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Effect of Physical Activity an Stress in Children

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01693926
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 26, 2012
Last Update Posted : March 25, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jardena Puder, University of Lausanne Hospitals

Brief Summary:

The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of physical activity in obese and nonobese prepubertal children on:

  1. biological stress responses during a psychosocial stress test
  2. snacking and feeling of hunger in response to the same psychosocial stress test
  3. the moderating factor of attachment on the biological stress responses and on snacking

Children will be investigated on one study day during 3.5 hours.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Obesity Children Physical Activity Stress Snacking Behavioral: Acute physical activity intervention Behavioral: placebo Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Hypotheses In this study, 3 primary hypotheses will be tested.

  1. Moderate physical activity during 25 min in children decreases the cortisol levels in response to the Trier Social Stress Test TSST-C (for children).
  2. Moderate physical activity during 25 min in children decreases the snacking (calorie consumption when corrected for expenditure and switch in quality of food intake) in response to the Trier Social Stress Test TSST-C (for children).
  3. A secure attachment will be a moderating factor for the general increase in cortisol and the snacking in response to the psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test TSST-C).

Secondary objectives:

  1. To test if the impact of physical activity on stress responses and snacking differs between obese and non-obese children
  2. To test the impact of physical activity on the cardiovascular stress reactivity (blood pressure, heart rate) and the perceived stress (scale) in response to the Trier Social Stress Test TSST-C?
  3. To test if the stress reactivity and its modulation by physical activity is different in anxious and in impulsives/labile children
  4. To test if serious life events and parental worries and parental educational style influence the stress reactivity

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effect of Physical Activity an Stress in Children
Actual Study Start Date : September 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Acute physical activity intervention
25 min of moderate physical activity
Behavioral: Acute physical activity intervention
25 min of physical activity. The placebo arm will have 25 min of reading.

Placebo Comparator: Placebo
25 min of reading (instead of physical activity)
Behavioral: placebo



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in salivary Cortisol and maximal levels of salivary cortisol in response to the TSST stress test over 2 hours [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
  2. Snacking (Caloric intake, corrected for energy expenditure) [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
    Measure of caloric intake and measure of choice of high-caloric vs low-caloric food snacking after the TSST stress test

  3. Moderator effect of attachment (4 different attachment categories), i.e. children with a secure attachment will have lower rises in cortisol compared with children in the other 3 attachment categories [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
    Cortisol levels after the TSST stress test will be lower in children with secure attachment compared to detached, disorganized or preoccupied children (i.e. the 3 other attachment categories).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Moderator effect of obesity (WHO criteria) [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
  2. Cardiovascular reactivity (changes and maximal levels of blood pressure, heart rate) [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
  3. Perceived stress (stress scale from 1-7) [ Time Frame: 9 months ]
  4. Moderator role of serious life events and parental worries [ Time Frame: 9 months ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   7 Years to 10 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 7-10 year old children

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Severe illness
  • Medications interfering with study

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01693926


Locations
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Switzerland
Univeristy of Lausanne, SUPEA
Lausanne, VD, Switzerland, 1011
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Lausanne Hospitals

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Jardena Puder, Medin adjoint, University of Lausanne Hospitals
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01693926    
Other Study ID Numbers: 286/12
First Posted: September 26, 2012    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 25, 2020
Last Verified: March 2020
Keywords provided by Jardena Puder, University of Lausanne Hospitals:
Obesity
Children
Physical activity
Stress
Snacking
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms