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), which is defined as the elevated oxygen consumption measured during the hours following an exercise bout. A large EPOC means greater energy expenditure which, if energy intake does not change, leads to a greater weight loss. This weight loss may subsequently improve glycemic control

  • Aim 1: To assess the effect of an acute bout of IWT vs. an acute bout of CWT on glycemic control in type 2 diabetics and to assess mechanisms responsible for differences (if any). It is hypothesised that IWT will be more advantageous for improving glycemic control.
  • Aim 2: To examine the effect of an acute bout of IWT vs. an acute bout of CWT on EPOC. It is hypothesised that IWT will produce an EPOC of larger magnitude than CWT.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Behavioral: Interval Walking Behavioral: Continuous walking Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 10 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Acute Effect of Interval-walking
Study Start Date : June 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Control
No exercise (control experiment)
Experimental: Interval Walking
A one hour interval walking exercise bout
Behavioral: Interval Walking
Other Names:
  • Interval exercise
  • Interval training

Experimental: Continuous walking
A one hour continuous walking exercise bout
Behavioral: Continuous walking
Other Names:
  • Continuous exercise
  • Continuous training




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Glycemic control [ Time Frame: Will be assessed immediately after the intervention using a mixed meal tolerance test (duration: 5 hours) followed by continuous glucose monitoring (duration: 48 hours). ]
    Glycemic control will be assessed after a one hour specific exercise intervention (control/continuous walking/interval walking) in a controlled setting (a mixed meal tolerance test). Moreover, glycemic control will be assessed during the following 2 days in a free-living environment, using continuous glucose monitoring systems.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) [ Time Frame: Will be assessed immediately after the intervention using a ventilated hood (duration: 5 hours). ]
    EPOC will be assessed during the hours following the before-mentioned specific exercise bouts using the indirect calorimetry ventilated hood technique.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diabetes mellitus, type 2

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Smoking
  • Pregnancy
  • insulin dependence
  • Contraindication to physical activity (as judged by medical history and screening)
  • Evidence of thyroid, liver, lung, kidney or heart disease

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01987258


Locations
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Denmark
Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism (CIM), Rigshospitalet, Tagensvej 20, section M7641
Copenhagen, Denmark, 2100
Sponsors and Collaborators
Rigshospitalet, Denmark
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Kristian Karstoft, MD Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism (CIM), Rigshospitalet, Tagensvej 20, section M7641, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Inge Holm, Administrator, Rigshospitalet, Denmark
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01987258    
Other Study ID Numbers: H-3-2012-141
First Posted: November 19, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 27, 2014
Last Verified: February 2014
Keywords provided by Inge Holm, Rigshospitalet, Denmark:
Glycemic control
excess post-exercise oxygen consumption
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases