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Individual Differences in Children's Susceptibility to Overeating

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01905293
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 23, 2013
Last Update Posted : July 23, 2013
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Pennsylvania

Brief Summary:
The portion size of foods has been identified as an important determinant of energy intake in children. It remains to be determined to what extent child weight status and the relative reinforcing value of food may interact with the obesogenic food environment to affect energy intake. The primary aim of this study was to compare energy intake at a meal in normal-weight and obese children when the portion size of palatable, energy-dense foods and a sugar-sweetened beverage was systematically increased. We hypothesized that increasing the portion size of all foods and the beverage at a meal will lead to a significant increase in energy intake in both normal-weight and obese children. Obese children, however, will show a significantly greater increase in energy intake than will normal-weight children. A second aim of this study was to test if children's response to increases in portion size was affected by how reinforcing they find food to be. We hypothesized that, when controlling for BMI, children who find food very reinforcing relative to nonfood alternatives will show a significantly greater increase in energy intake than will children who find food less reinforcing.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Obesity Other: Feeding Study Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
The prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity has reached an all-time high. There is a pressing need to better understand the behavioral mechanisms that control appetite and eating in children and to identify children who are most susceptible to overeating in the current obesogenic food environment. Obesogenic environments offer convenient access to large portions of palatable, energy-dense foods. The portion size of foods has been identified as an important determinant of energy intake in adults and children. While portion size effects have been found in heterogenous groups of healthy individuals, some evidence points to possible individual differences in the magnitude of children's responsiveness to large food portions. For example, data from a previous laboratory study suggest that overweight and obese children may be particularly vulnerable to overeating when presented with large food portions. Further, the magnitude of a portion size effect on intake may also depend on how reinforcing (or rewarding) children find food to be. It is possible that the relative reinforcing value of food may interact with environmental cues, such as the portion size of food, to affect children's energy intake when large portions of palatable, energy-dense foods are available. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effects of increasing the portion size of all foods and a beverage served at a meal on energy intake in normal-weight and obese children. A second aim is to test if children who find food very reinforcing relative to an appealing nonfood alternative will show a significantly greater increase in energy intake in response to increasing portion sizes than will children who find food less reinforcing. The findings from this study are expected to extend previous findings to test how environmental factors, such as food portion size, may interact with individual differences in weight status or food reinforcement to affect energy intake in children.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Individual Differences in Children's Susceptibility to Overeating
Study Start Date : May 2011
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2012

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: 100% portion size
100% portion size condition
Other: Feeding Study
Experimental: 150% portion size
150% portion size condition
Other: Feeding Study
Experimental: 200% portion size
200% portion size condition
Other: Feeding Study



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Total energy intake [ Time Frame: Up to 3 weeks ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Energy intake from food [ Time Frame: Up to 3 weeks ]
  2. Energy intake from beverage [ Time Frame: Up to 3 weeks ]
  3. Percent estimated energy requirement (%EER) [ Time Frame: Up to 3 weeks ]
  4. Relative reinforcing value of food (RRVF) [ Time Frame: Up to 3 weeks ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 10 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 8 to 10 years of age
  • normal-weight or obese
  • like most foods that were served in the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • serious medical conditions or medication use known to affect appetite, food intake, and body weight
  • developmental or psychiatric conditions
  • learning disability
  • sight or hearing impairment
  • food allergies or nutrient intolerances (including lactose intolerance)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01905293


Locations
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United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pennsylvania
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Tanja VE Kral, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
Additional Information:
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Responsible Party: University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01905293    
Other Study ID Numbers: R03DK091492 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: July 23, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 23, 2013
Last Verified: June 2013
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Hyperphagia
Signs and Symptoms, Digestive
Signs and Symptoms