Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Effects of Interactive Video Game Cycling on Obese Adolescent Health

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00983970
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 24, 2009
Last Update Posted : September 24, 2009
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Canadian Diabetes Association
Information provided by:
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Brief Summary:
Exercise is an important component in the treatment of of child obesity and associated medical conditions. However, one of the strongest predictors of non-compliance from exercise programs in obese youth is lack of enjoyment, thus creating a more pleasurable environment, by using TV or video games as incentives, may be an effective way of increasing exercise in obese youth. The purpose of this study was to compare interactive video game stationary cycling (GameBike ®) with cycling to music on aerobic fitness, body composition, cardiovascular disease risk markers, and exercise behaviour as measured by attendance, energy expenditure, duration, intensity and distance pedaled in obese adolescents. Twenty six obese adolescents had an equal chance of being assigned to either interactive video game cycling (n=13) or cycling to music serving as controls (n=13). The 10-week program consisted of twice weekly sessions lasting a maximum of 60 minutes per session.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Overweight With Comorbidity Obesity Behavioral: Interactive video game cycling Behavioral: Cycling to Music Phase 4

Detailed Description:

Background: Energy expenditure through exercise is important for weight loss and reduction of medical morbidity associated with adolescent obesity. However, attrition from aerobic exercise programs is high in obese children as they do not tolerate it or enjoy it. Capitalizing on technology to use TV or video games as incentives to exercise may improve adherence to exercise and associated health benefits in obese adolescents.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of interactive video game stationary cycling (GameBike ®) with cycling to music on aerobic fitness, body composition, cardiovascular disease risk markers, and exercise behaviour as measured by attendance, energy expenditure, duration, intensity and distance pedaled in obese adolescents.

Method: Twenty six obese adolescents were stratified by gender and randomized to a either interactive video game cycling (n=13) or cycling to music serving as controls (n=13). The 10-week program consisted of twice weekly sessions lasting a maximum of 60 minutes per session.

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 30 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of Interactive Video Game Cycling on Obese Adolescent Health
Study Start Date : May 2007
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2009
Actual Study Completion Date : March 2009

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Interactive video cycling
Interactive video cycling arm utilized the Gamebike that interfaced a Sony Play Station 2 with a stationary bicycle and a 42 inch flat screen TV. The Gamebike has a handle bar mounted game controller allowing the participant to play most Sony Play Station 2 raced-based video games. The Gamebike reads the participants' speed by cycling cadence and the faster the individual pedalled, the faster they moved in the virtual world on screen. Participants were asked to come to the lab for two sessions per week for 60 minutes for 10 weeks.Participants were told that they could exercise at any intensity or duration that they desired, and reading materials were provided for those who did not chose to exercise for the full 60 minute session.
Behavioral: Interactive video game cycling
Participants were required to exercise on a Gamebike® (Cat Eye Electronics Ltd, Boulder Col.) interactive video gaming system that was interfaced with a Sony Play Station 2® (Sony computer Entertainment America Inc. Foster, City, CA) and a 42" flat screen television monitor. The Gamebike® has a handlebar mounted game controller allowing the participant to play most Sony Playstation 2- race-based video games. The Gamebike® reads the participant's speed by cycling cadence and the faster the individual pedalled, the faster they moved in the virtual world on screen. Participants were told that they could exercise at any intensity and duration they desired. Participants were asked to come to the lab for two sessions per week for 60 minutes for 10 weeks. Although participants were required to stay in the lab for 60 minutes, they could take breaks or stop when they wanted, and reading materials were available for those who did not or could not cycle for the full 60 minute session.

Active Comparator: Cycling to Music
Each participant exercised twice weekly for 10 weeks on the Gamebike® but the games and controls were turned off. The Gamebike® was used by both groups to control for any differences between two cycle ergometers such as comfort or usability. However, participants were allowed to listen to music of their choice via radio, CD or personal music device.
Behavioral: Cycling to Music
Each participant exercised twice weekly for 10 weeks on the Gamebike® but the games and controls were turned off. The Gamebike® was used by both groups to control for any differences between two cycle ergometers such as comfort or usability. However, participants were allowed to listen to music of their choice via radio, CD or personal music device. We incorporated music into the control condition because most youth and young adults exercise to music and this provides a more stringent test of the Gamebike® while improving the ecological validity of the research design. We also wanted to minimize drop-out and felt that expecting overweight/obese adolescents, who often report disliking aerobic exercise, to bike in a lab with no form of distraction would create a less than desirable exercise environment and result in high drop-out rates.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Energy Expenditure (kilocalories) [ Time Frame: baseline and 10-weeks ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Aerobic fitness [ Time Frame: baseline and 10 weeks ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   12 Years to 17 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • youth aged 12-17 years with BMI above 95th percentile for age and gender based on CDC growth chart data, OR
  • BMI > 85th percentile for age and gender with one of the following:
  • elevated fasting glucose or 2 hour OGTT (indicative of impaired glucose tolerance)
  • elevated fasting triglycerides, LDL-C, reduced HDL-C
  • total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio > 90th percentile
  • elevated fasting insulin
  • Blood pressure > 90th percentile
  • 1st degree relative with Type II diabetes or cardiovascular disease
  • Willingness to follow protocol and sign informed assent and consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Did not have a medical condition that altered intestinal absorption
  • Did not influence response to activity intervention or make vigorous exercise dangerous - such as
  • type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • inflammatory bowel disease,
  • severe arthritis/asthma,
  • congestive heart failure,
  • pulmonary disease,
  • systemic hypertension,
  • acute renal disease
  • other illness assessed by the study physician making participation inadvisable

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00983970


Locations
Layout table for location information
Canada, Ontario
Children's Hospital Of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1H 8L1
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
Canadian Diabetes Association
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Gary S Goldfield, Ph.D. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Principal Investigator: Kristi B Adamo, PhD. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Study Director: Jane A Rutherford, MSc Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Dr. Gary Goldfield, Senior Scientist, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00983970    
Other Study ID Numbers: GA-2-06-2106-GG
CDA-GG-2-06-2106-GG
First Posted: September 24, 2009    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 24, 2009
Last Verified: September 2009
Keywords provided by Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario:
Adolescents
Obesity
Exercise
Music
Virtual Reality
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Layout table for MeSH terms
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms