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Treatment of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease With n-3 Fatty Acids (WELCOME)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00760513
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 26, 2008
Results First Posted : October 25, 2019
Last Update Posted : October 25, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute for Health Research, United Kingdom
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust

Brief Summary:

Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) imposes a high and increasing burden on the NHS, yet there is presently no licensed treatment or validated approach to management. NAFLD predisposes to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, increased risk of cardiovascular disease and may progress to chronic irreversible liver disease.

In NAFLD patients, the investigators will test the hypothesis that treatment with long chain n-3 fatty acid supplementation for 18 months favourably influences bio-markers for NAFLD and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Drug: OMACOR Drug: Placebo oral capsule Phase 4

Detailed Description:

We will recruit people with NAFLD who have been diagnosed as part of their NHS care with having this condition. At present there is no treatment for this condition. Over time a proportion of people with NAFLD.

Purpose and design

We are asking the research question ' Does treatment with purified long chain n-3 fatty acids (purified fish oil) improve non alcoholic fatty liver disease and risk factors for heart disease and type 2 (adult) diabetes that are strongly linked to this liver condition?'

Presently there is no treatment for this liver condition. Research evidence suggests that purified long chain n-3 fatty acids might be beneficial for this condition.

To address this research question we want to undertake a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial recruiting people who have been diagnosed with a liver biopsy as having the liver condition.

A protocol change that were approved during in the course of the study in October 2011.

In the protocol, we have deleted information regarding liver biopsy that was to be offered at the end of the study.

Having collated volunteer opinion and local consultant opinion, whereas a high proportion of volunteers were happy to undergo a follow up liver biopsy, our local hepatologists now consider that in 2011, the small risk of morbidity and mortality of volunteers undergoing liver biopsy is unacceptable, within the context of a research study. Their opinions have changed since 2008 when the initial LREC approval was granted.

Liver biopsy was always an optional extra and would only have been undertaken in a subgroup of the volunteers. Therefore, removal of liver biopsy from the protocol does not affect the validity of the study to test effects of the n-3 fatty acid intervention on biomarkers and liver fat in people with non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Besides removal of liver biopsy from the protocol, we have clarified in the protocol, the end points of the study and numbers randomised to either n-3 fatty acid or placebo (n=100, as always intended). We have also made it clear in the amendment that measurement of liver fat is also a primary outcome of the study. (We already have permission to undertake this test but it was uncertain when the study was approved that we would have sufficient funding for this expensive test and it was originally not a primary outcome).

We have therefore added a power calculation (and cited the relevant literature) to show that with a sample size of n=100 people, based upon the known treatment effects of n-3 fatty acids on liver fat, we have acceptable power to detect the predicted decrease in this outcome with treatment.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 103 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Effects of Purified n-3 Fatty Acids on Serum Fibrosis Markers and Cardiovascular Risk Markers in a Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial in Patients With Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Actual Study Start Date : November 1, 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 1, 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : November 29, 2018


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Omega 3 fatty acid (fish oil)
OMACOR (alternative name: Lovaza) 4 grammes daily, oral capsule
Drug: OMACOR
4 grammes daily, oral capsule
Other Name: Lovaza

Placebo Comparator: dummy pill
4 grammes daily, oral capsule (olive oil)
Drug: Placebo oral capsule
4 grammes daily, oral capsule (olive oil)
Other Name: Dummy




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percentage of Liver Fat [ Time Frame: Baseline and 18 months ]
    Percentage of liver fat was measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy at baseline and end of study. High percentage values indicate a lot of liver fat (scale from 0 to 100%). Change in liver fat percentage represented the arithmetical difference between end of study liver fat percentage minus baseline measurement of liver fat percentage change in liver fat percentage was used to test whether the intervention decreased liver fat percentage. A negative change value in liver fat percentage indicates a response to therapy. A positive change value indicates no response to therapy.

  2. Liver Fibrosis Score [ Time Frame: Baseline and 18 months ]
    The Liver Fibrosis Score is an algorithmically derived score of liver fibrosis comprising measurements of tissue matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), hyaluronic acid (HA) and the amino terminal end of procollagen III (PIIINP) (see Guha et al. in Reference section). The Score represents a number on a numerical scale from 0 to 20. High values of the score (measured in arbitrary units) indicate high probability of advanced liver fibrosis, low scores indicate low probability of advanced liver fibrosis. Change in Liver Fibrosis Score was used to test the intervention. Change in liver fibrosis score represented the change in measurement as calculated as the arithmetic difference between the end value minus the baseline value of the Liver Fibrosis Score. The change in Liver Fibrosis Score can therefore be negative (representing an improvement in liver fibrosis between baseline and end of study) or be positive, (representing a worsening a liver fibrosis between baseline and end of study.

  3. NAFLD Fibrosis Score [ Time Frame: Baseline and 18 months ]
    The NAFLD fibrosis score represented a validated algorithmically-derived measure of liver fibrosis as reported in Angulo et al (see reference section). The Score is derived from anthropometric and biochemical measurements in subjects. The NAFLD fibrosis score represents an arbitrary number with no units from -5.0 to +5.0. High positive NAFLD fibrosis scores indicate a high probability of advanced liver fibrosis. Negative scores represent a low probability of advanced liver fibrosis. The change in NAFLD fibrosis score (measured in arbitrary units) was used to test the effect of the intervention and represented the arithmetic difference in the end minus baseline measurements of this score. Thus, a negative change in the Score in the Table represented an improvement in liver fibrosis score between baseline and the end of the study. A positive change in the Score in the Table represented a worsening in liver fibrosis score between baseline and end of the study.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  1. Steatohepatitis diagnosed on normal clinical grounds including in most cases liver biopsy and assessed by Kleiner scoring system to assess severity, with no known aetiological factors for underlying liver disease (e.g. exclusion of hepatitis A, B & C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, haemochromatosis).
  2. Steatosis diagnosed by ultrasound, CT or magnetic resonance imaging who also have either diabetes and/or features of the metabolic syndrome, without evidence of known aetiological factors for underlying liver disease (e.g. exclusion of hepatitis A, B & C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, haemochromatosis).

Liver biopsy or liver scan will be within 3 years of recruitment to the study. Age: men & women >18 years. Alcohol consumption <35 units / week for women <50 units / week for men).

Exclusion criteria:

  • Decompensated acute or chronic liver disease, or harmful drinking (> 35 u/week in women > 50 u /week in men).

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00760513


Locations
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United Kingdom
Southamption General Hospital
Southampton, Hants, United Kingdom, SO166YD
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
National Institute for Health Research, United Kingdom
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Christopher D Byrne, MBBCh PhD University of Southampton, UK
Publications of Results:
Other Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):

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Responsible Party: University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00760513    
Other Study ID Numbers: 25-12-59. (R&D: RHM MED 0836)
08/H0502/165 ( Other Identifier: Local Research Ethics Committee )
First Posted: September 26, 2008    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: October 25, 2019
Last Update Posted: October 25, 2019
Last Verified: October 2019
Keywords provided by University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust:
non alcoholic fatty liver disease
NAFLD
fish oil
intervention
RCT
biomarkers
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Liver Diseases
Fatty Liver
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Digestive System Diseases