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Metabolic Response to Playing Video Games

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01809470
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified January 2013 by University College, London.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : March 12, 2013
Last Update Posted : April 9, 2013
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Newcastle University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University College, London

Brief Summary:
The study is investigating the metabolic response to playing competitive non-violent and competitive violent video games. The primary hypothesis is that the metabolic response in the violent game group will differ from the other two groups, due to activation of the stress response. The investigators are using an experimental approach, whereby 72 young men are randomised to one of three groups: watching television (TV), playing the non-violent video game 'FIFA2013', or playing the violent video game 'Call of Duty'. Participants arrive fasted, and are given a standardised breakfast. After measurements of weight, height and waist girth, they then are assigned to one of the three groups. Baseline blood pressure, heart rate and appetite/mood data are collected, along with a saliva sample for measurement of the 'stress' hormone, cortisol. The investigators will collect these data again at 4 time-points during the one hour game-playing session. At the end of the study, the allow the participants half an hour of rest, during which they can choose from a variety of sweet or savoury snacks. The investigators will compare the data from the three groups, to test whether changes in blood pressure, heart rate and salivary cortisol, as well as snack consumption, are greater in the group playing the violent game.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Blood Pressure Behavioral: FIFA2013 Behavioral: Call of Duty Behavioral: Watching TV Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Our study is investigating the metabolic response to playing competitive non-violent and competitive violent video games. Our primary hypothesis is that the metabolic response in the violent game group will differ from the other two groups, due to activation of the stress response.

We are using an experimental approach, whereby 72 young men are randomised to one of three groups: watching TV, playing the non-violent video game 'FIFA2013', or playing the violent video game 'Call of Duty'. All participants must already have some experience playing the two games, so that whichever group they are assigned to, they can comply with the protocol.

Participants arrive after an overnight fast, and are given a standardised breakfast (a muffin, approx 300 kcal, and a glass of water). After measurements of weight, height and waist girth, they then are assigned to one of the three groups, and allowed to familiarise themselves with the games console or TV. Baseline data on blood pressure (in triplicate, Accutor digital monitor), heart rate (Polar monitor) and appetite/mood (visual analogue scale) are collected, along with a saliva sample for measurement of the 'stress' hormone, cortisol, as well as satiety hormones sich as leptin and ghrelin. We will collect these data again at 4 time-points during the one hour game-playing session, by pausing the game or TV for 4 minutes at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the session starts.

At the end of the study, we allow the participants half an hour of rest, during which they can choose from a variety of sweet or savoury snacks or fruit, and several drinks.

We will compare the data from the three groups, to test whether changes in blood pressure, heart rate, appetite/mood and salivary hormones, as well as snack consumption, are greater in the group playing the violent game.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 72 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Metabolic Response to Playing Video Games
Study Start Date : February 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2013

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Watching TV
Watching TV (comedy, 'Friends') for 1 hour
Behavioral: Watching TV
Watching TV for 1 hour

Experimental: FIFA2013
Playing the video game 'FIFA2013' for 1 hour
Behavioral: FIFA2013
Playing FIFA2013 for 1 hour

Experimental: Call of Duty
Playing the video game 'Call of duty' for 1 hour
Behavioral: Call of Duty
Playing Call of Duty for 1 hour




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Blood pressure [ Time Frame: Over the 90 minutes of the study ]
    Systolic and diastolic blood pressure


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Heart rate [ Time Frame: Over the 90 minute duration of the study ]
    Heart rate by Polar monitor

  2. Appetite [ Time Frame: Over the 90 minute duration of the study ]
    Appetite by visual analogue scale, and by a test meal at the end of the study

  3. Stress [ Time Frame: Over the 90 minute duration of the study ]
    Salivary cortisol

  4. Satiety [ Time Frame: Over the 90 minute duration of the study ]
    Salivary ghrelin and leptin



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI >25 kg/m2

Exclusion Criteria:

  • smoker
  • weight change >3 kg in the previous three months
  • psychiatric disorder
  • uncontrolled hypertension
  • coronary heart disease, heart failure and central or peripheral arteriopathies
  • alcohol consumption > 21 units/week.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01809470


Contacts
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Contact: Jonathan C Wells, PhD +442079052389 Jonathan.Wells@ucl.ac.uk

Locations
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United Kingdom
UCL Institute of Child Health Recruiting
London, United Kingdom, WC1N 1EH
Contact: Jonathan C Wells, PhD    +442079052389    Jonathan.Wells@ucl.ac.uk   
Principal Investigator: Jonathan C Wells, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University College, London
Newcastle University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jonathan C Wells, PhD UCL Institute of Child Health

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Responsible Party: University College, London
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01809470     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UCL-VG-001
First Posted: March 12, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 9, 2013
Last Verified: January 2013

Keywords provided by University College, London:
Blood pressure
Appetite
Heart rate
Salivary cortisol