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Combined Effects of Energy Density and Eating Rate on Appetite

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01406886
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 1, 2011
Last Update Posted : October 17, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
James Philip Karl, United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine

Brief Summary:
This study will examine the independent and combined effects of energy density and eating rate on appetite and endocrine mediators of appetite. Increasing eating rate and energy intake are expected to additively increase energy intake.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Appetite Behavioral: Eating rate Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Combined Effects of Energy Density and Eating Rate on Energy Intake and Biomarkers of Satiety
Study Start Date : December 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2010
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2010

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Energy density
Low or high energy density meal
Behavioral: Eating rate



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Energy intake [ Time Frame: 1 meal ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Subjective appetite [ Time Frame: 0-180 min ]
  2. Postprandial peptide-YY response [ Time Frame: 0-180 min ]
  3. Postprandial ghrelin response [ Time Frame: 0-180 min ]
  4. Postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 response [ Time Frame: 0-180 min ]
  5. Postprandial pancreatic polypeptide response [ Time Frame: 0-180 min ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 55 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI 18-27 kg/m2
  • Weight stable

Exclusion criteria:

  • Chronic used of OTC or prescription drugs known to affect metabolism
  • Chronic disease
  • Gastric bypass surgery
  • Disordered eating
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01406886


Locations
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United States, Massachusetts
USARIEM
Natick, Massachusetts, United States, 01760
Sponsors and Collaborators
United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Scott J Montain, PhD US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: James Philip Karl, Research Dietitian, United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01406886    
Other Study ID Numbers: H09-28
First Posted: August 1, 2011    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 17, 2017
Last Verified: October 2017
Keywords provided by James Philip Karl, United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine:
Modifiable environmental
behavioral factors