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Effect of African Leafy Vegetables on Nutritional Status of South African School Children. (ALV)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01920646
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 12, 2013
Last Update Posted : August 12, 2013
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Medical Research Council, South Africa
Agricultural Research Council of South Africa
Sight and Life
Program to Support Pro-poor Policy Development (PSPPD)
National Research Foundation of South Africa
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marinka van der Hoeven, North-West University, South Africa

Brief Summary:

The combination of poverty-related infectious and lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases, both driven by malnutrition, causes a high burden for South Africa. Healthy and nutritious diets for populations depend on availability and accessibility of a variety of plant and animal foods, within a context that promotes and supports healthy behaviour. Food based strategies, such as supplementation, food fortification, and diversification of crops, are used to achieve optimal dietary requirements to combat malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. A more sustainable food based strategy is the (promotion of) use of indigenous and traditional foods, such as African Leafy Vegetables (ALVs). Unfortunately, several studies from all over Africa have shown that there is a shift from traditional diets as result of the preparing techniques and the absence of women in homes. Furthermore, indigenous and traditional foods are considered as "poor people's food".

Against this background, a joint project between South Africa, Kenya and Benin is designed to fill the gaps in knowledge in these countries regarding the availability, acceptability and consumption and evidenced based benefits of foods from local biodiversity. The main aim of the study in South Africa is to provide empirical evidence of how the role of biodiversity can be translated into improved health status in contemporary poor rural and urban communities in the North West Province of South Africa. In order to achieve this it is important to gain knowledge on the possibility of using ALVs as a strategy to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies. Therefore an intervention study to determine the effect of selected ALV on the nutritional status (including zinc, iron, and vitamin A status) of school children (grade R-4) residing in contemporary poor rural community in the North West Province, South Africa has been designed.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Iron Status Vitamin A Status Zinc Status Malnutrition Other: ALV Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 171 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Official Title: The Effect of African Leafy Vegetables on Nutritional Status (Including Iron, Zinc and Vitamin A Status) of School Children Residing in Semi-rural Farm Community in the North West Province of South Africa
Study Start Date : February 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 2012
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2012

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Iron Vitamin A

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: ALV

300 gram cooked African leafy vegetables and school meal starch as daily school meal (5 days/weeks) for 3 months.

Selected African leafy vegetables:Amaranthus cruentus (amaranth), Vigna unguiculata (cowpea), Cleome gynandra (spiderplant), and Cucurbita maxima (pumpkin).

Other: ALV
Random allocation of children of two rural farm schools per grade to receive either 300 gram cooked ALVs and school meal starch or the normal school meal as daily meal (5 days/weeks) for 3 months.

No Intervention: Control
normal school meal as daily meal (5 days/weeks) for 3 months



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in nutritional status of school children (nutritional status measured by: blood haemoglobin, serum ferritin, serum zinc and serum retinol) [ Time Frame: three months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in nutritional status of school children (nutritional status measured by: height-for-age z-score, weight-for-age z-score and BMI-for-age z-score) [ Time Frame: three months ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 12 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • apparently healthy and had no signs and symptoms of acute illness at the time of baseline blood collection
  • attending grade R - 4 of one of the selected schools

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Children with a haemoglobin concentration <8 g/dL were excluded from the study and referred for medical treatment.
  • Children who received micronutrient supplements were also excluded from the study.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01920646


Locations
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South Africa
Sizamela Intermediate School and Buffelsvlei Intermediate School
Rysmierbult, North West Province, South Africa
Sponsors and Collaborators
North-West University, South Africa
Medical Research Council, South Africa
Agricultural Research Council of South Africa
Sight and Life
Program to Support Pro-poor Policy Development (PSPPD)
National Research Foundation of South Africa
Investigators
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Study Director: Marius Smuts, PhD North-West University
Study Director: Annamarie Kruger, PhD North-West University
Principal Investigator: Marinka van der Hoeven, MSc North-West University

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Responsible Party: Marinka van der Hoeven, Mrs Marinka van der Hoeven, North-West University, South Africa
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01920646     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: ALV study
First Posted: August 12, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 12, 2013
Last Verified: August 2013

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Malnutrition
Nutrition Disorders